Hungarian

The courses below are offered through the Language Resource Center.

For questions about specific courses, contact the department:

Offices:
353 International Affairs Building Extension
212-854-9224
Monday–Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.; Friday 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Web: http://www.lrc.columbia.edu/


Directory of Classes

The course information displayed on this page relies on an external system and may be incomplete. Please visit the Directory of Classes for complete course information.

After finding your course in the Directory of Classes, click on the section number to open an expanded view. The "Open To" field will indicate whether the course is open to School of Professional Studies students. If School of Professional Studies is not included in the field, students may still be able to cross-register for the course by obtaining permission after being admitted to an academic program.


HNGR UN1101 Elementary Hungarian I. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic structures of the Hungarian language. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Fall 2018: HNGR UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1101 001/21433 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
501 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 4 3/20
HNGR 1101 001/21433 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
518 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 4 3/20

HNGR UN1102 Elementary Hungarian II. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic structures of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Spring 2019: HNGR UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1102 001/66542 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
501 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 4 1/20

HNGR UN3343 Hungarian Descriptive Grammar. 3 points.

This course is designed for those curious about the structure of Hungarian - an unusual language with a complex grammar quite different from English, or, indeed, any Indo -European language. The study of Hungarian, a language of the Finno-Ugric family, offers the opportunity to learn about the phonology of vowel harmony, the syntax of topic-comment discourse, verb agreement with subjects and objects, highly developed case systems and possessive nominal paradigms. In addition to its inflectional profile, Hungarian derivation possibilities are vast, combinatory, and playful. During the semester we will touch upon all the important grammatical aspects of Hungarian and discuss them in relation to general linguistic principles and discourse, and finally, through some text analysis, see them in action. Although the primary discussion will center on Hungarian, we will draw on comparisons to other Finno-Ugric languages, most notably Finnish and Komi; students are encouraged to draw on comparisons with their own languages of interest. No prerequisite. Counts as Core Linguistics.

Spring 2019: HNGR UN3343
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 3343 001/76395 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Carol Rounds 3 5/18

HNGR W1202 Intermediate Hungarian II. 4 points.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

HNGR W2101 Intermediate Hungarian I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR W1101-W1102 or the equivalent.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

HNGR W3340 Advanced Hungarian Grammar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR W1201 or the equivalent.

Advanced Hungarian Grammar focuses on the more complex syntactic/semantic constructions of Hungarian in addition to vocabulary enrichment. Readings in literature, oral presentations, translations, and essays serve to enhance the grammatical material.

HNGR W3341 Advanced Hungarian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR W1201-W1202 and HNGR W3340, or the equivalent.

W3341y has an emphasis on rapid and comprehensive reading of academic materials. In addition to weekly readings, oral presentations and written essays serve to improve fluency in all aspects of Hungarian.

HNGR W4028 Modern Hungarian Prose in Translation: Exposing Naked Reality. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

This course introduces students to representative examples of an essentially robust, reality-bound, socially aware literature. In modern Hungarian prose fiction, the tradition of nineteenth-century "anecdotal realism" remained strong and was further enlivened by various forms of naturalism. Even turn-of-the century and early twentieth-century modernist fiction is characterized by strong narrative focus, psychological realism, and an emphasis on social conditions and local color. During the tumultuous decades of the century, social, political, national issues preoccupied even aesthetics-conscious experimenters and ivory-tower dwellers. Among the topics discussed will be "populist" and "urban" literature in the interwar years, post-1945 reality in fiction, literary memoirs and reportage, as well as late-century minimalist and postmodern trends.

HNGR W4050 The Hungarian New Wave: Cinema in Kadarist Hungary [In English]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Hungarian cinema, like film-making in Czechoslovakia, underwent a renaissance in the 1960's, but the Hungarian new wave continued to flourish in the 70's and film remained one of the most important art forms well into the 80's. This course examines the cultural, social and political context of representative Hungarian films of the Kadarist period, with special emphasis on the work of such internationally known filmmakers as Miklos Jancso, Karoly Makk, Marta Meszaros, and Istvan Szabo. In addition to a close analysis of individual films, discussion topics will include the "newness"of the new wave in both form and content (innovations in film language, cinematic impressionism, allegorical-parabolic forms, auteurism, etc.), the influence of Italian, French, German and American cinema, the relationship between film and literature, the role of film in the cultures of Communist Eastern Europe, the state of contemporary Hungarian cinema. The viewing of the films will be augmented by readings on Hungarian cinema, as well as of relevant Hungarian literary works.

The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors as may become necessary.