Greek

The courses below are offered through the Department of Classics.

For questions about specific courses, contact the department:

Departmental Office: 617 Hamilton
212-854-3902
classics@columbia.edu
Office Hours: Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Web: www.columbia.edu/cu/classics

 

Hellenic Studies Program
hg2252@columbia.edu

Co-Directors: Professor Karen Van Dyck and Professor Stathis Gourgouris, 606 Hamilton
212-851-0297
vandyck@columbia.edu


Directory of Classes

The course information displayed on this page relies on an external system and may be incomplete. Please visit Classics on the Directory of Classes for complete course information.

After finding your course in the Directory of Classes, click on the section number to open an expanded view. The "Open To" field will indicate whether the course is open to School of Professional Studies students. If School of Professional Studies is not included in the field, students may still be able to cross-register for the course by obtaining permission after being admitted to an academic program.


GREK G4135 The Erotokritos: Literature and Society In Renaissance Crete. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A cross-disciplinary examination of literature and society in Renaissance Crete throught a reading of Vitsentzos Kornaros’s Erotokritos. Close textual analyses of this whimsical romance in verse and projects on broader aspects of Venetian and Cretan culture.  Attention paid to questions of gender.

GREK G4140 Greek Stylistics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GREK W4139.

The study of the development of Greek prose style through practice in composition.

GREK G6246 Literary Papyrology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course intends to give a student the capacity to handle literary texts on papyrus written in Greek and Latin. Students will learn to distinguish book hands from documentary hands, will read and evaluate ancient writing according to style, and will learn to edit new texts. A final paper will consist of the edition of a text and the comparison with other texts in the same tradition.

GREK G6250 Greek Paleography and Textual Criticism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to the main kinds of Greek scripts and to the chief problems in editing and interpreting Greek texts; the history and transmission of Greek authors.

GREK G6254 Greek Epigraphy. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to the use of inscriptions in the Greek world. Readings come principally from published texts of Greek inscriptions of the classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods, chosen to illustrate the range and contents of our major source of information for most Greek cities. Attention also to the technique of inscriptions and to their sociological function.

GREK G8213 Herodotus. 3 points.

The purpose of this seminar is to examine and ultimately to challenge the fundamental premises underlying the way Herodotus has been read through much of the Twentieth Century. This course will analyse the ways in which Herodotus' ostensibly archaic history constitutes also a commentary on later times, as an account which performs a critique not only of the political situation of Herodotus' day, but also the philosophical and intellectual trends that are part and parcel of any historical phenomenon, and here in particular are included such trends as Protagorean relativism, Hippocratic medicine, and indeed historiography itself. Through close examination of key sections of the Histories, we will reevaluate the text of the Histories in its own time, considering questions of genre and focusing on the context in which it was performed, written and circulated, and its contribution to theoretical and practical political debates and discussions dominant in its time. At the same time we will engage critically with the scholarly approaches which have been dominant in reading and misreading this sophisticated author, and what they themselves reveal about Herodotus' modern readers.

GREK G8251 The Chorus In Greek Tragedy. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A detailed study of the role of the tragic chorus in one play by each of the major tragic poets: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. The origin of the tragic chorus, choral performance, the use of meter, choral identity and character, and choral songs (both act-dividing songs and songs shared by actors and chorus).

GREK G8270 Plutarch. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A close examination of Plutarch

GREK G8453 Selfhood and Autonomy in Greek Texts of the Imperial Period. 3 points.

According to Hegel, modern subjectivity begins when Martin Luther, standing before the Diet at Worms, discovers that he "can do no other" than follow the dictates of his conscience. Others, such as Charles Taylor, have located the discovery of an inner self much earlier, in Augustine's Confessions. Our seminar will be devoted to exploring the ways, and the forms, in which questions of selfhood and autonomy - of what a person really is, and over what s/he has (and does not have) control - actually came to the fore well before Augustine, in a variety of writings in Greek from a variety of genres, during the Roman Imperial Period. We aim to explore a wide range of texts with such interests in mind, to see both the points of overlap, and the differences, and to consider the ways in which the conceptions of autonomy and selfhood evident in these texts might relate to political, social, and cultural phenomena of the Greek-speaking world in the 1st and 2nd centuries CE. Readings may include: selections from the New Testament; philosophical works by Epictetus, Plotinus, and Porphyry; excerpts from prose fiction by Chariton, Heliodorus, and Xenophon of Ephesus; selected works by Plutarch, Dio Chrysostom, Lucian, Philostratus, and Athenaeus.

GREK G8500 Greek Rhetoric. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of Demosthenes 18 and Aeschines 3 with special attention to issues of character defamation as relevant passages from Aristotle's Rhetoric on characterization.

GREK G8555 Greek Literature & Literary Theory. 3 points.

This course is designed as an exposure to central approaches in modern literary theory that have been influential in scholarship on ancient Greek literature. It addresses a perceived need in the department as well as the field to foster continued engagement with questions of methodology that do not merely treat philological or historical techniques as neutral and transparent. The course will analyze dominant theoretical trends, explore their backgrounds, and consider why scholars of ancient Greek literature have treated certain theories as more productive than others. Where relevant, it will also consider the similarities and the differences between ancient and modern theories of literature. Each component will extend over three classes and address a modern approach in relation to an ancient text and include readings in theory as well as its scholarly applications. Topics include narratology and Homeric Epic, semiotics of theater and Greek tragedy, performance theory and Greek comedy, and post-structuralism and Plato.

GREK G8725 Athenian Comedy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Greek 3309/3310 or the equivalent, or the permission of the instructor

In this seminar, we will study selected fragments of comedies by Aristophanes, Cratinus, Eupolis, and other comic dramatists active in Athens during the classical period, in conjunction with ancient testimonia, material evidence such as vase paintings and terracotta figurines, the extant works of Aristophanes and Menander, and modern analysis, interpretations, and reconstruction.  The order in which we will consider the primary material will be guided by consideration of both chronological and thematic relationships among the fragments and the surviving plays.

GREK GU4009 Sophocles & Aristophanes. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1201 and V1202, or their equivalent.

Since the content of the course changes from year to year, it may be taken in consecutive years.

Fall 2017: GREK GU4009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4009 001/15300 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
707 Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3 8/20

GREK GU4105 History of Greek Literature I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Greek at the 3000-level or higher.

Readings in Greek literature from Homer to the 4th century B.C.

Fall 2017: GREK GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4105 001/72904 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
617b Hamilton Hall
Deborah Steiner 4 10/15

GREK UN3309 Imperial Prose. 3 points.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Fall 2017: GREK UN3309
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3309 001/07460 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
327 Milbank Hall
Helene Foley 3 8

GREK UN3980 The Post-Baccalaureate Seminar. 3 points.

Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Fall 2017: GREK UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3980 001/14636 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 3/15

GREK V1201 Intermediate Greek I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1101-1102 or the equivalent.

Selections from Attic prose.

GREK V1202 Intermediate Greek II: Homer. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1101-V1102 or GREK V1121 or the equivalent.

Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques or oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer.

GREK V3015 Philo of Alexandria: Historical Essays and the Contemplative Life. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

We will read in the original language selections from three treatises -- In Flaccum, Legatio ad Gaium, and De Vita Contemplativa -- of Philo of Alexandria; aside from their importance as Imperial Greek texts, these essays provide essential and very rare evidence for the environment (early Imperial Alexandria) and thought of their author.

GREK V3320 Intensive Reading Course. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent.

This course is limited to students in the Postbaccalaureate program. The intensive reading of a series of Greek texts, both prose and verse, with special emphasis on detailed stylistic and grammatical analysis of the language.

GREK W4006 Thucydides. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: GREK V1201 and V1202, or their equivalent.

A close reading of Thucydides Book 2, with consideration of its function in the history as a whole.

GREK W4020 Josephus on Siege and Triumph. 4 points.

Prerequisites: appropriate level of Greek.

The main goal of this course is to read books 6 and 7 of Josephus's Jewish War, in particular the sections on the siege and destruction of Jerusalem and the Roman triumph.  We will be using the text of Benedikt Niese, Flavii Iosephi Opera, Berlin: Weidmann, 1885-1897 (repr. 1955), which is helpfully reproduced with minor alterations in the Loeb Classical Library edition.  Everyone is required to prepare the assigned portion of Greek text for each class; in addition, there will be (depending on the size of the class) several short writing assignments or in-class presentations featuring analysis of a section of the text, and a final paper.

GREK W4108 History of the Greek and Latin Languages. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores the reasons behind the grammatical structures of classical Greek and Latin, based on examination of earlier forms of the languages and on comparison with related languages. The techniques and principles of historical linguistics will also be examined.

GREK W4139 Elements of Prose Style. 3 points.

Prerequisites: at least four terms of Greek, or the equivalent.

An intensive review of Greek syntax with translation of English sentences and paragraphs into Attic Greek.

GREK W4140 Greek Stylistics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: GREK W 4139 or the equivalent.

The study of the development of Greek prose style through practice in composition.

GREK W4150 The Greek Language. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to the phonology and morphology of the Greek language; study of vowels and consonants, noun and verb formation, and characteristics of the Greek dialects, in light of the relation of Greek to Proto-Indo-European and the comparison of Greek forms to other PIE (Proto-Indo-European) languages, demonstrating how the comparative method in historical linguistics accounts for the evolution of the Greek language.

GREK W4210 Topics in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: before taking this course, it is encouraged that you read Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics and Plato's Protagoras in English.

The course will be devoted to reading Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics in ancient Greek and discussions will focus on concepts found therein.

GRKM G4200 Travelers, Migrants, and Refugees in the Modern Mediterranean. 3 points.

Explores literary representations of movement primarily in the Eastern Mediterranean. Of special interest are the mythologies of western travelers and their reception in the host culture; orientalism; classicism; colonialism and the "expat"; the representation of immigrants; the exchange of populations provoked by the violent passage from Empire to nation-statism; the effects of multiculturalism and globalization on notions of space and identity in postmodern novels of the region

GRKM G4420 Greece and Turkey: Literature and Politics. 3-4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The relationship between Greece and Turkey, as well as between Greeks and Turks (and Cypriots), has traditionally been considered one of animosity and mistrust.  This perspective falls short of capturing the complexities of a long history of encounters -- literary, cultural, linguistic, political, musical, architectural -- in a variety of contexts -- Byzantine, Ottoman, colonial (e.g. Cyprus), national, transnational.  This course will consider the nature of these contracts in their literary and cultural representation, their wider rhetorics and fundamental (meta)narratives in the modern period.  All texts available in English translation.  Though this course presupposes no knowledge of Greek, students wanting to read in the original are encouraged to take the 1-credit tutorial offered simultaneously through the Program in Hellenic Studies.

GRKM GU4135 Topics Through Greek Film. 3-4 points.

Optional 1-point bilingual guided reading.

This course explores issues of memory and trauma, public history and testimony, colonialism and biopolitics, neoliberalism and governmentality, and crisis and kinship, all through the medium of Greek film. It brings the Greek cinema canon (Angelopoulos, Gavras, Cacoyiannis, Koundouros, et al.) into conversation with the work of contemporary artists, documentary filmmakers, and the recent “weird wave” and asks: what kind of lens does film offer onto the study of a society’s history and contemporary predicament? The viewing and discussion of films is facilitated through a consideration of a wide range of materials, including novels, criticism, archival footage, and interviews with directors. The course does not assume any background knowledge and all films will have English subtitles. An additional 1-credit bilingual option (meeting once per week at a time TBD) is offered for students who wish to read, view, and discuss materials in Greek.

Fall 2017: GRKM GU4135
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 4135 001/18583 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
C01 80 Claremont
Dimitrios Antoniou 3-4 5/20

GRKM UN1101 Elementary Modern Greek I. 4 points.

This is the first semester of a year-long course designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and converse on a wide range of topics, students explore Modern Greece's cultural landscape from "parea" to poetry to politics. Special attention will be paid to Greek New York. How do "our", "American", "Greek-American" definitions of language and culture differ from "their", "Greek" ones?

Fall 2017: GRKM UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 1101 001/16223 M W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Nikolas Kakkoufa 4 9/18

GRKM UN2102 Intermediate Modern Greek II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101 or the equivalent.

Continuation of GRKM V2101. Students complete their knowledge of the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax while continuing to enrich their vocabulary.

Spring 2018: GRKM UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 2102 001/11720 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Nikolas Kakkoufa 4 2/20

GRKM V3135 Topics Through Greek Film. 3 points.

This course explores the history and culture of modern Greece through film. It brings the Greek cinema canon (Angelopoulos, Ferris, Gavras, Cacoyiannis, Koundouros, et al.) into conversation with the work of contemporary artists, documentary filmmakers, and the recent “weird wave.” In doing so, the course addresses issues of memory and trauma, public history and testimony, colonialism and biopolitics, neoliberalism and governmentality, and crisis and kinship, and it asks: what kind of lens does film offer onto the study of a society’s history and contemporary predicament? The viewing and discussion of films is facilitated through a consideration of a wide range of materials, including novels, criticism, archival footage, and interviews with directors. The course does not assume any background knowledge and all films will have English subtitles. An additional 1-credit bilingual option (meeting once per week at a time TBD) is offered for students who wish to read, view, and discuss materials in Greek.

GRKM V3308 Athens. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduces students to important discussions about culture and society in contemporary Greece. Examines the themes of gender, family, kinship, ethnicity, friendship, national identity and diaspora, individuality and community, class, and citizenship. Readings include essays by distinguished contemporary Greek scholars and are intended to offer students a comprehensive perspective of contemporary Greek cultural criticism.

GRKM V3400 Diaspora & Translation. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to the rich tradition of literature about and by Greeks in America over the past century, exploring questions of ethnic identity, gender, and language. Students examine how contemporary debates in diaspora studies and translation theory can inform each other and how both, in turn, can inform a discussion of the writing of the Greek American experience in histories, novels, poetry, travel literature, performance art, and films. Authors include Kazan, Gage, Broumas, Spanidou, Galas, Selz, Papandreou, and Petrakis.

GRKM W1211 Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation. 1 point.

For students in GRKM V1201, but also open to students not enrolled in GRKM V1201, who wish to improve their spoken Modern Greek. For more information, contact Dr. Maria Hadjipolycarpou at mh3505@columbia.edu

GRKM W2111 Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation. 1 point.

For students in GRKM V1201, but also open to students not enrolled in GRKM V1201, who wish to improve their spoken Modern Greek. For more information, contact Dr. Maria Hadjipolycarpou at mh3505@columbia.edu

GRKM W2112 Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation. 1 point.

For students in GRKM V2102, but also open to students not enrolled in GRKM V2102, who wish to improve their spoken Modern Greek. For more information, contact Dr. Maria Hadjipolycarpou at mh3505@columbia.edu

GRKM W4250 The Greek Islands 1600-present. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101-GRKM V2102 or the instructor's permission.

Texts in Greek and English. Selective survey of key literary texts from Crete, the Ionian Isles, the Cyclades, and the Dodecannese, as well as western texts about these topoi. Sometimes, island paradises and retreats; othertimes, sites of political internment or occupation. Texts will be read in historical specificity; in linguistic, cultural, political, utopic terms. Texts will include selections from Kornaros’s Erotokritos, Jesuit Cycladic theater, folksongs, Solomos, Papadiamantis, Theotokis, Venezis, Elytis, Ritsos, Karapanou, as well as some Greek and foreign contemporary films.

GRKM W4300 Worlding Cavafy: Desire & Media. 4 points.

By examining Cavafy's work in all its permutations (as criticism, translation, adaptation), this course introduces students to a wide range of critical approaches used in World Literature, Gender Studies, and Translation Studies.  The Cavafy case becomes an experimental ground for different kinds of comparative literature methods, those that engage social-historical issues such as sexuality, diaspora, postcoloniality as well as linguistic issues such as multilingualism, media and translation. How does this poet "at a slight angle to the universe" challenge contemporary theories of gender and literature as national institution? How can studying a canonical author open up our theories and practices of translation? Among the materials considered are translations by Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard, James Merrill, and Marguerite Yourcenar, commentary by E.M. Forster, C.M. Bowra, and Roman Jakobson, poems by W.H. Auden, Lawrence Durrell, and Joseph Brodsky, and visual art by David Hockney and Duane Michals. Though this course presupposes no knowledge of Greek, students wanting to read Cavafy in the original are encouraged to take the 1-credit directed reading tutorial offered simultaneously.

GRKM W4430 Greece and the Modern Imagination. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of Philhellenism, the Hellenic Ideal in Europe, and the Greek National response to it. 

The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors as may become necessary.