Biological Sciences

The Department of Biological Sciences offers courses in molecular biology and evolution, environmental biology, genetics, biotechnology, and bioethics, as well as biology labs.

For questions about specific courses, contact the department:

Departmental Office: 600 Fairchild
212-854-4581
Office Hours: Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Web: www.columbia.edu/cu/biology


Directory of Classes

The course information displayed on this page relies on an external system and may be incomplete. Please visit Biological Sciences on the Directory of Classes for complete course information.

After finding your course in the Directory of Classes, click on the section number to open an expanded view. The "Open To" field will indicate whether the course is open to School of Professional Studies students. If School of Professional Studies is not included in the field, students may still be able to cross-register for the course by obtaining permission after being admitted to an academic program.


BIOC GU4501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism. 4 points.

Undergraduates should register for BIOC C3501.

Prerequisites: one year of BIOL C2005 and BIOL C2006 and one year of organic chemistry.

Lecture and recitation. Students wishing to cover the full range of modern biochemistry should take both BIOC C3501 and C3512. C3501 covers subject matters in modern biochemistry, including chemical biology and structural biology, discussing the structure and function of both proteins and small molecules in biological systems. Proteins are the primary class of biological macromolecules and serve to carry out most cellular functions. Small organic molecules function in energy production and creating building blocks for the components of cells and can also be used to perturb the functions of proteins directly. The first half of the course covers protein structure, enzyme kinetics and enzyme mechanism. The second half of the course explores how small molecules are used endogenously by living systems in metabolic and catabolic pathways; this part of the course focuses on mechanistic organic chemistry involved in metabolic pathways.

Fall 2017: BIOC GU4501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOC 4501 001/68045 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
4 0/0

BIOC UN3501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: one year of BIOL C2005 and BIOL C2006 and one year of organic chemistry.

Lecture and recitation. Students wishing to cover the full range of modern biochemistry should take both BIOC C3501 and C3512. C3501 covers subject matters in modern biochemistry, including chemical biology and structural biology, discussing the structure and function of both proteins and small molecules in biological systems. Proteins are the primary class of biological macromolecules and serve to carry out most cellular functions. Small organic molecules function in energy production and creating building blocks for the components of cells and can also be used to perturb the functions of proteins directly. The first half of the course covers protein structure, enzyme kinetics and enzyme mechanism. The second half of the course explores how small molecules are used endogenously by living systems in metabolic and catabolic pathways; this part of the course focuses on mechanistic organic chemistry involved in metabolic pathways.

Fall 2017: BIOC UN3501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOC 3501 001/19218 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Deborah Mowshowitz 4 139/100

BIOC W5501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism. 4 points.

Undergraduates should register for BIOC C3501.

Prerequisites: one year of BIOL C2005 and BIOL C2006 and one year of organic chemistry.

Lecture and recitation. Students wishing to cover the full range of modern biochemistry should take both BIOC C3501 and C3512. C3501 covers subject matters in modern biochemistry, including chemical biology and structural biology, discussing the structure and function of both proteins and small molecules in biological systems. Proteins are the primary class of biological macromolecules and serve to carry out most cellular functions. Small organic molecules function in energy production and creating building blocks for the components of cells and can also be used to perturb the functions of proteins directly. The first half of the course covers protein structure, enzyme kinetics and enzyme mechanism. The second half of the course explores how small molecules are used endogenously by living systems in metabolic and catabolic pathways; this part of the course focuses on mechanistic organic chemistry involved in metabolic pathways.

BIOC W5512 Molecular Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one year of biology. Recommended but not required: BIOC C3501.

This is a lecture course designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The focus is on understanding at the molecular level how genetic information is stored within the cell and how it is regulated. Topics covered include genome organization, DNA replication, transcription, RNA processing, and translation. This course will also emphasize the critical analysis of the scientific literature and help students understand how to identify important biological problems and how to address them experimentally. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

BIOL G4045 Seminar in Cell Biology: Microbial Pathogenesis and the Host Response. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Cell Biology (3041/4041) and the instructor's permission.

This is a combined lecture/seminar course designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The focus is on understanding how infectious microbes manipulate host cell processes to multiply and evade immune detection. In each class, an introductory lecture will provide a summary of the biology of the organism under discussion and historical findings that have improved our understanding of host/pathogen interactions. Students will then present and discuss in detail recent papers and background material concerning specific aspects of microbial infection and the host response.

BIOL G4310 Intensive Lab in Biotechnology. 6 points.

Intense laboratory exercise where students meet 4 days a week for eight weeks in the summer term participating in experimental design, bench work, and data analysis. Grades depend on participation in the laboratory, reports, and practical exams. Class starts immediately following Spring final exams. Open to MA and Postbac Biotechnology students. This course is offered in the summer. Students from other schools or programs may enroll if space is available.

Summer 2017: BIOL G4310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4310 001/67146 M T W Th 10:00am - 3:00pm
743 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Lili Yamasaki 6 5

BIOL G5310 Intensive Lab in Biotechnology. 6 points.

Intense laboratory exercise where students meet 4 days a week for eight weeks in the summer term participating in experimental design, bench work, and data analysis. Grades depend on participation in the laboratory, reports, and practical exams. Class starts immediately following Spring final exams. Open to MA and Postbac Biotechnology students. This course is offered in the summer. Students from other schools or programs may enroll if space is available.

BIOL GU4001 Advanced Genetic Analysis. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: for undergraduates: Introductory Genetics (W3031) and the instructor's permission.

This seminar course provides a detailed presentation of areas in classical and molecular genetics for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. Topics include transmission genetics, gain and loss of function mutations, genetic redundancy, suppressors, enhancers, epistasis, expression patterns, using transposons, and genome analysis. The course is a mixture of lectures, student presentations, seminar discussions, and readings from the original literature. 

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4001 001/28964 M 1:10pm - 3:55pm
1000 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Martin Chalfie 3 12/28

BIOL GU4022 Developmental Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005-C2006 or equivalent.

Come discover how the union of egg and sperm triggers the complex cellular interactions that specify the diverse variety of cells present in multicellular organisms. Cellular and molecular aspects of sex determination, gametogenesis, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, telomerase as the biological clock, stem cells, cloning, the pill and cell interactions will be explored, with an emphasis on humans. Original research articles will be discussed to further examine current research in developmental biology. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4022
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4022 001/23456 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Alice Heicklen 3 0/0

BIOL GU4034 Biotechnology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: genetics or molecular biology.

The course covers techniques currently used to explore and manipulate gene function and their applications in medicine and the environment. Part I covers key laboratory manipulations, including DNA cloning, gene characterization, association of genes with disease, and methods for studying gene regulation and activities of gene products. Part II also covers commercial applications, and includes animal cell culture, production of recombinant proteins, novel diagnostics, high throughput screening, and environmental biosensors.

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4034
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4034 001/64039 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Lawrence Chasin, Daniel Kalderon 3 3/65

BIOL GU4041 Cell Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one year of biology, normally BIOL C2005-C2006, or the equivalent.

Cell Biology 3041/4041 is an upper-division course that covers in depth all organelles of cells, how they make up tissues, secrete substances important for the organism, generate and adapt to their working environment in the body, move throughout development, and signal to each other. Because these topics were introduced in the Intro Course (taught by Mowshowitz and Chasin), this course or its equivalent is a pre-requisite for W3041/4041. Students for whom this course is useful include biology, biochem or biomedical engineering majors, those preparing to apply for medical school or graduate school, and those doing or planning to start doing research in a biology or biomedical lab. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4041
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4041 001/63798 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Jeannette Bulinski 3 1/20

BIOL GU4260 Proteomics Laboratory. 3 points.

Lab Fee: $150.

This course deals with the proteome: the expressed protein complement of a cell, matrix, tissue, organ or organism. The study of the proteome (proteomics) is broadly applicable to life sciences research, and is increasing important in academic, government and industrial research through extension of the impact of advances in genomics. These techniques are being applied to basic research, exploratory studies of cancer and other diseases, drug discovery and many other topics. Techniques of protein extraction, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry will be covered. Emphasis will be on mastery of practical techniques of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and database searching for identification of proteins separated by gel electrophoresis as well as background tutorials and exercises covering other techniques used in descriptive and comparative proteomics. Open to students in M.A. in Biotechnology Program (points can be counted against laboratory requirement for that program), Ph.D. and advanced undergraduate students with background in genetics or molecular biology. Students should be comfortable with basic biotechnology laboratory techniques as well as being interested in doing computational work in a Windows environment.

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4260
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4260 001/70498 F 12:30pm - 3:30pm
900 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Lewis Brown 3 5/8

BIOL UN3004 Neurobiology I: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: one year of biology; a course in physics is highly recommended.

Lecture and recitation. This is an advanced course intended for majors providing an in depth survey of the cellular and molecular aspects of nerve cell function. Topics include: the cell biology and biochemistry of neurons, ionic and molecular basis of electrical signals, synaptic transmission and its modulation, function of sensory receptors. Although not required, it is intended to be followed by Neurobiology II (see below). The recitation meets once per week in smaller groups and emphasizes readings from the primary literature. 

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3004
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3004 001/70760 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Jian Yang 4 74/115

BIOL UN3034 Biotechnology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
For upper-level undergraduates.

Prerequisites: genetics or molecular biology.

The course covers techniques currently used to explore and manipulate gene function and their applications in medicine and the environment. Part I covers key laboratory manipulations, including DNA cloning, gene characterization, association of genes with disease, and methods for studying gene regulation and activities of gene products. Part II also covers commercial applications, and includes animal cell culture, production of recombinant proteins, novel diagnostics, high throughput screening, and environmental biosensors. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3034
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3034 001/10153 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Lawrence Chasin, Daniel Kalderon 3 12/20

BIOL UN3041 Cell Biology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: one year of biology, normally BIOL C2005-C2006, or the equivalent.

Cell Biology 3041/4041 is an upper-division course that covers in depth all organelles of cells, how they make up tissues, secrete substances important for the organism, generate and adapt to their working environment in the body, move throughout development, and signal to each other. Because these topics were introduced in the Intro Course (taught by Mowshowitz and Chasin), this course or its equivalent is a pre-requisite for W3041/4041. Students for whom this course is useful include biology, biochem or biomedical engineering majors, those preparing to apply for medical school or graduate school, and those doing or planning to start doing research in a biology or biomedical lab. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3041
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3041 001/10486 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Jeannette Bulinski 3 37/70

BIOL UN3052 Project Laboratory in Molecular Genetics. 5 points.

Enrollment limited to approximately 12. Fee: $150.

Prerequisites: one year of introductory biology and the instructor's permission.

Project laboratory on the manipulation of nucleic acids in prokaryotes, including DNA isolation, restriction mapping, and transformation. The first part of the laboratory involves learning of techniques to be used subsequently in independent research projects suggested by the professor.

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3052
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3052 001/72497 T Th 1:10pm - 5:00pm
743 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Alexander Tzagoloff 5 12/12

BIOL W3008 The Cellular Physiology of Disease. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: one 3000-level course in Cell Biology or Biochemistry, or the instructor's permission.

This course will present a quantitative description of the cellular physiology of excitable cells (mostly nerve and muscle). While the course will focus on examining basic mechanisms in cell physiology, there will be a thread of discussion of disease mechanisms throughout. The end of each lecture will include a discussion of the molecular mechanisms of selected diseases that relate to the topics covered in the lecture. The course will consist of two lectures per week. This course will be of interest to advanced (3000-4000 level) undergraduates that aim to pursue careers in medicine as well as those that will pursue careers in biomedical research. This course will also be of interest to graduate students desiring an introduction to the cellular physiology of nerve and muscle.

BIOL W3193 Stem Cell Biology and Applications. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: three semesters of Biology or the instructor’s permission.

The course examines current knowledge and potential medical applications of pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells), direct conversions between cell types and adult, tissue-specific stem cells (concentrating mainly on hematopoietic and gut stem cells as leading paradigms). A basic lecture format will be supplemented by presentations and discussions of research papers. Recent reviews and research papers, together with extensive instructor notes, will be used in place of a textbook. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

BIOL W3208 Introduction to Evolutionary Biology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: recommended preparation: an introductory course in college biology.

Introduction to principles of general evolutionary theory, both nomological and historical; causes and processes of evolution; phylogenetic evolution; species concept and speciation; adaptation and macroevolution; concepts of phylogeny and classification.

BIOL W4077 Survey in Molecular and Cellular Biology: Cellular Stress Responses. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: one year of introductory biology and at least one semester of additional biology courses. Recommended: BIOL W3041 Cell Biology, BIOL C3512 Molecular Biology.

This is an advanced molecular and cellular biology course geared to upper level undergraduates and graduate students. The topic of this year will be cellular stress responses. We will read and analyze a series of reviews on this topic ranging from the stress of DNA damage on cells to metabolic stress to the stress of aging. We will also read key research articles on these topics. The signaling pathways, mechanisms, targets, and biological relevance will be reviewed. An emphasis will be made on understanding how important discoveries were made. Students will develop their own review articles on related subjects and present multiple research proposals.

BIOL W4082 Theoretical Foundations and Applications of Biophysical Methods. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least one year of coursework in single-variable calculus and not being freaked-out by multivariable calculus. Physics coursework through a calculus-based treatment of classical mechanics and electromagnetism. One year of general chemistry (either AP Chemistry or a college course). One year of college coursework in molecular/cellular biology and biochemistry equivalent to Biology C2005-2006 at Columbia.

Rigorous introduction to the theory underlying biophysical methods, which are illustrated by practical applications to biomedical research. Emphasizes the approach used by physical chemists to understand and analyze the behavior of molecules, while also preparing students to apply these methods in their own research. Course modules cover: (i) statistical analysis of data; (ii) solution thermodynamics; (iii) hydrodynamic methods; (iv) light-scattering methods; and (v) spectroscopic methods, especially fluorescence. Recitations focus on curve-fitting analyses of experimental data.

BIOL W4193 Stem Cell Biology and Applications. 3 points.

Corequisites: three semesters of Biology or the instructor’s permission.

The course examines current knowledge and potential medical applications of pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells), direct conversions between cell types and adult, tissue-specific stem cells (concentrating mainly on hematopoietic and gut stem cells as leading paradigms). A basic lecture format will be supplemented by presentations and discussions of research papers. Recent reviews and research papers together with extensive instructor notes will be used in place of a textbook.

BIOL W4400 Computational Genomics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course will meet as a seminar once weekly and will give a “hands on” introduction to genomics research. It will introduce the computational tools and statistical concepts needed to analyze and interpret next generation sequencing data (primarily RNA-seq). The course will cover machine-learning approaches to model and mine biological data. The course will survey current topics in systems biology, including gene expression, transcriptional regulation, epigenomics, ribosome profiling, enhancer localization, and genome conformation. The course will include a reading of primary literature and a genomics research project.

BIOL W4560 Evolution in the age of genomics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: introductory genetics or the instructor's permission.

This course introduces basic concepts in evolutionary biology, from speciation to natural selection. While the lectures incorporate a historical perspective, the main goal of the class is to familiarize students with topics and tools of evolutionary genetics as practiced today, in the era of genomics. Thus, the focus will be on evidence from molecular evolution and genetics and exercises will assume a basic background in genetics. Examples will be drawn from across the tree of life, but with a primary focus on humans.

BIOL W5008 The Cellular Physiology of Disease. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one 3000-level course in Cell Biology or Biochemistry or the instructor's permission.

This course will present a quantitative description of the cellular physiology of excitable cells (mostly nerve and muscle). While the course will focus on examining basic mechanisms in cell physiology, there will be a thread of discussion of disease mechanisms throughout. The end of each lecture will include a discussion of the molecular mechanisms of selected diseases that relate to the topics covered in the lecture. The course will consist of two lectures per week. This course will be of interest to advanced (3000-4000 level) undergraduates that aim to pursue careers in medicine as well as those that will pursue careers in biomedical research. This course will also be of interest to graduate students desiring an introduction to the cellular physiology of nerve and muscle.

BIOL W5022 Developmental Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005-C2006 or equivalent.

Come discover how the union of egg and sperm triggers the complex cellular interactions that specify the diverse variety of cells present in multicellular organisms. Cellular and molecular aspects of sex determination, gametogenesis, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, telomerase as the biological clock, stem cells, cloning, the pill and cell interactions will be explored, with an emphasis on humans. Original research articles will be discussed to further examine current research in developmental biology. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

BIOL W5034 Biotechnology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: genetics or molecular biology.

The course covers techniques currently used to explore and manipulate gene function and their applications in medicine and the environment. Part I covers key laboratory manipulations, including DNA cloning, gene characterization, association of genes with disease, and methods for studying gene regulation and activities of gene products. Part II also covers commercial applications, and includes animal cell culture, production of recombinant proteins, novel diagnostics, high throughput screening, and environmental biosensors.

BIOL W5041 Cell Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one year of biology, normally BIOL C2005-C2006, or the equivalent.

Cell Biology 3041/4041 is an upper-division course that covers in depth all organelles of cells, how they make up tissues, secrete substances important for the organism, generate and adapt to their working environment in the body, move throughout development, and signal to each other. Because these topics were introduced in the Intro Course (taught by Mowshowitz and Chasin), this course or its equivalent is a pre-requisite for W3041/4041. Students for whom this course is useful include biology, biochem or biomedical engineering majors, those preparing to apply for medical school or graduate school, and those doing or planning to start doing research in a biology or biomedical lab. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

BIOL W5193 Stem Cell Biology and Applications. 3 points.

Corequisites: three semesters of Biology or the instructor’s permission.

The course examines current knowledge and potential medical applications of pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells), direct conversions between cell types and adult, tissue-specific stem cells (concentrating mainly on hematopoietic and gut stem cells as leading paradigms). A basic lecture format will be supplemented by presentations and discussions of research papers. Recent reviews and research papers together with extensive instructor notes will be used in place of a textbook.

BIOL W5799 Readings In the Molecular Biology of Cancer. 3 points.

Tracing the discovery of the role of DNA tumor viruses in cancerous transformation. Oncogenes and tumor suppressors are analyzed with respect to their function in normal cell cycle, growth control, and human cancers. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

BIOT GU4160 Biotechnology Law. 3 points.

Priority given to Biotechnology Program students.

Prerequisites: at least 4 college-level biology or biotechnology courses.

This course will introduce students to the interrelated fields of patent law, regulatory law, and contract law that are vital to the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors. The course will present core concepts in a way that permits students to use them throughout their corporate, academic, and government careers. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOT GU4160
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOT 4160 001/11282 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Alan Morrison 3 4/40

BIOT GU4180 Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 12. Priority given to students in the Masters in Biotechnology Program.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The course examines the entrepreneurial process in biotechnology from idea generation through economic viability. Biotechnology companies are unique in that they need a years-to-decades long period of incubation prior to becoming self-sustaining. Students will be introduced to the steps needed to start and nurture a company, and gain an ability to assess the health of potential collaborators, partners or employers. Topics include an overview of the global biotechnology industry, idea generation, business plan formulation, intellectual property protection, funding, personnel management including board composition, regulatory body interaction, and company exits. Course website: http://biot4180.weebly.com/

Spring 2017: BIOT GU4180
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOT 4180 001/83697 F 9:00am - 10:50am
516 Hamilton Hall
David Sable 3 31/40

BIOT GU4200 Biopharmaceutical Development & Regulation. 3 points.

The program aims to provide current life sciences students with an understanding of what drives the regulatory strategies that surround the development decision making process, and how the regulatory professional may best contribute to the goals of product development and approval. To effect this, we will examine operational, strategic, and commercial aspects of the regulatory approval process for new drug, biologic, and biotechnology products both in the United States and worldwide. The topics are designed to provide a chronological review of the requirements needed to obtain marketing approval. Regulatory strategic, operational, and marketing considerations will be addressed throughout the course. We will examine and analyze the regulatory process as a product candidates are advanced from Research and Development, through pre-clinical and clinical testing, to marketing approval, product launch and the post-marketing phase. The goal of this course is to introduce and familiarize students with the terminology, timelines, and actual steps followed by Regulatory Affairs professionals employed in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry. Worked examples will be explored to illustrate complex topics and illustrate interpretation of regulations.

Fall 2017: BIOT GU4200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOT 4200 001/29666 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Ron Guido 3 49/35

BIOT GU4201 Seminar in Biotechnology Development and Regulation. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOT W4200 (OK without prerequisite).

This course will provide a practical definition of the current role of the Regulatory Professional in pharmaceutical development, approval and post-approval actions. This will be illustrated by exploration, and interactive discussion of regulatory history, its evolution, current standards, and associated processes. The course will seek to clarify the role of Regulatory in development and lifecycle opportunities, demonstrating the value Regulatory adds by participation on research, development and commercial teams. The course will utilize weekly case studies and guest lecturers to provide color to current topical events related to the areas.

Spring 2017: BIOT GU4201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOT 4201 001/60819 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
700 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Ron Guido 3 45/30

BIOT W4161 Ethics in Biopharmaceutical Patent and Regulatory Law. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW (BIOT W4160)

Course Objective This course – the first of its kind at Columbia – introduces students to a vital subfield of ethics focusing on patent and regulatory law in the biotech and pharmaceutical sectors. The course combines lectures, structured debate and research to best present this fascinating and nuanced subject. Successful completion of Biotechnology Law (W4160) is a course prerequisite, since properly exploring this branch of bioethics requires an indepth understanding of biotech and pharmaceutical patent and regulatory law.

The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors as may become necessary.