Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology offers courses in cultural anthropology, culture and language, the origins in human society, and human evolution.

For questions about specific courses, contact the department:

Departmental Office: 452 Schermerhorn Extension
212-854-4552
Office Hours: Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Web: www.columbia.edu/cu/anthropology


Directory of Classes

The course information displayed on this page relies on an external system and may be incomplete. Please visit Anthropology on the Directory of Classes for complete course information.

After finding your course in the Directory of Classes, click on the section number to open an expanded view. The "Open To" field will indicate whether the course is open to School of Professional Studies students. If School of Professional Studies is not included in the field, students may still be able to cross-register for the course by obtaining permission after being admitted to an academic program.


ANTH BC3868 Ethnographic Field Research in New York City. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Recommended for majors prior to the senior year. Open to non-majors by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

A seminar-practicum on field research in New York City. Exploration of anthropological field research methods followed by supervised individual field research on selected topics in urban settings.

Spring 2017: ANTH BC3868
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3868 001/01187 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
214 Milbank Hall
Lesley Sharp 4 8/15

ANTH G4003 Controversial Topics in Human Evolution: Genetics and Behavior II. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

       

ANTH G4008 Governing Socialist and Post-Socialist Transformation. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines post-Soviet transformation of the distinctive socialist project of social modernity. Beginning from a conceptual basis in the work of Michael Foucault, Alexander Gerschenkron, and Karl Polanyi, examines "transition" anthropologically, both as a secular process of transformation and as an apparatus involved in "transitioning." Investigates the process of transition as one example of what Ulrich Beck has called "reflexive modernization" involving the rationalization and reform of distinctive modern ways of life.

ANTH G4010 Philosophical Anthropology and Philosophy In Anthropology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduces western philosophers whose writings and ideas have, explicitly or implicitly, had a significant effect on methodology and theory of human sciences. Readings include works by Sextus Empericus, Rene Descartes, David Hume, John Lock, Immanuel Kant, Charles Peirce, G.W.F. Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Martin Heidegger. Philosophical works read in tandem with anthropological writings.

ANTH G4012 Philanthropic Anthropology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

From its beginnings as a discipline, in the late 19th century, the field of anthropology and its practitioners, anthropologists, have played an interesting, often controversial role in colonial projects, racial debates, cultural and economic development, and military campaigns. Explores the connections between funding for research and the topics and the theoretical frames which emerged. Focuses on anthropology as it developed in the US and Britain. The term philanthropy broadly construed, to include both private foundations as well as governmental funding agencies.

ANTH G4029 Holy Lands, Unholy Histories: Archaeology Before the Bible (formerly V3007). 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: undergraduate students must get the instructor's permission.

The prehistory of the Near East (or the Levant - the geographical area from Lebanon in the north to the Sinai Desert in the south, and from the middle Euphrates in Syria to southern Jordan) has been constructed over the last 80 years by a number of different research traditions. The first professional archaeological research carried out in the region can be traced to the post-First World War British and French Mandates. It was not until the 1960s that indigenous research began to make a substantial contribution to the prehistory of the region, but the colonial legacy remains influential even today. Extensive fieldwork over the last 30 years or so may have supplied a vast and rich database, but the fundamental categories of research have remained virtually unchanged since the establishment of the Levantine prehistoric sequence by archaeologists such as Dorothy Garrod in the 1930s. Our critical approach in this course will show how the richness and quality of the data lend themselves to rigorous theoretical analysis.

ANTH G4045 Temporalities: Archaeological Approaches to Time. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

                              The concept of the passage of time is a foundational theoretical space which underpins all archaeological work. Over the past thirty years, the discipline of anthropology has absorbed a good deal of continental critique regarding monolithic or objective epistemologies of time, as well as critiques of the inherently teleological or progressive aspect of time. Yet there has been little emphasis on an explicit methodological survey or training for archaeological scholars seeking to orient themselves within these literatures. This has resulted in a disciplinary engagement with the past that frequently omits to chart a clear course or articulate explicitly the sorts of issues at stake in adopting one or another form of historical narrative. This course is intended as an introductory critical survey of different anthropological and philosophical approaches to temporality and will be valuable for all students who seek a more reflexive engagement with their production of the past.

ANTH G4050 Popular Religion in East Asia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines popular religious practices and beliefs in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. By focusing on the "popular" rather than on textual traditions such as Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism this course examines how an often common vocabulary of ritual, cosmology, ancestors, and gods is translated into different understandings and enactments in different social and historical milieus. The course considers the historical role of religion and ritual in East Asian states, the consequences of this legacy under different modernizing regimes, and includes topical coverage of contemporary practices.

ANTH G4051 Museums in the City. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course considers the "work" of museums and why museums seem to be essential to cities. Museums preserve particular moments in time and maintain a selective social memory. They bring together heterogeneous urban dwellers, often in school groups but also as adults, and create citizens. Students will do fieldwork in several different museums to elucidate the specific messages presented in each. Particularly suited for those in Museum Anthropology and/or Urban Studies

ANTH G4055 Buddhism and the visionary experience: a comparative study. 3 points.

Cross-listed with Religion.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar in effect deals with issues I have been dreaming about for some time and hopefully I will derive inspiration from student presentations so that I will have a first draft of a book by the end of the semester. Following my ethnographic prejudice we will focus on specific case studies of visionaries wherever possible and elicit theoretical discussions from these studies. The main thrust of the seminar is to deal with forms of thought that by-pass the Cartesian primacy of consciousness as exemplified by his dictum, "I think, I am.

ANTH G4056 Object Histories. 3 points.

 In this course, we will "think things"-endeavoring to understand objects and the social, historical, and political worlds in which they are embedded. We will consider how anthropologists and historians have made efforts to study the material world, exploring how objects connect people across time and space, and plumbing the varied ways that humans have been and continue to be entangled with objects. Throughout, we will remain attentive to Aimé Césaire's contention that "colonization = thingification," and will discuss how the status of person, for some, has differed little from the status of object. Each student will choose a discrete object for independent study (and "implosion"), with which they will work over the course of the semester.

ANTH G4065 Archaeology of Idols. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores 40,000 years of the human creation of, entanglement with, enchantment by, and violence toward idols. Case studies roam from the Paleolithic to Petra and from the Hopi to the Taliban, all the while placing the sculpted, painted, or otherwise constructed devotional objects of the past into dialogue with contemporary social theory on the problem of representation, iconoclash, fetishism and the sacred.

ANTH G4078 Clues, Signs, and Traces: Archaeology and Semiotics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

As archaeologists living in the present we cannot engage directly with 'the past'; instead we deal with the material traces left by the practices of past people, and use these traces to create narratives about what we believe they represent. If we can know past practices at all, it is only through the signs we perceive inhering in the material evidence before us. This class will consider different semiotic approaches in archaeology to explore how archaeological narratives have emerged as mediating discourses located somewhere between past and the present, and in the relation between signs and objects. We will focus in particular on archaeological approaches to the semiotics of landscape and place.

ANTH G4085 Athens Imagined: The Space of Politics and the Politics of Space. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

    The city of Athens has occupied a specific and symbolic space in modern European thought that transcends the place itself to produce a space of deep meaning where different significations of "Westerness" occur. From "the beginning of civilization" to "a backward small village," Athens has been enveloped in the visions of an increasingly decentralized global imaginary about what constitutes modernity and Europeanness. In this course we will look at the parameters that were responsible for the creation of Athens as an imagine space.  

ANTH G4100 An Introduction To the Ethnography of South Asia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines of some of the challenges involved in writing about this diverse and complex region by juxtaposing ethnographies and monographs with novels and autobiographies. 

ANTH G4113 Religion, Media, Anthropology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

             

ANTH G4114 Religion and Media. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class analyzes the role of mediation in religious practice. Reading theories of media and of religion we will examine how transformations in media technology shift the ways in which religion is encoded into semiotic forms, how these forms are realized in performative contexts and how these affect the constitution of religious subjects and religious authority. Topics include word, print, image, and sound in relation to Islam, Pentecostalism, Buddhism and animist religions

ANTH G4115 The Anthropology of the Indian Sub-continent. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G4116 Who Cares? Sympathy, Liberalism and the Conduct of Care. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar examines the distribution and obligations of care under late liberalism. We work from classical approaches to human sentiment (e.g. Hume, Adam Smith) to explore the relationship of forms of care {management, empathy) to different modes of statecraft. In particular we examine links between imperial colonialism and liberal democracy in terms of different techniques of administering social difference (e.g. race, multiculturalism, class, population, ...). We critically investigate the role of the discipline of anthropology within this rubric and read several ethnographies that dwell on the interrelation of care and vulnerability. Across tbe course, we scrutinize what types of subjects care, for whom, and to what effect.

ANTH G4118 Settler Colonialism in North America. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20 and instructor's permission. Upper level ugrads with background in poli theory and anthropological theory

This course examines the relationship between colonialism, settlement and anthropology and the specific ways in which these processes have been engaged in the broader literature and locally in North America. We aim to understand colonialism as a theory of political legitimacy, as a set of governmental practices and as a subject of inquiry. Thus we will re-imagine North America in light of the colonial project and its ?technologies of rule? such as education, law and policy that worked to transform Indigenous notions of gender, property and territory. Our case studies will dwell in several specific areas of inquiry, among them: the Indian Act in Canada and its transformations of gender relations, governance and property; the residential and boarding school systems in the US and Canada, the murdered and missing women in Juarez and Canada and the politics of allotment in the US. Although this course will be comparative in scope, it will be grounded heavily within the literature from Native North America.

ANTH G4129 Landscape: Interpreting Place. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

                          Understanding how people inhabit and make sense of the physical world is fundamental to any understanding of human society. This class will explore different archaeological perspectives on the creation and inhabitation of place by reading archaeological accounts together with material from anthropology, architecture, art history, geography and social theory.

ANTH G4143 Accusation. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the politics and practices of collective accusation in comparative perspective. It treats these phenomena in their relation to processes of political and economic transition, to discourses of crisis, and to the practices of rule by which the idea of exception is made the grounds for extreme claims on and for the social body?usually, but not exclusively, enacted through forms of expulsion. We will consider the various theoretical perspectives through which forms of collective accusation have been addressed, focusing on psychoanalytic, structural functional, and poststructuralist readings. In doing so, we will also investigate the difference and possible continuities between the forms and logics of accusation that operate in totalitarian as well as liberal regimes. Course readings will include both literary and critical texts.

ANTH G4147 Human Skeletal Biology I. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15. Recommended for archaeology, physical anthropology, premedical, and biology students interested in the human skeletal system.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Intensive study of human skeletal materials using anatomical and anthropological landmarks to assess sex, age, and ethnicity of the bones. Other primate skeletal material and fossil casts are used for comparative study.

ANTH G4151 Late Imperial China. 3 points.

May be taken separately or in conjunction with ANTH G4165.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Traditional Chinese society during the most recent Imperial period.  Major emphasis on kinship, religion, local organization, stratification, and the relationship between local and national patterns of social organization

ANTH G4155 Doing 'Tradition' and 'Modernity' in Korea. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to Korean social structure: family, household, lineage, village, regional linkages, passage rites, and folk religion. The modern transformation of family, marriage, community life, and receptions of the past Yangban and folk ideals. 

ANTH G4156 The Korean Shaman Lens: Anthropology, Medicine, Popular Religion & Performance. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Undergraduates must get instructor's permission.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Using Korea shamans as a central case study, this course explores the multiple ways anthropologists and others have researched, written about, and filmed "Shamans" from late 19th century ethnologists and missionaries to late 20th century western "neo-shamans." Students will be introduced to a variety of scholarly approaches to the study of popular religion world-wide. We will examine why the term "shaman" is used as a comparative category and how "shamans" function as healers and performers of popular culture. We will consider histories of persecution and also instances where shamans have come to be regarded as cultural icons.

ANTH G4157 The Anthropology of Rock Art. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will consider a wide range of rock art from across the world, such as cave paintings from Paleolithic Europe, aboriginal petroglyphs, and graffiti in contemporary urban are­as. Drawing on key articles on distinguished sites, we will work towards discerning and critically examining the epistemological proposals regarding pictorial meaning reproduced in the interpretations. Central questions to be discussed are: What axiomatic views of recognition and perception inform ethnographic or neurological analogies? What assumptions regarding image-making and bodily practices are being reproduced in different methods of dating rock art? Lastly, how is rock art research interrelated with art-theoretical paradigms, such as Pla­ to's theory of mimesis, modernist aestheticism and institutional criticism? After the course, students will be familiar with focal rock art sites, and will also have improved their capacity to distinguish, compare, and contrast different theoretical positions regarding the utilization of imagery in archeology and anthropology.

ANTH G4158 Survey of South American Archaeology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prehistory of the native culture from the first peopling of the continent in the period of white settlement, with emphasis on the higher cultures. 

ANTH G4168 NOISE/SOUND ARCHAEOLOGY: EXCURSIONS INTO THE AURAL PAST. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The world of sight is more readily preserved than the world of sound. Visual depictions of landscapes endure more than aural enactments of soundscapes. However, in the past, key social values may have been reproduced as much by filling spaces with sound as by depicting places on cave walls. Noise, sound and music can create and organize space, mark time, define identity, through rituals which assure people of their place in the world and advance a political program for the future. This interdisciplinary (anthropology, ethnomusicology, philosophy, urban studies) graduate seminar looks at the social uses of sound and music technologies.

ANTH G4174 Thesis Writing Seminar in Indegineous Studies. 3 points.

Advanced undergraduates with instructor's permission only.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: advanced courses in anthropological theory and Native Studies.

This course will expand and nuance students’ existing understanding of the burgeoning field of Indigenous studies and “settler colonial studies” -- the examination of the social, political and historical process of dispossession and settler possession through time and its effects, meanings and engagements by Indigenous peoples and politics as well through time. Readings traverse the fields of anthropology, history, women and gender studies, native studies, American, Canadian, Australian and African Studies as well as queer studies. In addition to a reading seminar this is also a writing seminar and student will expect to do both for the entirety of the course.  This advanced, weekly undergraduate/graduate seminar will augment student’s existing knowledge of Indigenous and Settler Colonial studies. These advanced level texts will assist students in the writing of their theses in Indigenous and Settler Colonial studies. The course seeks to complement, not supplant, existing thesis seminars and is offered to those who are writing either theses in these topics or those who seek to produce an original, thesis-like research paper in this subject areas in preparation for graduate study.

ANTH G4191 Evolution of the State In Prehistory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Theories dealing with the origin, development, and maintenance of complex societies in prehistory as seen against the background provided by an examination of specific archaeological data. 

ANTH G4194 Oil Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G4197 Life Cycle Rituals and the State in Central Asia. 3 points.

Enrollment limit is 25. Enrollment priorities: Graduate students and qualified undergraduatesNot offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course focuses on life cycle rituals and their complex relations with state institutions in Central Asia, including the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in China. It will be particularly concerned with the celebrations accompanying life cycle rituals and their economic significance, especially in the phase of transformation and renegotiation of Central Asian economies and societies after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the reform eradevelopments in Chinese Central Asia (1979-present). The historical setting shall be introduced in the early sessions. The course then, like a classical thick description, continues by examining the celebrations themselves and their significance for people on the ground to view this from different analytical perspectives as the course proceeds. The red thread remains the actual custom itself which is seen through a range of different perspectives.

ANTH G4200 Fossil Evidence of Human Evolution. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 12.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ANEB V1010 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Intended for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students who are interested in paleoanthropology. Provides a closer look at what comprises the fossil evidence for human evolution from the australopithecines of 4 million years ago to the fully modern human species of 25,000 years ago. Involves hands-on examination of the departmental casts.

ANTH G4210 The Ancient Andes: The Inkas and their Ancestors. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the nature and history of Andean societies from the first human occupation through the earliest cities, states, and empires, to the advent of European contact. The social, political, ideological, economic, and military processes that were central to the emergence of early civilization are examined through archaeological and historical sources.

ANTH G4220 The Social Production of Technologies. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The last three decades have seen profound changes in the ways in which anthropologists approach the study of past technologies and techniques of material culture production and use. At the heart of these changes is the acknowledgement that technology is a social production, with many researchers now focusing on the social agency of techniques and technologies. With explicit focus on the engendered human body as the agent of historical change, this interdisciplinary course offers a critical history of social technologies. Case studies from prehistoric periods, the Roman Empire, and medieval and modern Europe will draw upon current research in ethnology, sociology, gender studies, queer theory, human-animal relations, ethnomusicology and the history and philosophy of science.

ANTH G4244 Arab Society and Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G4246 The Politics of Reproduction. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 12.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course focuses on reproductive politics in the global context and in comparative perspectives. Through comparative case studies, we will examine how cultural, moral, and political values give meaning to human reproductive events and inform people's uses of medical technologies' Drawing on case materials from a variety of societies, we will study how competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions influence reproductive arrangements in society. We focus on how technological mediations of fertility, pregnancy' and birth (e.g., contraception, abortion, in vitro fertilization, prenatal testing, etc.) offer opportunities for the formation ofgender and kinship, the reproduction ofsocial inequalities, and the implementation of national population and intemational development agendas. We will further interrogate how bioethical evaluation ofreproductive technologies might take into account the motivations and experiences of actual users.

ANTH G4290 Masculinities. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines how masculinities are constructed, performed and inhabitied. Key foci include theorization of the masculine subject in both psychodynamic and political terms within colonial and modernizing discursive contexts; the role of scholarship and the media in constituting hegemonic, subaltern, ethnic and stigmatized masculinities; and the issue of genered citizenship. 

ANTH G4325 Semiotic Technologies (formerly: The Linguistic Anthropology of Artificial Languages). 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Treats the digital and computational mediation of meaning, through the lens of classic texts in linguistic anthropology, critical theory, media studies, and computer science.

ANTH G4343 From the Ground Up: Explanation, Evidence, and Ethics In Archaeology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An overview of philosophical issues raised in and by archaeology.  Focal topics include: debate about the scientific status of archaeology; interpretive versus explanatory goals; conceptions of evidence and standards of inference; issues of professional accountability, conservation and stewardship.  (some background in archaeology and/or philosophy of science is recommended

ANTH G4345 Neanderthal Alterities. 3 points.

Enrollment priorities: Graduate students, and 3rd & 4th year undergraduates only

Using "The Neanderthals" partly as a metaphorical device, this course considers the anthropological, philosophical and ethical implications of sharing the world with another human species. Beginning from a solid grounding in the archaeological, biological and genetic evidence, we will reflect critically on why Neanderthals are rarely afforded the same reflexive capacities, qualities and attributes - agency- as anatomically modern humans, and why they are often regarded as "lesser" or nonhuman animals despite clear evidence for both sophisticated material and social engagement with the world and its resources. Readings/materials are drawn from anthropology, philosophy, ethics, gender studies, race and genetics studies, literature and film.

ANTH G4360 Archaeological Field School. 4 Pts. N. Rothschild. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 8.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Relationship between archaeological data and organization of life on the Zuni Reservation; archaeological techniques to evaluate several farming villages located near the pueblo are used; reading for background, some lectures, and a paper on one aspect of the research. Course lasts four weeks, during July. 

ANTH G4361 Ethical Issues in Museums. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 14.

Ethical questions about museum activities are legion, yet they are usually only discussed when they become headlines in newspapers. At the same time, people working in museums make decisions with ethical and legal issues regularly and seldom give these judgments even little thought. In part, this is due to the fact that many of these decisions are based upon values that become second nature. This course will explore ethical issues that arise in all areas of a museum's operations from governance and management to collections acquisition, conservation, and deaccessioning. We will also examine the issues that arise when the ownership of objects in a museum's are questioned and the ethical considerations involved in retention, restitution and repatriation.

ANTH G4377 House. Home, Project. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 18.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar introduces students to anthropology's rich tradition of theorizing about spatiality through three themes: “House,” “Home” and “Project.” Each theme represents how anthropologists and anthropological thinkers have approached the spatial dimensions of domestic life, architecture and quotidian experience. By tracing the presence of houses, homes and housing-related projects throughout anthropological thought, students will consider how anthropology contributes to comprehensive theories of spatiality, as well as to varied interrogations of bodily practice, memory, affect and the governance of social well-being.

ANTH G4390 Borders and Boundaries. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This graduate seminar focuses on the relationship between international borders and social boundaries within national societies. It has as its premise a double paradox of contemporary life: the hardening of ethnic and racial boundaries at a time when goods and information flow across national borders quite freely; and the racialization of social relations at a time when racial theories lack scientific prestige, and racial categories have become conspicuously unstable. The seminar explores anthropological, historical, political and aesthetic dimensions of the relationship between national borders and social boundaries in a comparative context, and develops a conceptual foundation for analysis of the relationship between borders and boundaries.

ANTH G4470 Humans and Other Animals: Critical Perspectives on Human-animal Relations. 3 points.

Students must contact Professor Boyd (brian.boyd@columbia.edu) via email before you registering. Enrollment limit is 30.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In a number of academic disciplines the concern with relationships between humans and non-humans has recently resulted in a radical revision of the ways in which we think people and animals construct their social worlds. This course addresses how humans and animals enter into, and interact within, each other’s worlds. It draws upon perspectives from anthropology, geography, (political) philosophy, ethics, literary theory, and the sciences, placing current debates within the context of the deep history of human-animal relations. Topics to be discussed include “wildness”, domestication, classification, animal rights, biotechnology, “nature/culture”, food/cooking, fabulous/mythical animals, the portrayal of animals in popular culture, and human-animal sexualities.

ANTH G4480 Critical Native and Indigenous Studies. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is an interdisciplinary survey of the literature and issues that comprise Native American and Indigenous Studies. Readings for this course are organized around the concepts of indigeneity, coloniality, power and "resistance" and concomitantly interrogate these concepts for social and cultural analysis. The syllabus is derived from some of the "classic" and canonical works in Native American Studies such as Custer Died for Your Sins but will also require an engagement with less canonical works such as Red Man's Appeal to Justice in addition to historical, ethnographic and theoretical contributions from scholars that work outside of Native American and Indigenous Studies. This course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. 

ANTH G4513 The Next City: Speculation, Techonology, Nostalgia. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the various ways in which cities are planned, represented and navigated, and interrogates collectively imagined forms of social life and order as they are reflected in urban design. By pairing fiction, film and documentaries with readings from anthropology, sociology, history and literary criticim, we will discuss the role of planning, speculation, technology and nostalgia in defining and conceptualizing the city.

ANTH G4520 Race and the Articulation of Difference. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Interrelation of race, gender and nation in the formation of hierarchical social systems and their legitimating ideologies. Situates the process of racialization within the wider problematic of political subjectivity and direct attention to the symbolic and structural organization of modern, hierarchical social systems. 

ANTH G4526 Gift and Fetish. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Ethnographic and philosophic comparison of gift and fetish using Mauss, Marx, Derrida, Benjamin, and Bataille. 

ANTH G4552 Magic of the State. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Inquiry into the assumption that (modern) stately power owes much to an aura composed at the intersection of reason and violence. Assumes that authority has mystical foundations. The famous arbitrariness of power (Kafka). How to write/represent such arbitrariness. Genet, Weber, Ben Anderson, Bataille, Foucault, Kafka, Miguel Angel Asturias, Nietzsche, Jean Franco.

ANTH G4620 Women, Power and the State In East Asian Society. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The varied and changing circumstances of women's lives in China, Korea, Japan, and Taiwan in light of common traditionalist discourses concerning women as well as the varied social, economic, political, and symbolic structures that inform women's lives in East Asia today. Topics include Asian women perceived, women and modernity, family and state, marriage, work, sexuality, and resistance. 

ANTH G4631 Brazilian Feminism, National Politics and International propositions. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is a contribution for an anthropological study of the historical, social and cultural context of the development of feminism in Brazil since the seventies. At the same time, it is a contribution for a comparative study of feminist movements as women's movements centered on "women's issues" and "gender issues". The focus is on a Brazilian feminist movement that can be considered, depending on the perspective, as a feminism movement in a "Third World" society, a "south" society, a society in development or, as a Western feminist women's movement. We will problematize and challenge this terminology beyond the north/south-gap on economic development and social inequality thus reinforcing the idea of the possible proximity of these movements as effects arising from the same new political values given by the social movements to national cultural, color and ethnic diversity, and as effects derived from the historical constitution of some consensus on the agenda of the international feminist movement in order to fight the "new" conservative (fundamentalist) forces against feminism internationally articulated. From another angle, we will pay attention to all differences on traditional cultures that permit us to see the peculiar and different ways of national feminisms and their forms of struggle and organization strategies. The hegemonic institutionalized traditional culture in Brazil and Hispanic Latin America is the result of Iberian institutional cultures, with effects on judicial and legal institutions.

ANTH G4639 History and Anthropology. 3 points.

Enrollment limit is 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The relationship between history and anthropology has been both harmonious and conflicted. In anthropology, for example, the rise of structuralist theory and methods was predicated on turning the discipline's back to history. Later, Marxist criticisms of structuralist and interactionist approaches relied entirely on historical analysis to debunk and reframe the significance of distorted conclusions. For their part, historians have appealed to anthropology to frame internal fractures between social history and political, diplomatic and economic history; between the Annales tradition and its mentalitees offshoot; and between cultural history and social history. This course tracks productive combinations of the methods and preoccupations of the two disciplines.

ANTH G4643 Politics, Culture and Identity in Contemporary Taiwan. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

It is virtually impossible to approach Taiwanese society without encountering on this path actions, discourses and representations closely connected to identity issues, whether they be of a national, local, ethnic or cultural order. This course will examine through different aspects of Taiwan's social life, ranging from electoral culture, social networking, cultural policies, ritual and place, history and memories, nature and imagined territories, the fluid expressions and complex stakes of identity.

ANTH G4711 Historical Archaeology of North America. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Development of historical archaeology from the 1940s to the present; covering method and theory; colonial and post-colonial periods; urban, plantation, industrial, and domestic archaeology; and various regions of North America. 

ANTH G4886 Signs and Wonders. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: advanced undergraduates may enroll with the instructor's permission.

This course explores the dynamic interplay between "signs" - as evidence, knowledge, meaning, rationality - and "wonder(s)" - as passion, affect, sensation, but also as object, phenomenon, catalyst, and event - across a plurality of sites and registers: medieval theology, early modern science, the colonial encounter; skepticism, mysticism, demonology, and fascism; psychoanalysis, art, poetry, film; digitality, virtuality, and special effects; Enlightenment Europe, evangelical America, postcolonial Africa, and beyond. What does wonder look like at the interface of madness, terror, and the sublime? What is this passion, this pathos, that can lead both to tireless critical inquiry and to unquestioning, indeed totalitarian, discipleship? How do signs and wonders (e.g., the "shock and awe" of U.S. bombing campaigns) become political technologies? At the outer reaches of knowability, how have marvels, wonders, miracles, and monstrosities been constructed, sensed, mastered, and mass-mediatized in different times and places? And finally, if, as Socrates believed, philosophy begins in wonder, can we say the same for anthropology? What exactly is the sensation of anthropology's encounter with its worlds? Along with ethnographic and historical texts, readings will include Lévi-Strauss, Viveiros de Castro, Lingis, Daston and Park, Malabou, Benjamin, Sebald, Tarde, Deleuze, and Canetti.

ANTH G4995 Contemporary Japan: Aesthetics, Politics, Technology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Designed for graduate students who want to deepen their knowledge of contemporary Japan. Topics may include mass culture and everyday life; the resurgence of neonationalism; World War II in fantasy and memory; education and children; new aesthetic forms in architecture, photography, music and the graphic arts; religion and spirituality; crime and terrorism. Centers on close readings of texts and provides ample time for students to pursue specialized projects developed in consultation with the professor. 

ANTH G6000 History of Anthropological Thought and Practice. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines a selection of key texts in the history of anthropology and the conditions in which they (1) once had but no longer do have much significance in the discipline and (2) once were and still are significant for this field of study

ANTH G6001 The Production of the Past I. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Guest lecturers and pre- and post-doctoral fellows. Seminar investigates different genres and histories of history, to take history as the primary text of modern life, and the foundational basis for state and nation, society and community. From old regime at the time of the French Revolution to the former Soviet Empire, from the postcolonial nations of Africa and India to Japan, from national histories to histories of resistance, from questions concerning the transformation of history in an age of globalization to the enduring, and always troubled, relationship between history and atrocity.

ANTH G6002 The Production of the Past II. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Guest lecturers and pre- and post-doctoral fellows. Seminar investigates different genres and histories of history, to take history as the primary text of modern life, and the foundational basis for state and nation, society and community. From old regime at the time of the French Revolution to the former Soviet Empire, from the postcolonial nations of Africa and India to Japan, from national histories to histories of resistance, from questions concerning the transformation of history in an age of globalization to the enduring, and always troubled, relationship between history and atrocity.

ANTH G6003 Nietzsche and the Shaman's Body. 3 points.

Instructor's Permission Required

Beginning with an exploration of the shaman's body in ethnographyand its relation to seeing, to knowing, and to changing the world,this course aims to study Nietzsche with a view to understandingunderstanding and its relation to the body--of the person and ofthe world.

ANTH G6004 Economy and Society in Prehistory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Comparative study of economic formations in prehistory. Topics include hunting and gathering and farming subsistence; non-market exchange systems; markets and money; specialized production; the social economy of consumption; and domestic and political economies in state society.

ANTH G6005 The Anthropology of the Subject. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The construction of persons as subjects in and agents of culture and history.  Theories of culture personhood (subjection, agency, individuality, etc.), persons as cultural critics, and the relationship between personhood and cultural transformation

ANTH G6007 Colonial Encounters and the Powers of Writing. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Relationship between writing and power under colonial and postcolonial conditions. The politics of translation, religious interpretation, prophecy and historiography, ethnographic voice, nationalism and narration, and shifts in conventions of representation and literary production

ANTH G6012 The Anthropology of Violence. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6014 Preemptive Apocalyptic Thought. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

    Like inoculation, this graduate seminar is meant to use apocalytpic fiction, film, and history, so as to ward off and better understand the temptation to indulge in apocalyptic fantasies at this scary time of global crisis. What truth is there in Fredric Jameson's statement that it is easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism?

ANTH G6015 Anthropologies and Photographies. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Attempts to negotiate a path between ontological and historical theories of photography in order to understand the documentary impulse in anthropology and its relationship to the magicality of photography. A wide variety of historical texts, supplemented by visual documents

ANTH G6017 Specular Economies: Anthropology of Late Capitalism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The politics of representation in ethnographically particular contexts in order to understand how contemporary economic forms are informed by more general logics of visibility. Materials from Southeast Asia on the ways the forms of occulted economies change over time and how the values of transparency have come to dominate the discourses of political value.

ANTH G6018 Anthropology in Theory. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ANTH G6601 or the instructor's permission.

This course is intended for advanced doctoral students and is addressed to the question of interdisciplinarity as it relates to anthropology.   How does anthropology -- its discourses, concepts, methods, and theoretical interventions – travel outside of the discipline?  What do other disciplines and interdisciplinary formations, such as history, literary criticism, philosophy and cultural studies, ask of anthropology, and how do their practitioners deploy the questions and the knowledges generated within anthropology for their own purposes?  How does the auto-critical project that has been internal to the discipline function beyond its boundaries?  To what ends and purposes is anthropology asked to produce knowledge of the other-as-object? And how does this demand inflect the conceptual project carried out within the discipline?  These questions animate this course.  At a time in which ‘area studies’ have been reformulated to answer to the real-historical conditions of re-regionalization, and against the backdrop of several decades of institutional and intellectual reform under the name of ‘interdisciplinarity,’ this course provides students with an opportunity to reflect critically and specifically on the itineraries of their discipline and its place in a changed and changing milieu. Our discussions will focus on: the idea of the anthropological type, the question of kinship, the concept of the gift and, especially, the idea of other 'ontologies '.

ANTH G6019 Recording Angels. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Traces connections between machineries of the modern and fields or cultural production.  Crisscrossing late-19th/early-20th century technologies (in colonial sugar refineries, electricity, railways, silent cinema, radio, the gramophone) and cultural concerns (sacrifice, theater, exorcism, narration, music, religion), pursues shadows of an emergent modern subject

ANTH G6020 Social Poetics of Circulation. 3 points.

ANTH G6025 The Ethnographic Field: Sexuality and Text. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine the dialogue between articulations of gender and sexuality and anthropological knowledge as manufactured through fieldwork and the texts that emerge from that anthropological journey. Explores the nature of the postmodern 'other' in anthropological texts, and traces the role of gender and sexuality in that production

ANTH G6027 Imagining Otherness In Operatic Dramas. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Through the analytical works of Said, Levin, Heidegger and McClary, looks at some of the ways that opera, in expansionary post-1850s Western Europe, becomes a site imagining others as a signifier of a surrogate self (sexual and cultural). Explore the kinds of looking and the configurations of collectivity and personhood that three operas--Turandot, Aida, Carmen--help elaborate, the fora in which they are presented, and whether back talk is possible within them.

ANTH G6028 MASTERY OF NON-MASTERY. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

that yielding water in motion, gets the better in the end of granite and porphyry.  Focusing on specific instances of craft as resistance to the speed-up in our work and lives, this seminar explores the possibilities for a new ethic and practical relationship between technology and nature, not as domination but as a continuous unwinding of such domination that I call, following Benjamin and Bataille, “the mastery of non-mastery.” Drawing on an anthropology of mimesis, metamorphosis, and the bodily unconscious,  such unwinding includes perusal of Hegel’s chapter on master and slave, Mauss’ “Techniques of the Body,” and discussion of the trick as in shamanic conjuring and fictocriticism.

ANTH G6030 Transnational Perspectives On Race and Ethnicity. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The political, social and cultural consequences of thinking about the concepts of race and ethnicity outside the U.S. and the borders that these ideas continually traverse.  Asks historical questions about how the meaning of race, the construction of ethnicity and the constitution of nationality have changed over time and have varied through categories such a "diaspora," "exile," "cosmopolitanism," and "migration."  Resituates a number of works outside their own geographical boundaries, imagines a difference scenario of displacement, and reexamines single disciplinary knowledges of anthropology, history and literary criticism

ANTH G6031 Contesting the Past. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course provides a panoramic, but intensive, inquiry into the ways that archaeology and its methods for understanding the world have been marshaled for debate in issues of public interest, and how alternative approaches or claims to the past are presented. It is designed to examine claims to knowledge of the past through the lenses of alternative epistemes and a series of case-based problems that range from the academic to the political, legal, cultural, romantic, and fraudulent.

ANTH G6032 Gender, Sexuality, and Embodiment. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines ancient data in terms of evidence for culturally specific notions of genders, constructed categories of sexuality as well as the experience of embodiment.  Sexuality is analyzed in a similar way, drawing on evidence from ancient Egypt to the Americas, viewed other ways of being in specific ancient contexts

ANTH G6034 Representations. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

 Examines the role of writing, viewing and representation in terms of ancient data as well as in the modern discipline of archaeology; various aspects of narrative, iconography and presentation of the past in archaeological discourse

ANTH G6036 Ethnography of the Nation State. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Through a close analysis of anthropological works, this seminar examines possible ways of doing ethnography in and of "the nation." Readings include ethnographies of ethnicity and race; cultural production, including media and museums; and nationalist narratives and memory.

ANTH G6037 Biography and Autobiography: A Portrait of South African Intellectuals. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Portraits are created to represent the likeness of a chosen subject. The writing of biographies and autobiographies has long been the preferred method through which South African intellectuals have written about their or others' political, intellectual, personal or notorious lives. This course is an examination of how the practice of biographical and autobiographical writing emerged and solidified in South African literature in part to compensate for the paucity of biographical writing but also as a substitute for a nuanced or critical engagement with the chequered and complex history of the country's intellectual and cultural inheritance. In particular, the course will consider the mediatory role of the biographer who, in the case of South Africa, often constructed a biographical subject through an ethnographic method of interviewing, translating and then representing the subject.

ANTH G6038 Place, Space, Nature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This class examines the social production of space, place, and nature. Three discursive and material fields that must be understood if we are to practice a conceptually rigorous and politically engaged contemporary anthropology. In the course we will examine how these fields have recently been studied, described, conceptualized, and theorized.  We will explore these ideas through the reading of works by anthropologists, historians, and geographers, looking at how the changing nature of places affects both the discipline of anthropology and the ways in which anthropologists conduct research in places.

ANTH G6040 The Anthropology of Material Culture: an Archaeological Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Recently, material culture studies have become part of anthropological discourse. Explores some of the different ways in which societies use material culture. Examples from prehistoric and historical archaeology as well as socio-cultural anthropology

ANTH G6042 The Social Practice of Media. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Electronic media are crucial to the ways that symbolic forms circulate in the contemporary world creating new modes of belonging and imagining and new forms of political action and publicness. Overview of the intensifying theoretical engagement between anthropology and media

ANTH G6044 The Production of Space. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores the proposition that space must be apprehended as a social relation in itself, which must therefore, be produced and reproduced, as well as reformulated and transformed. Differences and inequality produced across various spatial scales, e.g., urban, regional, national, and transnational, and heuristic but ideologically burdened oppositions of scale, e.g., rural-urban, center-periphery, and global-local.

ANTH G6045 Foundations in Social Inequality. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Inequality is, arguably, the major research problem of both anthropology and sociology. Whether one is interested in power, complexity, ethnicity, class, caste, gender, colonialism, the state, identity, economics, politics, religion, or some other such phenomenon, the propensity of humans to draw lines of division between groups and assign different moral evaluations to these groups is a fundamental issue with which one must contend. In this seminar, we will explore a variety of socially constructed systems of inequality (economic, moral, political, religious, etc.), and the variable processes by which they were curtailed, constructed, naturalized and/or dismantled. While the state may be viewed as exhibiting the most extreme human manifestations of inequality, our focus will be on non-state and pre-state contexts in an attempt to understand the early genealogies of marginalization and dominance. Particular attention will be paid to the so-called egalitarian societies that have been used by generations of scholars as evidence of a natural default mode that would-be leaders struggled to overcome. In the course of these investigations, we will grapple with core questions such as: Is egalitarianism a natural or original condition for human groups or an evolutionary aberration? How did gender inequalities develop in small-scale societies, and how was their development related to inequalities in the political sphere? Did the institutionalization of religiously based inequities precede or serve as a model for systems of economic dominance? Were some inequalities propelled by the aggrandizing machinations of would-be exploiters? Were others the unanticipated consequences of short-term actions compounded over the long term? Why do subalterns accept their positions, or what, at least, keeps them from open rebellion? How might we understand systems of power and inequality that are not based upon traditional hierarchical models? Readings include a selection of classic and contemporary readings drawn from cultural anthropology, archaeology, sociology, and biological anthropology.

ANTH G6046 Ethnography of the Nation-State. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar explores several related issues. First, we consider the ways in which “the nation” might have shaped academic social science and anthropology, in particular in the realms of social theory and concepts of culture.  Second we consider some of the ways anthropologists have thought about nation-states as objects of inquiry. Our main focus will be on ways in which anthropologists have attempted to do and write ethnography at the level of the nation, rather than the village or community. Most of the course will be devoted to a close examination of ethnographies that purport to be or can be thought of as about particular nations. These ethnographies, only a few among many that could have been included, have traced the relationship between cultural identities and national (and even transnational) processes; considered forms of national cultural production from mass media to political ideology; sought to examine nations through particular institutions; and attended to the workings of the social imagination using notions of memory, consciousness, and narrative. In the final part of the course, students examine for themselves and analyze the body of ethnographic work done on/in a particular nation.

ANTH G6047 Debating Nature. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What do we mean when we talk about nature? How does knowledge about nature get classified, stabilized, and made authoritative? How is nature managed? What happens when such management fails? In this course, we will rely on literature in environmental history, science and technology studies, and anthropology, as well as novels, poetry, nature writing and films to produce theoretically rich and ethnographically grounded understandings of this concept.

ANTH G6049 Arts of Magic, Scenes of Possession. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15-20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course begins by exploring domains where magic and possession are classically articulated: animistic beliefs, theories of magic, ritual practices, scenes of spirit mediumship, states of trance, and so on. The course then moves to bring into creative conversation these ethnographic texts on magic and possession with accounts of performance (theatrical, musical, dance), works of art (visual, cinematographic, sonic), acts of writing (literary, ethnographic, autobiographical), and, most fundamentally, reflections on the everyday. Pursued are issues of subjectivity--particularly, the conjuring and displacement of self in the form of the first-person singular "I"--and the twin forces of repetition and coincidence. Retraced throughout the course are thus the shadows of a modern subject and its uncanny powers of imagination.

ANTH G6050 Detection and Inscription: Ethnographies of Crime. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The place of crime and criminality in anthropologies of modernity.  A consideration of  how logics of detection, forms of representation, and technologies of inscription are linked to modern everydayness and urban mystery in varying national-cultural ocations.   Narratives of detection (Edgar Allan Poe and Edogawa Rampo, most centrally), reportage on criminal events, film, and photography analyzed through a range of theoretical and ethnographically analytic companion readings.  Criteria: background in anthropology and social theory

ANTH G6052 Globalization and Transnational Processes. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course aims to critically interrogate the contemporary ideological currency of the category of "globalization," while nonetheless sustaining a central question concerned with a contemporary acceleration of the global mobility of capital and labor, as well as a proliferation of social processes that are constituted as transnational in scale and scope. The course begins from the multiplex proposition that one cannot adequately comprehend the "postcolonial" without reference to colonialism, that one cannot sufficiently approach the "transnational" without consideration of nationalism, and finally, that one cannot apprehend this configuration of "globalization" without situating it in relation to other, prior configurations of globalization. In short, "globalization" must be located in some working relation to imperialism, as well as the enduring albeit reconfigured salience of national states. All of these antecedents, of course, have provided, in some definitive sense, the horizons of the discipline of Anthropology as we have inherited it. They will supply an indispensable framework through which to conceive of the possibility of anthropological critique in the wake of the accelerated processes of globalization that we must confront and struggle to comprehend in the present

ANTH G6054 Ethnography, Epistemology and Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines the classical critique of the categories and overall problematic of political economy.  What precisely constitutes the political in political economy?  Examines some questions of political theory as posited from Marxist and feminist standpoints.  Seeks to situate the methodological protocols and representational techniques of socio-cultural anthropology in terms of their own conditions of possibility within unequal relations of wealth and power in the modern world system

ANTH G6056 Revealing Identities: Heritage, Politics and Ethics In Archaeology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The development of a politicized archaeology which now recognizes its active role in contemporary culture, and is enunciated through the discourses of nationalism, sociopolitics, postcolonialism, diaspora and globalism. Examples from the Caribbean, Africa, Europe, Latin America, Australia, India and the Middle East

ANTH G6057 Governmentality, Citizenship and Indigenous Political Critique. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15. This course is open to upper level ugrads and graduate students with a background in anthropological and political theory.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: instructor's permission required.

This seminar explores the ways in which Indigenous peoples have theorized, deployed, critiqued notions of 'nationhood', 'citizenship' and 'sovereignty' in order to articulate and claim rights to territory, to jurisdiction and to the past. Our aim is to interrogate what these critical concepts mean in the literature of anthropology, political theory and Native American Studies as well as to examine the ways in which Indigenous peoples understand and critique state practices, maintain and construct their own modes of governance and mobilize politically to achieve their ends. This course is comparative in scope; literature and cases will be drawn from various sites but will dwell largely within Native North America.

ANTH G6058 Culture, Politics, Ethics. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20. Course open to PhD students only.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Through a reading of texts in anthropology, political theory, and philosophy, this course aims to explore the place of culture in adjudicating ethical claims about the good and political claims about community.

ANTH G6059 Dependency as a Cultural System. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

  In the 1960s and 70s, Latin American intellectuals - many of them writing in exile - developed a theory of imperialism that they called "Dependency Theory." The condition of "dependency" was thought to be a particular modality of capitalist development, rather than a lack of development. This theory of dependency was, therefore, written against development theories, a fact that distinguishes it both from early theories of imperialism (Lenin, Luxembourg) and from more recent theories (Hardt and Negri, Retort, Naomi Klein). Dependent countries were thought to be providers of resources and of perennial clients for imperial powers. Analysis of dependency was later rejected, reformed and transformed, both in "World Systems Theory" and, more subtly and with greater ramifications, in Subaltern Studies. Dependency theory is also an indirect object of critique in Achille Mbembe's more Hegelian approach to the post-colony. At the same time, dependency theory was also criticized by political economists who were critical of theories of "unequal exchange," including institutionalist economic historians, who questioned the economic fundamentals invoked in dependency theorists, characterization of the "dependent condition," often with substantial empirical support. This seminar has two aims: first, to inspect theories of imperialism from their inception to the present, and to place dependency theory within that broad interpretative tradition; and, second, to rethink "dependency" as an historical condition, by specifying and differentiating between various post-colonial conditions. The seminar seeks to interrogate the relationship between "dependency" and other approaches to the post-colony.

ANTH G6060 Archaeology of Empires: Graduate Seminar. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: some background in empires or archaeology.

Examines the formation, character, and fall of ancient empires through an archaeological lens. Among the topics compared are militarism, urbanism, representations of power and state ideology, provincial life, infrastructure, social and ethnic relations and economic interactions. Draws from both Old World and New World empires.

ANTH G6062 Savages In Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Seminar examines how various constructions of alterity play a constitutive role in a variety of foundational works of European social theory, prior to the institutionalization of the discipline of Anthropology as the preeminent intellectual project devoted to a study of the Other. Maps a genealogy of philosophical inquiries and debates that prefigure the emergence of anthropology as a discipline

ANTH G6064 Empire: Imagining the New World. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6068 Technologies of the Body. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Designed to explore the cultural constructions surrounding the idea of the flesh and the body. How do we, as cultural subjects, perceive the body and what meanings do we assign to it?  How do we decode these meanings by and through everyday and ritual practices (ritual and non-ritual tattoo, body modifications, religious formulations)?  How are gender/power/knowledge inscribed on the body and how do we index them through the experience of the flesh (circumcision and kleitoridectomies, homoeroticism, drug addiction, torture)?

ANTH G6069 TechnoBody. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

This course examines technological body interventions as framed by sociality and subjectivity. Of special interest are pre- and post-human contexts that generate technological nostalgia, desire, anxiety, or fear. Topics include transformative surgeries; cyborgs and other hybrids; the militarized body and the nation; and body economies.

ANTH G6072 Death and the Automobile. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Weapon of mass destruction, the automobile has yet to receive the anthropological attention for shaping the 20th century . What is the relation of the car to the poetics of place and speed? Why is Car-Talk the favorite NPR program? And cars the leading cause of death

ANTH G6074 Culture and Consumption. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Over the past five centuries the ideology and practice of the consumption of things and goods as both a source of well being and as the central organizing metaphor for social life has begun to expand to every place on the planet. This culture of consumption is rife with intrinsic contradictions. This course will explore these contradictions. This course will also ask about the kinds of social relations of exchange that existed before this change and how they have been worked and reworked by capitalist transitions. We will address these issues theoretically and methodologically. Our questions will include: What are the theories of consumption and exchange that will allow us to understand modern consumptive practices? How do things become commodities? What is the social history of the production of "the consumer"? How does consumption make bodies? How is social identity configured through the lenses of commodities and consumption? In what ways do nation states promote consumption? In what ways does consumption promote nation states? How do global businesses make consumers? What does social activism against consumption look like? How is the use of nature in places far from reaches of global capital different than other places? How and why have the social relations of production associated with capitalism become taken-for-granted and seen as natural?

ANTH G6076 The Enigma of the Social. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How does one account for mysterious sway of the social?  Reconsiders a series of now-classic, theoretically engaged texts concerned with social forces, powers of signification, and the strangely ineluctable emergence of a modern subject. Works by Saussure, Durkheim, Mauss, Marx, Weber, Freud, Boas, Canetti, Benjamin, Levi-Strauss, Foucault, Benveniste, and Derrida

ANTH G6080 Global History of Archaeology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focus on the archaeology and anthropology of societies that have written records, many of which emerge within a framework of the development of capitalism. The availability of documents as well as a material record facilitate interpretations of subjects such as urban life, landscape, enslavement, and colonialism.

ANTH G6082 Reading the Global City. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 10.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course looks at the global city as a "practiced place": inhabited, represented, translated and traveled. We shall consider how the city--broadly conceived--has been invested with meaning, and how particular cities conjure forth encounters with history. In contemplating the relationships that emerge from urban geographies, between world views, between and across "cultures," and between the text and the subject, we necessarily enter into discussions of the possibilities for community.

ANTH G6084 Science and Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines debates in the history and sociology of science and their significance for an anthropology of science. It engages methodological questions and theoretical debates concerning the significance of social interests, material agency, laboratory and social practices, and "culture(s)" in the making of scientific knowledge and in shaping social and cultural others.

ANTH G6085 Thing Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An intensified concern with thingness and materiality has emerged in the past decade as an explicitly interdisciplinary endeavor involving anthropologists, archaeologists, art historians, literary critics, and philosophers among others. The new material culture studies that has resulted inverts the longstanding study of how people make things by asking also how things make people, how objects mediate social relationships--ultimately how inanimate objects can be read as having a form of agency of their own. Readings will be drawn from foundational texts in this recent work by Daniel Miller, Alfred Gell, Bill Brown, Nicholas Thomas, and others that have situated their work at the boundaries between such things as object and subject, gift and commodity, art and artifact, the alienability and inalienability of things, as well as--at a disciplinary level--the distinction between ethnography, archaeology, and art history.

ANTH G6091 Carcerality. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will explore the theme of carcerality – through prisons, internment camps, slave plantations, native reservations, schools, and other predicaments of confinement and control – with three interrelated goals in mind. First and most importantly, we will use the lens of carcerality to revisit major questions in social theory around capital, race, gender, and sovereignty, through a variety of ethnographic, historical, legal, and literary texts. Particular attention will be paid to analytically connecting and contrasting carceral complexes in imperial, post-colonial, and settler-colonial contexts. Second, we will examine intellectual production under conditions of confinement by reference to “prison intellectuals” such as Antonio Gramsci, George Jackson, Fernand Braudel, Maurice Halbwachs, and Muhammad Asad. Third, we will explore the particular methodological and theoretical challenges that carcerality poses for ethnography. In the final weeks of the course, we will revisit the “classic” texts of carcerality most often relied upon by anthropologists, namely the writings of Michel Foucault and Giorgio Agamben.

ANTH G6092 Gender and Postcolonial Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Traces the relationship between feminism, colonial histories, and their postcolonial presents in the Middle East and South Asia.  Convergences between gendered identities, religious formations during the late 19th and 20th centuries, feminisms in the Middle East and South Asia today.  Ethnographic and historical approach.  Orientalism translation; pedagogy, widowhood; violence and memory; honor and the state; nationalism and citizenship; secularism and law; Islamic feminism; women's labor, and pleasure

ANTH G6094 Anthropologies of Radicalism: Marx and Others. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The Marxian legacy in translation, as it moved out of Europe and into East and especially Southeast Asia. Traces the questions of colonialism, imperialism and nationalism as they were formulated from within radical discourse at various moments in the 20th century.  Marx, Engels, Ho Chi Minh, Mao, Senghor, Adorno, Horkheimer, Derrida, Spivak, and Kasian

ANTH G6098 Society and Self In Archaeological Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The relationship between theories of society and self and their application to the archaeological record from a variety of contexts: prehistoric Europe, Bronze Age Mediterranean, pharaonic Egypt and the Classical world. Theory gleaned from anthropology, sociology and the social sciences

ANTH G6099 Object Lessons. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar examines human-object relations in the processes of world making. We revisit the classic works of Marx, Hegel, and Mauss to the classic Pacific ethnographies of exchange, circulation, alienability and fetishism, to the newly constituted material culture studies. We focus upon the broader interpretive connotations around and beyond the object, on the unstable terrain of interrelationships between sociality and materiality and the neglected area of the cultural constitution of objects. Objectification and materiality are examined through the inter-disciplinary lens of ethnography, archaeology, material culture studies and cultural studies.



ANTH G6100 Semiotic Anthropology I. 3 points.

Semiotic is the study of the activity of signs. What is the relationship between reality and representation? In what different ways can this relationship be theorized? What are the consequences of holding that reality, including the reality of culture, is a system of representations or of signs? These questions will be explored with reference to several recent anthropological texts as well as the writings of some key "non-anthropological" thinkers drawn from the following list: C.S. Peirce, Ferdinand de Saussure, Mikhail Bakhtin, Roland Barthes, A.J. Greimas, Michel Foucault,Jacques Derrida, Umberto Eco, and Julia Kristeva.

ANTH G6101 Archaeology and Social Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Designed to trace the major theoretical developments in archaeology over the past few decades from a global perspective. The relevance of the numerous strands of social theory that are commonly applied to archaeological materials. Influences from anthropological theory, feminist theory, philosophy, globalism, postmodernism, and poststructuralism.

ANTH G6102 Semiotic Anthropology II: Theorizations of Violence from Hobbes to The Present. 3 points.

This course is a survey of explicit and implicit theorizations of violence in a range of contexts: God and man, sovereign and subject, war and peace, master and slave, European and native, gender and sex, language and culture, state and citizen, colonizer and subject, universal reason and particular unreason, action and forgiveness. Throughout and parallelling these violent contexts run the threads of evils. Evils opposites are not presupposed, but analyzed in each of their defining encounters with "evils" in specified relational contexts wherein we will pursue the question of violence, its ontology and epistemology. This we shall do by reading, beginning in the 4th week, portions from a provocative and diligent book, alongside the other assigned readings. The book is Adi Ophar's The Order of Evils: Toward an Ontology of Morals, published by Zone Books. The other readings will be drawn from ethnography, philosophy, poetry, novels, sacred texts and social theory. The overall leading question in the course, however, is: What is it to be human and what is the place of violence in human being?

ANTH G6105 Seminar in Law and Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the conjuncture between the materialities of the archive and theories of evidence across a set of disciplinary practices. The course begins with readings that examine the problem of memory and its material capture and consider questions of truth and authority, disciplinarity and evidence. Authors include, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Reinhart Kosselleck, Lawrence Lessig, Ann Stoler, Ranajit Guha and Rolph Trouillot. The class then turns to examine these problems as they are played out in specific disciplines and social domains including the new genetics, digitalization, cultural heritage, and subalternity.

ANTH G6111 Anthropological Imagination In William Burroughs and Elias Canetti. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Designed to bring some freshness of insight and even naivete back into the study and writing of history and society by engaging with the exceedingly curious anthropological eye of two fiction writers famous for their obsessions with the spirits of the dead, animal-human transformation, paranoia, power, sex, secrecy, magic, and the state. Works of Burroughs and Canetti and early ethnography

ANTH G6113 Sacrilege and Defacement. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

What does defacement tell us about the role of the face in cultural production and the ethics therein, and why is sacrilege, as a form of defacement, a dominant source of the sacred, let alone of critique, in modernity?  Readings include Bataille, Nietzsche, Levinas, ethnography of unmaking and physiognomics.

ANTH G6115 Nation: Before and Beyond. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will look at the historical particularities of the nation-state in early modern  Europe and ask how far these have framed the nation-form in the rest of the world. The  course will also examine recent arguments about the end of the nation-state and the rise of postnational political formations

ANTH G6118 Anthropology in Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ANTH G6601, or the instructor's permission.

This course is intended for advanced students in socio-cultural anthropology, and is addressed to the question of interdisciplinarity as it relates to anthropology.   How does anthropology -- its discourses, concepts, methods, and theoretical interventions – travel outside of the discipline?  What do other disciplines and interdisciplinary formations, such as history, literary criticism, philosophy and cultural studies, ask of anthropology, and how do their practitioners deploy the questions and the knowledges generated within anthropology for their own purposes?  How does the auto-critical project that has been internal to the discipline function beyond its boundaries?  To what ends and purposes is anthropology asked to produce knowledge of the other-as-object? And how does this demand inflect the conceptual project carried out within the discipline?  These questions animate this course.  At a time in which ‘area studies’ have been reformulated to answer to the real-historical conditions of re-regionalization, and against the backdrop of several decades of institutional and intellectual reform under the name of ‘interdisciplinarity,’ this course provides students with an opportunity to reflect critically and specifically on the itineraries of their discipline and its place in a changed and changing milieu.  It will help them to deepen their own understanding of their discipline, but also prepare them for engagement with other disciplinary traditions. Our discussions will focus on: the idea of the anthropological type, the question of kinship, the concept of the gift and the method of ethnography.

ANTH G6119 Language and Power. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

On the relationship between language and technopolitical devices of cultural hegemony.  The political economy of talk; the sharpening and broadening of a sociopolitical notion of context; symmetrical discourse in public spheres; the politics of multivocality; and the troubling linkages of power/control/dominance/authority

ANTH G6120 Africa and the Politics of Culture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores how identity is experienced, imposed, imagined, and contested in Africa.  The deconstruction of ethnicity gender, class and nation provide a foundation; subsequent investigations will problematize the politics of culture, addressing conquest and civil war; schooling; labor and migration; ecological imperialism; and embodied religious expression

ANTH G6122 South African Intellectual History. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course is an introductory survey of the main political ideas, traditions and thinking that have defined South Africa's intellectual and political history. South Africa is currently defined as a post-colonial and a post-apartheid society and both terms suggest a historical moment or event that has been transcended or come to an end and yet the reality is that South Africa's political and intellectual past continues to define contemporary thought. The course's general approach is therefore both historical and thematic since the objective is to understand the historical context of South Africa's political traditions as well as their contemporary relevance. The reading material for the course will consist of both primary and secondary sources.

ANTH G6125 Language, Culture and Power. 3 points.

This course examines structuralist and pragmatic, post-structuralist and metapragmatic approaches to language and culture and their relevance and availability to the critical analysis of social power.

ANTH G6127 Migrancy and Subjectivity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6129 Economy, Society, and Value. 0 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is about economy and society, as seen through the lens of two classic works: Marx's Capital (volume 1) and Evans-Pritchard's Nuer (books 1 and 2). It has several overarching goals. First, to give students the opportunity to read, compare, and discuss two classic works in social theory-works that are often read in a piece-meal and rushed fashion, or presupposed as general canon. Second, to introduce students to key categories in British social anthropology, and Marxist and substantivist economics-and to provide a genealogy of these categories. To sketch an alternative metalanguage for examining social relations vis-a-vis the economy-one which is grounded in American Pragmatism and Boasian (Linguistic) Anthropology. And finally, in light of this genealogy and metalanguage, to reconsider a key set of disjunctures in the theoretical imaginary: householding to moneymaking, status to contract, community to society, quality to quantity, use-value to exchange-value, concrete domination to abstract domination, private to public, punishment to discipline, and so forth.

ANTH G6135 War and Society Theory. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

In this class, we will think about the various ways in which philosophers, social theorists, historians and anthropologists have thought about war. More specifically, the course focuses on a set of key themes and questions that have been central to such writings: the nature of violence and the question of responsibility or accountability, shifting technologies of warfare (including, technologies of representation), and the phenomenology and aftermath of warfare, for civilians and for combatants. The questions that drive this seminar are theoretical and historical, as well as ethical and political. For example, how do shifting understandings of the trauma of soldiers shape ethical questions and political conversations regarding "perpetration" and the question of responsibility? Or, when we think warfare through new technologies (cinematic, action at a distance) from whose perspective are we theorizing or trying to understand the "experience of" war? How might we analyze the very different affective responses that different forms of violence-or of "perpetration" -elicit?

ANTH G6145 Human Genetics and Variations. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6146 Human Evolution. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The fossil data bearing on human evolution, with a survey of other lines of evidence from archaeology, the neurological sciences, and evolutionary biology.

ANTH G6148 Primate Behavior. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Broad coverage of the fundamentals and recent developments in the field of primate behavior. An evolutionary perspective in the study of behavior is stressed, but is not limited to questions of evolutionary function. Constraints on evolutionary design inherent in the casual mechanisms underlying behavior (e.g. limits on cognition)

ANTH G6150 Anthropology & Taiwan. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course undertakes a dual examination of the cultural history of Taiwan through works of Anthropology and of the ways in which Anthropology has been mobilized in the contentious discourse about culture in Taiwan. It is the latter, the inquiry into the role of Anthropology in cultural and historiographic discourse in and about Taiwan, that will constitute the principal focus of the course. In both domains under examination, we will draw upon a range of texts. In our study of Taiwan's cultural history, we will avail ourselves of works addressing the archaeological record of settlement, and studies of various domains of cultural practice. In the examination of the Anthropology as a highly-charged mode of discursive practice, we will sample ethnographic works from key moments in the on-going discourse about the cultural history of Taiwan. We will begin with works by North Atlantic scholars in the Cold War era, when Anthropologists presented rural Taiwan as an instantiation of authentic Chinese culture of the late-imperial period, proceeding to the emergence of an Anthropology specifically of Taiwan, and, finally, turning our attention to the explosion of interest in ethnography in the Taiwan of the 1990s and early 2000s. In this current period, ethnography has assumed a central position in the construction of distinctive cultural identities for various groups in Taiwan and in the politically-charged debates about Taiwan's future. Ethnography also affords us a critical purchase upon the myriad forms of sociality in present-day Taiwan, which it is the principal objective of this course to explore, through a sampling of recent ethnographic works, in class discussions and through the independent works of students.

ANTH G6157 The Idea of a Radical Black Tradition. 3 points.

  This course will seek to raise and think through the following questions: What does it mean to talk today about a black radical tradition? What has it meant in the past to speak in these (or cognate) terms?  And if we take the debate in part at least to inhabit a normative discursive space, an argumentative space in which to make claims on the moral-political present, what ought it to mean to talk about a black radical tradition?

ANTH G6159 Race and the secular Self. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6161 Culture and Change In the Middle East. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Middle East with an emphasis on Arabs and Islam. Examination of the interaction of socio-cultural and political-economic variables in the construction of reality

ANTH G6165 Civil Wars, Citizenship and State Reform In Africa. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focus on five civil war situations in post-independence Africa as background: Sudan, Rwanda, the Banyarwanda Diaspora in the Great Lakes Region, Nigeria, and South Africa. Assessment of received notions of rights and citizenship, the form and crisis of the state and the experience of its reform. Focus on both the content and the subject of rights: not just which rights, but also whose rights

ANTH G6166 Religion in Chinese Society. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6167 Modern China. 3 points.

Formerly G4165Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Change and continuity in Chinese society during the 20th century, both before and after the establishment of the People's Republic.

ANTH G6169 Culture, Ecology and History in China. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the social ecology of the state in China, with particular emphasis on the cultural frameworks and behavior patterns of human interaction with the environment and its ecological consequences. It begins with an exploration of environmental histories of the imperial era, then turns to ecological and environmental issues relating to China's modern development.

ANTH G6178 Anthropology and Ethnography of Post-Socialism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey of anthropological and ethnographic approaches to post-socialism, including: (1) ethnographic approaches to institutional transformation, including Verdery, Humphries, Burawoy, Woodruff; (2)  postsocialist social modernity, including some of instructor's work, Lucan Way, Jowitt, Linda Cook; (3) post-Soviet man, including some more culturological work like Yurchak, Kharakhordin, possibly Boym

ANTH G6180 Topics In the Anthropology: Theories and Ethnographies of Japan. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Seminar analyzes modern Japan through contemporary work. Topics over the years: neonationalism, youth, culture, changing gender roles, aesthetics and politics, literature and history, urban space and architecture, Japanese philosophy, ethnographies of everyday life, and Japan in a globalized world

ANTH G6182 Urban African Cultures. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines the production of African urban space as built form and as social experiences. Conceptualizing urban space: the role of speed and technology in producing urban experience; built space of African cities; infrastructural networks that link Africans up into religious and economic networks in and out of Africa; the cultural styles through which the urban is performed and experienced; and the transformations in economy that shape African urban life.

ANTH G6184 Question In Identity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

          Designed to be both theoretical and empirical, clarifying concepts such as "identity" and "subjectivity" while also exploring various approaches to questions of political identification and self-understanding. We shall look at authors who approach questions of identity and subjectivity philosophically as well as historically. Some of the readings will be explicitly devoted to conceptual conundrums and theories of the self. Others will engage the question of political identification and analyze the practices of self-fashioning and subject formation as central social and political phenomena in particular contexts.

ANTH G6186 Performing Community and Subjectivity in Opera. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission by e-mail at mec3@columbia.edu.

Explores shifting visions of community and subjectivity that circulate in 1780s-1790s revolutionary moment in western Europe by interviewing readings from Enlightenment scholars and attention to three Mozart operas, public performances, that highlight very particular "Enlightenment" visions of persons and community.

ANTH G6190 Occult Modernity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The occult dimension of Western and Asian modernity from various anthropological, historical, literary and theoretical perspectives.  Topics include: spirit photography; the Japanese uncanny; parapsychology and technologies of wireless communication; occult otherness: Asia, theosophy, Buddhism; Poe and mesmerism

ANTH G6195 Anthropological Histories. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6200 Anthropology of History: the Nature of Historical Analysis, and Cultural Formations. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Emergence of modern forms of historical consciousness and writing, both in the history of philosophy and in various practical engagements with the problems of the past: Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Dilthey, Collingwood, Foucault, White, Kosselich, Derrida; modern historians, anthropologists, and others who attempt critical and reflexible forms of historical narration: E.P. Thompson, Joan Scott, Carlo Ginsberg, Natalie Davis, Marshall Sahlins, Ranajit Guha, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Greg Dening, Clifford Geertz, Bernard Cohn.  Also addresses the question of the archive: the nature of historical evidence and the institutional character of the state monuments that select and preserve the primary sources of historical analysis

ANTH G6205 Research Design in Anthropology. 3 points.

    Research design in anthropology (all subfields), from theoretical conceptualization to problem formation, methods, and grant writing.

ANTH G6207 Profane Illumination II. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

At the modern, urban crossroads of Jewish and Christian mysticism, Marxism, Surrealism, and love, stands Walter Benjamin's concept of profane illumination. This seminar explores the ramifications of the paradox entailed by such profanation, especially in relation to writing culture by means of the dialectical image as bodied impulse.

ANTH G6214 Anthropology and Journalism. 3 points.

Priority given to PhD students in Anthropology; open applications for doctoral students in related fields. Enrollment limited to 12.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The relationship between anthropology and journalism is perhaps fully as complex as the connection between anthropology and travel writing. Like most social and historical sciences, anthropology felt a certain compunction to distinguish what it did from "mere" journalism, for although both anthropology and journalism involve direct bodily engagement in "the field," journalists generally go to the field in order to accompany or follow an event that is meant to be "newsworthy," and therefore "timely" from the viewpoint of daily readers or listeners, whereas ethnographic field research emerged as a discipline during an era when anthropology was interested in durable structures. For this reason, anthropological fieldwork was organized around the observation of daily life in the course of at least one yearly cycle. Even ethnographic strategies that focused closely on events-Manchester School "Processualists," for instance, or "Symbolic Interactionists"-still presupposed ethnographic observation in the course of a longer cycle, even to single out a relevant event or process for intensive ethnographic focus.

ANTH G6220 Seminar On Class and Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Study of class in America, and what is happening to class today:  how the idea of class, and reality of class, is being transformed by the revolution of the rich and the challenge of multiculturalism since the 1970s

ANTH G6224 Bakhtin, Anthropology and Performance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6226 The Making of the African Diaspora. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to anthropological and historical scholarship on the African diaspora. We will explore, among other things, the development of diasporic identifications rooted in culture and politics; the role of capitalism and imperialism in the formation of the African diaspora; Pan-African and black internationalist political movements; the continual reinvention of Africa and the diaspora through cultural work and movements of people, ideas and capital

ANTH G6230 Media and Technology. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 16.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course examines how different theorists have examined the cultural logics of media technologies. It focuses on the relation between the materiality of technologies and the forms of social relations and political rule they encode and produce.

ANTH G6235 The Third World: After Sovereignty?. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

 It is increasingly being asserted today that the concept of sovereignty no longer constitutes a plausible way of organizing our thinking about power and legitimacy in contemporary global politics. The state, so it is sometimes said, as the pre-eminent source and adjudicator of political identity within territorially bounded nation-states a well as between sovereign states, is being fundamentally challenged. What does this mean for our understanding of the Third World which came into being precisely as part of the project of the universalization of sovereignty? What are the new conceptual and political conditions in which the problem of sovereignty arises in - and for- the Third World? Through a variety of literature this course engages these questions.

ANTH G6240 Parks and Politics: The Social Effects of Protected Areas. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Examines the social effects of parks and protected areas in order to understand both the politics of conservation and the politics of academic disciplines speaking for nature and culture.

ANTH G6242 The Imperial Present. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6245 Issues In Development: an Anthropological Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Reviews and evaluates issues of international development from an anthropological perspective. Case studies used to introduce critical issues in development, including the gap between local demands for social welfare and national principles of economic growth, the human costs of development and the rights of indigenous peoples, and the impact of urbanization, ethnicity, and the changing role of women

ANTH G6246 Documentary, anthropology realism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class will examine the relationship of film to time and to culture, and trace the ways that ideas of realism come out of that encounter. It explores the relation between film and the archive, the ontology of ethnography, and the social life of images. Andre Bazin famously wrote that "film embalms time" saving it from corruption and disappearance. But it can only do this by storing it on a medium that itself is on its own journey of corruption and degradation. This class will examine the relationship of film to time and to culture, and trace the ways that ideas of realism come out of that encounter. While privileging documentary, the class starts with the assumption that filming is an inherently ethnographic process in both content and form. The aim of the class is to examine the relationship of the film medium to realism, beginning with early cinema and ending with emerging digital media. It does so by considering the poetics of documentary, defined widely. Topics include, film and the archive, the ontology of ethnography, remediation, the social life of images, materiality of film, materiality of culture.

ANTH G6250 Women Writing Africa. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The intellectual and literary lives of women are often written about or thought of as separate from the intellectual lives of their male counterparts. Due to sexist exclusion and/or social, legal and political restrictions women's literary and intellectual production has often emerged and taken shape as a counterforce and vindication against these limitations. The course is an exploration of women as writers and thinkers. It especially looks at the work of those women who wrote from 'outside' the epicenters of Enlightenment civility: women on the road, women in bondage, women on the frontier and women in prison. It examines the myriad ways in which women have used literacy and writing as tools to carve out a place for themselves in the often masculine 'republic of letters'.

ANTH G6255 Film and Performativity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

In conversation with Walter Benjamin, a consideration of performance in relation and in opposition to the image. The impact of image technologies on performance: Is the modern concept of performativity itself a flight from the mechanically reproduced image?

ANTH G6271 Research Methods In Anthropology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Overview of research methods in anthropology with particular emphasis on field research methodology and its various aspects

ANTH G6285 Islam, Women and the State. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

  This graduate pro-seminar deals with issues in the politics of gender in Muslim societies. Taking an anthropological perspective, it will explore the relationship among women, religion and society, including its political institutions. More specifically, it stresses how actors deploy culture and religion to construct new realities in the political contexts of these societies. Focusing on gender as a system, we will examine how women confirm, contest and/or redefine their participation in society. Apart from the readings, we will occasionally view videos and discuss them in relation to substantive course content.  

ANTH G6290 Histories and Cultures of the Indian Diaspora. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A study of the Indian diaspora from the middle of the 19th century to the present, through various occasions of cultural formation. British, North American, African, and Caribbean experiences of migration; postcolonial formed around music, generation and politics; nationalist and/or postcolonial renderings of community. Interdisciplinary approach to these and other issues

ANTH G6300 Animal Alterity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6302 The Archaeology of Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Aims to provide students with an overview of the major forms of archaeological art and their geographic and chronological distribution. This course examines how archaeologists get information from art and provides students with an overview of the major forms of archaeological art and their geographic and chronological distribution. It aims to give students an understanding of the ability of art studies to document changes in human behaviour, technology, economy and ideology, and to help students become familiar with the major techniques used in the archaeological study of art. The social, ethical and political dimensions of practising archaeology are integral to this topic, as is an understanding of the close disciplinary links between the anthropological and archaeological study of art.  Case studies range from the 'meaning' of the Venus figurines of the Upper Palaelithic to the rock art of South Africa and the debates re-painting debates in Australia. Topic delivery is structured around active learning practices and includes a range of instructional strategies and tools in order to facilitate different styles of learning. The seminars are structured to develop student awareness of the limited and provisional nature of current knowledge in archaeology and to promote the development of communication, problem-solving and group-work skills. As well as gaining an overview of the major debates in the archaeological study of art, students will gain a better understanding of the ways in which archaeological data is used to support various theories

ANTH G6304 Modernity, Media, the Uncanny. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Modernity is often imagined as the culmination of the Enlightenment disenchantment of the world, a time in which increasing rationalization led to the decline of magic and the demise of spirits.  Yet students of the modern condition have been obsessed with disclosing and documenting precisely that which modernity claimed to extirpate, the ghostly by other names:  the unconscious, the fetishized, the irrational, the uncanny.  This seminar examines ghostly remainders of the modern through a variety of theoretical approaches  (ranging from anthropology to critical theory to psychoanalysis to deconstruction),  engagements with texts  (from poetry, short stories, and novels, to analytical works), and encounters with media objects (film, photography, video, audio recordings).   The course will be concerned to trace how ghosts appear and disappear,  both as figures of the Real and as figures for that which exceeds modern powers of objectification.

ANTH G6306 History of Modern South Asia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Surveys the major issues, debates, and literatures in the historiography of modern South Asia, from the late Mughal period to the present.  The history and effects of British colonial rule, around the formation of the state, the political economy of imperialism, the cultural forms of domination, the rise of nationalism, and the postcolonial legacies of the past.  The history of anthropological representations of South Asia, from Marx and Weber, through Risley and Ghyurye, to Dumont and Das

ANTH G6309 Ethnographies of South Asia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6310 The Ethnography of Sense. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: one year of graduate education or the instructor's permission.

The relationship between the two senses, the sense of phenomenal experience and the sense of the meaning in ethnographic representation and knowing. Insofar as representation is an act of remembrance, the course is also concerned with the relationship between sense and memory.

ANTH G6350 The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examination of a series of 16th- to 19th-century colonial encounters in North America, the Pacific, and Africa, based on archaeological data, ethnohistoric and oral accounts.  The variability among these encounters, and how contact situations change from inception to late stages.

ANTH G6353 Exhibiting Culture: Politics and Practices of Museum Exhibitions. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Examines anthropological, art, and history exhibits to explore how they visualize culture and identity. Relationships between museums, audiences, and the artists, cultures, and concepts exhibited will be explored.

ANTH G6400 Problem of Emancipation. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Taking as its point of departure the emancipation of slaves in the British Caribbean as a "triumph" of liberalism, this course examines some aspects of the relation between power, freedom, race, and modernity.

ANTH G6410 Between Land and Sea. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Focussing on the sun and the sea, this seminar is concerned with finding a language for tormented nature, including heat, rain, and the awakening of the bodily unconscious.

ANTH G6412 Major Debates In the Study of Africa. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6414 The Postcolonial Subject. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How do we understand the explosion of politics of identity in the postcolonial period?  Comparative study of postcolonial entitlement in India and Africa, race and ethnic-based mobilizations in Africa, and religion and caste-based movements in India. When do otherwise contradictory mobilizations - whether state-based or popular - tend to reproduce colonially crafted identities in the name of postcolonial justice? When does the pursuit of justice turn into revenge, and that of reconciliation into an embrace of evil? When do they lead to similar outcomes, reproducing political identities crafted under colonialism?

ANTH G6430 Recognition, Espionage, Camouflage. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the politics of recognition from the perspective of the security state. Not long ago, scholars and public intellectuals were ringing the death knell of the strong nation-state and celebrating the emergence of a new multicultural, postcolonial world. The sovereign right to kill was being replaced by the governmentalism of neoliberalism and a new kind of racism. The mobility of post-Fordist capital and the new media were thought to have created a qualitatively new mode of global cultural and social commerce fostering hybrid forms of social being and practice. Governmentality was not oriented to killing, but to constituting populations and their vitalities; to making live and letting die. Western states were busy performing shame and apologizing for past colonial practices. Suddenly things are not so clear—perhaps they never were. The post-9/11 world seems to have reorganized the logic and relations of recognition and civilization, the sovereign and neoliberal state. Pundits praised the “prescience” of Huntington’s Clash of Civilizations. Scholars rushed to embrace Agamben’s state of exception. Politicians in democracies sought to reclaim strong executive powers and the right to designate enemies, to kill, to suspend constitutional rights, and to rely on nondemocratic regimes to torture for truth. Civilization reemerged in an unapologetic form—a mode of differentiating the world in social and historical terms. Recognition was no longer merely about tolerance but about camouflage and espionage. This course seeks to understand whether and in what way the politics of recognition has mutated within the techniques of state security.

ANTH G6500 The Art of Fieldwork. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Fieldwork is what defines anthropology yet is rarely, if ever, discussed. Why? Why so invisible? Is it an art or a science or what, and what happens between f/w and the published text? What is the literary work of the f/w diary?

ANTH G6505 The Commodified body. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Sites of medical practice will dominate interrogations of embodied forms of commodification.  Key foci include exploitative labor practices; the marketing of the human body and its parts; and the mechanization of human bodies in contexts ranging from quotidian experiences, to cybernetic contexts, to futuristic visions involving cyborgs and other hybrid human forms.

ANTH G6565 Kafkaesque Anthropology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Reading all of Kafka's writings including diaries and commentaries by Benjamin and Delueze with aim of rethinking ethnographic writing especially in relation to law, the state, fathers, prehistory, animals, and the social conventions which allow absurdity, hypocrisy, and injustice appear as normal.

ANTH G6606 The Metaphysics of Antiterrorism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6616 Colonial Madness: Gold and Africa. 3 points.

Permission granted only after the first class.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course considers two histories of Africa and European colonialism on the continent.  The first is that of the fetish of gold, which both propelled the European frenzy of land acquisition and exploitation in West Africa and especially along the Guinea Coast and in South Africa, and generated a theoretical paradigm for understanding Africanity.  The second is the development of natural resource-extraction based economies, grounded in a libidinized fantasy of value that both repressed the fact of labor and legitimated its organization through displacement.  In undertaking an anthropological reading of these two historical trajectories, this course is broken into two main sections.  In the first half of the course, we engage the literature on fetishism that emerged at the nexus of comparative religion, philosophy and anthropology, as well as the historical literature on colonialism associated with precious metals (and the responses to that history in literature), focusing on the Guinea Coast.  In the second part, we undertake a reading of the transformation of the gold rush into the particular form of migrant labor that it assumed throughout the latter nineteenth and twentieth century, emphasizing the experience of southern Africa.

ANTH G6621 Rotten Sun. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

"The sun gives without receiving." With global warming, this pronouncement by Georges Bataille in The Accursed Share acquires an ironic twist. This seminar explores the philosophical and sensuous role of the sun: in Judge Schreber's Memoirs of My Mental Illness; in Delueze and Guattari, Anti Oedipus; in Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra; and in Bataille's essays on the sun in Documents and The Accursed Share, vol 1.

ANTH G6640 Seminar: Late 20th-Century Japan. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G6641 Social Organization. 3 points.

: Open to PhD and MA students in ANTH or by permission. Enrollment priorities: Graduate students in Anthropology and enrollment limit is 15.

‘Social organization' originally referred to the study of the various ways in which human groups organized, including kinship, religious organizations and social class or caste. Moreover, because anthropologists were concerned with comparing societies of many different sorts-- from small scale Australian aboriginal societies to archaic states in India, China or Peru-- the study of kinship, marriage, residence and territorial organization was of central importance

ANTH G6642 No Alternative: Modernity and Critical Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In recent years, theories of "alternative modernity" have arisen in anthropology and the other social sciences. Produced out of a concern with non-western difference and shaped by writings on globalization, such theories often betray a lack of sustained understanding of the aporias of modernity as theorized by critical theorists of the Frankfurt school and others. This seminar will work to critique the notion of alternative modernity by engaging critical theoretical works on "uneven development," the dilemmas of otherness, aesthetics and politics, and mass culture. It will do so in tandem with a consideration of what might be thought of as modernities elsewhere (with some emphasis on Japan as a key exemplar of so-called "nonwestern modernity").

ANTH G6650 Psychoanalytic Trajectories: Narrative and Ethnos. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course pairs classic works in psychoanalysis with narrative texts, both literary andethnographic. The class will consist of close readings of key psychoanalytic texts by Freud and Lacan, with secondary readings authored by Slavoj Zizek, Jeffrey Mehlman, Jacques Derrida, Samuel Weber, and others. Narrative works include Hoffman's "The Sandman" and Henry James's The Turn of the Screw and ethnographic writings by James Siegel and Claude Levi-Strauss.

ANTH G6651 ARCHAEOLOGIES OF THE CONTEMPORARY PAST. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar considers these questions through the writings of archaeologists (S. Dawdy, A. GonzSlez- Ruibal, P. Graves-Brown, R. Harrison, W. Rathje, J. Schofield) and others (Latour, connerton, Aug6, Yablon), through film ("Garbage Warrior", "lnto Eternity", "Life After People", "crash"). In the process, we will seek to develop a new body of thought on three core issues: (1) the distinctive temporalities of modernity, which appears to be compressing the present and making an archaeology of contemporary necessary, (2) the dystopian imaginaries that are in ascendance and that continue to re-script Western metanarratives, and (3) the strange methods we are led to adopt each time we examine the present as if it were already dead and gone.

ANTH G6666 Ethnography As Avant Garde Art Form. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A course aimed at combining artistic practice with anthropology

ANTH G6667 Marx and Neoliberalism. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

In this course we will first analyze Marx's account of capitalism in Capital and then turn to critical theoretical accounts of neoliberalism, concentrating on Foucault's account in The Birth of Biopolitics. Our work will have two foci: 1) what is and isn't distinctive about neoliberalism as a theory, description or modality of capitalism, 2) what is gained and lost in moving between Marx and Foucault. Thus we will reflect on epistemological and ontological matters in materialism, political rationality, and normative reason, and also on whether central concepts in Marx's critical theory-labor power, commodities, exchange value, fetishism, contradiction, etc.-remain relevant to neoliberal formations. This course is not an introduction to Marx or neoliberalism. It presumes knowledge of both, even as we will attempt to defamiliarize and rethink both. Note: To apply, send no more than a page on your relevant academic background and your interest in the course to wlbrown@berkeley.edu

ANTH G6668 Experience and Memory In Proust. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Intended mainly as a chance to read Proust in a group, this seminar dwells on his dazzling and unique contributions to the arts of memory in relation to language, the senses, and unacknowledged gay sexuality. With Proust we have to confront the apparent decay with modernity in our ability to experience the world, the postmodern sense of fractured selves, and the exquisitely modulated ethnography of class and caste hierarchies-all of which speaks to the world of cultural analysis as well as joyous writing.

ANTH G6669 The Media System of Empire. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 16.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class brings together media theory with anthropological and historical studies of colonialism in order to examine the media system of Empire. This refers to the modes of communication - documents, files, despatches - that constituted empire as a modern organizational system.

ANTH G8003 Research Design and Methods. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focus on preparing research proposals for dissertation-level research, from framing research questions and selecting appropriate methodologies to writing finished proposals

ANTH G8007 Gender, Sexuality and Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Gender and sexuality refer to theoretically distinct yet culturally entwined systems of meaningful (not natural) practices.  Emphasis on feminist theory and gay/lesbian studies.  Surveys contemporary theory regarding gender/sexuality; focus on a comparative and critical political economy of the body

ANTH G8009 Ethnographic Surrealism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Blurring fact and fiction, art and science, seminar aims at creating new forms of depicting the social world

ANTH G8010 Advanced Topics In Feminist Theory: Crimes of Intimacy. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

A genealogy of intimacy and its criminalization in the history of modernity, the dissemination of these related discourses and procedures in colonial contexts. The rise of the discourse of sexuality in European contexts; historical sources for an understanding of how modern institutionalized forms of homosociality (such as those found in the modern school and the professionalized military) came to be invested with the risk of homosexuality.

ANTH G8011 Gender, Feminism and Cultural Diversity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This research seminar will prepare students to conduct research and write a paper on the intersections of feminism, social movements, human rights, social-science research on gender, and studies of cultural diversity. Cultural diversity is termed as a human right in the Vienna Conference. In the Preamble to the 31st Session of the UNESCO General Conference in Paris, 2001, the concept of cultural diversity implies tolerance, dialogue and cooperation within a climate of trust, able in so doing to guarantee peace and international security. Human unity does not supersede cultural diversity.

ANTH G8019 Advanced Topics In American Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH G8344 Seminar On South American Archaeology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Critical examination of current problems and research in South American prehistory.  Problem areas vary from year to year.  (A reading knowledge of Spanish is recommended.)

ANTH G8376 The Ritual Process. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The role of rituals in the construction of history  and culture.  Emphasizes recent studies on ritual and colonial  assault and popular resistance.  Examples drawn from South African tribesmen, Madagascan peasants, Moroccan monarchy, Bolivian tin miners

ANTH G8498 Modern China. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Selected themes in the analysis of Chinese society during late imperial and modern times.

ANTH G8499 Seminar on Modern Taiwan. 3 points.

An interdisciplinary perspective on modern Taiwan’s culture, society and polity, including consideration of key historical developments. Each class meeting features a different lecturer with a particular scholarly interest in Taiwan, whose seminar presentation will be from his or her own disciplinary perspective. Lecturers are drawn from the fields of anthropology, economics, history, literature and political science.

ANTH G8534 Power, Opposition, and Aesthetics of Memory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Theoretical and ethnographic examination of interplay of centers of political domination and foci of opposition.  Multiple levels of this interplay, ways in which domination and opposition can intersect as well as diverge, and exploration of  multiple media through which the interaction can take place (rituals, songs, storytelling, television, architecture, newspapers, official government edicts, military confrontations).  Cases drawn from France, Morocco, and India

ANTH G8545 Anthropology of Affliction. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Contemporary medical anthropology focusing on such issues as embodiment, medical power and praxis, the commodification of the body and healing, social constructions of suffering, and the cultural significance of medical technologies.

ANTH G9113 Research In Quantitative Methods. 3-9 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Individual research and tutorial in quantitative methods for advanced graduate students.

ANTH G9114 Research In Data Processing. 3-9 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Individual research and tutorial in data processing for advanced graduate students.

ANTH GR4002 Controversial Topics in Human Evolution. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 10.

Prerequisites: an introductory biological/physical anthropology course and the instructor's permission.

Controversial issues that exist in current biological/physical anthropology, and controversies surrounding the descriptions and theories about particular fossil hominid discoveries, such as the earliest australopithecines, the diversity of Homo erectus, the extinction of the Neandertals, and the evolution of culture, language, and human cognition.

Spring 2017: ANTH GR4002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 4002 001/64209 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
467 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Ralph Holloway 3 6/12

ANTH GR6070 Making Ethnography: Method and Writing. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Enrollment limited to 20.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course offers a hands-on introduction to key methods of ethnographic fieldwork while exploring both practical and critical questions raised by the production of ethnographic knowledge. Students will become familiar with the diverse techniques collected under the heading of ‘ethnographic research' and will put these into action through a series of mini-research assignments. These assignments-and the successes, failures, surprises, disappointments and dilemmas students encounter in carrying them out-also provide the raw material through which we consider the epistemological and ethical possibilities and limits of ethnographic knowledge. Thus we take up ethnographic fieldwork and writing as situated practices with powerful histories, rather than as neutral methodological tools. Readings include examples of various kinds of ethnographic text (including images) and critical reflections on ethnography itself. Mini research assignments comprise a scaled-down dry run of ethnography making, giving students practice at preparing research proposals, conducting field observation and interviews, and turning these into contextualized ethnographic texts.

Fall 2017: ANTH GR6070
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 6070 001/17107 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
467 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Yasmin Cho 3 6/20

ANTH GR6352 Museum Anthropology: History and Theory. 3 points.

This course will consider museums as reflectors of social priorities which store important objects and display them in ways that present significant cultural messages. Students visit several New York museums to learn how a museum functions.

Fall 2017: ANTH GR6352
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 6352 001/16124 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
951 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Brian Boyd 3 0/18

ANTH GR6601 Questions in Anthropological Theory I: Texts. 3 points.

ONLY OPEN TO 1ST YR PHD STUDENTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY.

Presents students with critical theories of society, paying particular attention to classic continental social theory of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will trace a trajectory through important French and German writings essential for any understanding of the modern discipline of anthropology: from Saussure through Durkheim and Mauss, Marx, Weber, and on to the structuralist elaboration of these theoretical perspectives in Claude Lévi-Strauss, always bearing in mind the relationship of these theories to contemporary anthropology. We come last to Foucault and affiliated theorists as successors both to French structuralism and to German social theory and its concerns with modernity, rationality, and power. Throughout the readings, we will give special care to questions of signification as they inform anthropological inquiry, and we will be alert to the historical contexts that situate the discipline of anthropology today.

Fall 2017: ANTH GR6601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 6601 001/19415 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
467 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
David Scott 3 1/10

ANTH GR9101 Research In Social and Cultural Anthropology. 3-9 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Individual research and tutorial in social and cultural anthropology for advanced graduate students.

Spring 2017: ANTH GR9101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9101 001/16379  
Myron Cohen 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 002/70489  
Rune Reyhe 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 003/27661  
E. Valentine Daniel 3-9 1
ANTH 9101 004/16732  
Elizabeth Povinelli 3-9 5
ANTH 9101 005/71689  
Catherine Fennell 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 006/23271  
Marilyn Ivy 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 008/19851  
Michael Taussig 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 009/24017  
Brian Larkin 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 010/69855  
Ellen Marakowitz 3-9 4
ANTH 9101 011/71433  
3-9 0
ANTH 9101 012/11350  
Rosalind Morris 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 015/70642  
Severin Fowles 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 016/17192  
Karen Seeley 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 017/71919  
Audra Simpson 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 019/14803  
Lila Abu-Lughod 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 020/16993  
Paige West 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 021/12030  
David Scott 3-9 6
ANTH 9101 022/27948  
3-9 0
ANTH 9101 024/22501  
Steven Gregory 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 026/66693  
Lesley Sharp 3-9 1
ANTH 9101 030/69314  
Zoe Crossland 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 031/17798  
Claudio Lomnitz 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 032/73940  
3-9 0
ANTH 9101 033/15064  
3-9 0
ANTH 9101 034/22138  
Yasmin Cho 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 035/26653  
Naor Ben-Yehoyada 3-9 0
ANTH 9101 037/76544  
Vanessa Agard-Jones 3-9 0
Fall 2017: ANTH GR9101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9101 001/64785  
Myron Cohen 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 002/01526  
Nadia Abu El-Haj 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 003/70336  
Naor Ben-Yehoyada 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 004/19357  
Elizabeth Povinelli 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 005/77545  
Catherine Fennell 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 006/29336  
Marilyn Ivy 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 008/16018  
Michael Taussig 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 009/01142  
Brian Larkin 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 010/25750  
Ellen Marakowitz 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 012/17172  
Rosalind Morris 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 013/11248  
John Pemberton 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 016/75127  
Karen Seeley 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 019/75240  
Lila Abu-Lughod 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 021/73109  
David Scott 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 023/28978  
Partha Chatterjee 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 024/21635  
Steven Gregory 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 025/15969  
Brinkley Messick 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 027/27193  
Mahmood Mamdani 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 030/73380  
Zoe Crossland 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9101 031/24198  
Claudio Lomnitz 3-9 0/10

ANTH GR9102 Research In Archaeology. 3-9 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Individual research and tutorial in archaeology for advanced graduate students.

Spring 2017: ANTH GR9102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9102 001/68264  
Brian Boyd 3-9 3
ANTH 9102 002/64837  
Severin Fowles 3-9 0
ANTH 9102 003/72907  
Zoe Crossland 3-9 0
ANTH 9102 004/71648  
Terence D'Altroy 3-9 0
ANTH 9102 006/24164  
Nan Rothschild 3-9 0
ANTH 9102 007/86748  
David Harvey 3-9 0
ANTH 9102 008/91699  
Sergio Jarillo de la Torre 3-9 0
Fall 2017: ANTH GR9102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9102 001/04985  
Severin Fowles 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9102 003/60903  
Zoe Crossland 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9102 004/19140  
Terence D'Altroy 3-9 0/10

ANTH GR9103 Research In Physical Anthropology. 3-9 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Individual research and tutorial in physical anthropology for advanced graduate students.

Spring 2017: ANTH GR9103
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9103 001/18301  
Ralph Holloway 3-9 0
Fall 2017: ANTH GR9103
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9103 001/70941  
Ralph Holloway 3-9 0/10

ANTH GR9105 Research In Special Fields. 3-9 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Individual research in all divisions of anthropology and in allied fields for advanced graduate students

Spring 2017: ANTH GR9105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9105 001/75459  
Myron Cohen 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 002/60009  
Rune Reyhe 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 003/77192  
E. Valentine Daniel 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 004/15405  
Nadia Abu El-Haj 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 005/27777  
Catherine Fennell 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 006/27552  
Marilyn Ivy 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 008/25434  
Catherine Fennell 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 009/11759  
Brian Larkin 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 011/74836  
3-9 0
ANTH 9105 012/21141  
Rosalind Morris 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 015/68118  
Paige West 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 016/67222  
Karen Seeley 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 017/65492  
Audra Simpson 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 018/23185  
Michael Taussig 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 020/75567  
Lesley Sharp 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 021/74818  
Severin Fowles 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 022/66400  
David Scott 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 024/68705  
Partha Chatterjee 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 026/70315  
Brinkley Messick 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 028/28906  
Mahmood Mamdani 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 029/14083  
3-9 0
ANTH 9105 030/70913  
Zoe Crossland 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 031/16774  
Claudio Lomnitz 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 032/77598  
Rosalind Morris 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 033/21841  
3-9 0
ANTH 9105 035/12964  
Yasmin Cho 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 036/73693  
Naor Ben-Yehoyada 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 039/25358  
Vanessa Agard-Jones 3-9 0
ANTH 9105 041/70784  
3-9 1
Fall 2017: ANTH GR9105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9105 001/65298  
Myron Cohen 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 002/06649  
Nadia Abu El-Haj 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 003/62902  
Naor Ben-Yehoyada 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 006/74646  
Marilyn Ivy 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 009/03900  
Brian Larkin 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 010/76054  
Ellen Marakowitz 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 012/16180  
Rosalind Morris 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 013/19799  
John Pemberton 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 014/24402  
Elizabeth Povinelli 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 016/25120  
Karen Seeley 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 017/11851  
Audra Simpson 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 018/23430  
Michael Taussig 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 022/66938  
David Scott 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 023/16505  
Lila Abu-Lughod 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 024/19107  
Partha Chatterjee 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 026/10261  
Brinkley Messick 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 028/20765  
Mahmood Mamdani 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 029/27825  
3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 030/63032  
3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 031/21540  
Claudio Lomnitz 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9105 035/62359  
3-9 0/10

ANTH GR9110 Museum Anthropology Internship I. 3-9 points.

An internship arranged through the Museum Anthropology program of 10 hrs/week (for 3 credits) or 20 hrs/week (for 6). Involves "meaningful" work, requires keeping a journal and writing a paper at the completion of the semester. Not to be taken without permission of the program directors, usually after completing the Museum Anthropology core courses.

Spring 2017: ANTH GR9110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9110 001/67797  
Brian Boyd 3-9 8
Fall 2017: ANTH GR9110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9110 001/61494  
Brian Boyd 3-9 1/10

ANTH GR9111 Museum Anthropology Internship II. 3 points.

    An internship arranged through the Museum Anthropology program of 10 hrs/week (for 3 credits) or 20 hrs/week (for 6). Involves "meaningful" work, requires keeping a journal and writing a paper at the completion of the semester. Not to be taken without permission of the program directors, usually after completing the Museum Anthropology core courses.

Spring 2017: ANTH GR9111
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9111 001/97997  
Nan Rothschild 3 7/20
Fall 2017: ANTH GR9111
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9111 001/24711  
Brian Boyd 3 1/10

ANTH GR9112 Research In Archaeological Method and Theory. 3-9 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Individual research and tutorial in archaeological method and theory for advanced graduate students.

Spring 2017: ANTH GR9112
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9112 001/11251  
Brian Boyd 3-9 1
ANTH 9112 002/70918  
Severin Fowles 3-9 0
ANTH 9112 003/29709  
Zoe Crossland 3-9 0
ANTH 9112 005/69000  
3-9 0
ANTH 9112 006/26887  
3-9 0
Fall 2017: ANTH GR9112
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 9112 001/68703  
Brian Boyd 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9112 003/76634  
Zoe Crossland 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9112 004/21231  
Terence D'Altroy 3-9 0/10
ANTH 9112 005/07141  
Severin Fowles 3-9 0/10

ANTH UN1007 The Origins of Human Society. 3 points.

Mandatory recitation sections will be announced first week of classes.

An archaeological perspective on the evolution of human social life from the first bipedal step of our ape ancestors to the establishment of large sedentary villages. While traversing six million years and six continents, our explorations will lead us to consider such major issues as the development of human sexuality, the origin of language, the birth of “art” and religion, the domestication of plants and animals, and the foundations of social inequality. Designed for anyone who happens to be human.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN1007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 1007 001/03405 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Severin Fowles 3 77/120

ANTH UN3040 Anthropological Theory I. 4 points.

Open to majors; all others with instructor's permission.

Prerequisites: an introductory course in anthropology.

Institutions of social life. Kinship and locality in the structuring of society. Monographs dealing with both literate and nonliterate societies will be discussed in the context of anthropological fieldwork methods.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN3040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3040 001/09257 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Lesley Sharp 4 12/25

ANTH UN3933 Arabia Imagined. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course explores Arabia as a global phenomenon. It is organized around primary texts read in English translation. The site of the revelation of the Quran and the location of the sacred precincts of Islam, Arabia is the destination of pilgrimage and the direction of prayer for Muslims worldwide. It also is the locus of cultural expression ranging from the literature of the 1001 Nights to the broadcasts of Al Jazeera. We begin with themes of contemporary youth culture and political movements associated with the Arab Spring. Seminar paper.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN3933
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3933 001/75423 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
963 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Brinkley Messick 4 19/40

ANTH UN3939 The Anime Effect: Media and Technoculture in Contemporary Japan. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission

Culture, technology, and media in contemporary Japan. Theoretical and ethnographic engagements with forms of mass mediation, including anime, manga, video, and cell-phone novels. Considers larger global economic and political contexts, including post-Fukushima transformations.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN3939
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3939 001/64636 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
467 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Marilyn Ivy 4 10/20

ANTH UN3957 Ethnography of the Everyday. 4 points.

The ‘Ethnography of the Everyday’ offers students an opportunity to engage the discipline’s methods and genres, and the ethico-philosophical questions about representativeness and exemplarity that subtend them.The course will consider the everyday as an alternative concept to ‘culture’ and habitus,’ while looking at the ethnographic works that were informed by those ideas. Students will undertake weekly writing assignments as part of an investigation not only of method, but of aesthetics, expression, and representation in general.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN3957
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3957 001/22582 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
963 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Rosalind Morris 4 22/15

ANTH UN3989 Introduction to Urban Anthropology. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 18.

This seminar is an introduction to the theory and methods that have been developed by anthropologists to study contemporary cities and urban cultures. Although anthropology has historically focused on the study of non-Western and largely rural societies, since the 1960s, anthropologists have increasingly directed attention to cities and urban cultures. During the course of the semester, we will examine such topics as: the politics of urban planning, development and land use; race, class, gender and urban inequality; urban migration and transnational communities; the symbolic economies of urban space; and street life. Readings will include the works of Jane Jacobs, Sharon Zukin, and Henri Lefebvre.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN3989
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3989 001/26731 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
963 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Steven Gregory 4 20/20

ANTH UN3997 Supervised Individual Research Course In Anthropology. 2-6 points.

Prerequisite: the written permission of the staff member under whose supervision the research will be conducted.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3997 001/63867  
Brian Boyd 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 002/77182  
Myron Cohen 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 004/17247  
Zoe Crossland 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 005/73956  
Terence D'Altroy 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 006/08309  
Severin Fowles 2-6 1/10
ANTH 3997 008/76588  
Catherine Fennell 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 010/10663  
Marilyn Ivy 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 011/08101  
Nadia Abu El-Haj 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 014/75305  
Ellen Marakowitz 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 015/70506  
Naor Ben-Yehoyada 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 016/11482  
Rosalind Morris 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 017/24622  
John Pemberton 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 018/20503  
Elizabeth Povinelli 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 021/20740  
Partha Chatterjee 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 022/67065  
Karen Seeley 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 023/24015  
Audra Simpson 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 024/70041  
Michael Taussig 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 026/71176  
Lila Abu-Lughod 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 029/23513  
Ralph Holloway 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 031/76483  
Steven Gregory 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 032/13506  
Brinkley Messick 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 033/23153  
Mahmood Mamdani 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 034/12410  
David Scott 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 036/23458  
Claudio Lomnitz 2-6 0/10
ANTH 3997 044/20236  
Yasmin Cho 2-6 0/10

ANTH UN3998 Supervised Individual Research Course In Anthropology. 2-6 points.

Prerequisite: the written permission of the staff member under whose supervision the research will be conducted.

Spring 2017: ANTH UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3998 001/24588  
Brian Boyd 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 002/26627  
Myron Cohen 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 003/76844  
Rune Reyhe 2-6 1
ANTH 3998 004/25720  
Zoe Crossland 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 005/72468  
Terence D'Altroy 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 006/22673  
E. Valentine Daniel 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 008/73595  
Catherine Fennell 2-6 3
ANTH 3998 009/15902  
E. Valentine Daniel 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 010/69571  
Marilyn Ivy 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 011/18795  
Yasmin Cho 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 012/60153  
Naor Ben-Yehoyada 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 014/29194  
Ellen Marakowitz 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 015/27967  
2-6 0
ANTH 3998 016/62864  
Rosalind Morris 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 017/11893  
John Pemberton 2-6 1
ANTH 3998 018/25846  
Elizabeth Povinelli 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 021/22612  
Partha Chatterjee 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 022/62786  
Karen Seeley 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 024/71311  
Michael Taussig 2-6 1
ANTH 3998 026/76314  
Lila Abu-Lughod 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 029/13321  
Ralph Holloway 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 030/14835  
2-6 0
ANTH 3998 031/64732  
Steven Gregory 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 032/23319  
Brinkley Messick 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 033/23082  
Mahmood Mamdani 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 034/64242  
David Scott 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 036/60992  
Claudio Lomnitz 2-6 1
ANTH 3998 039/75210  
Sarah Muir 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 041/16490  
2-6 0
ANTH 3998 042/24276  
Marilyn Ivy 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 044/74740  
Vanessa Agard-Jones 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 045/73266  
2-6 0
ANTH 3998 046/72941  
Elizabeth Povinelli 2-6 0
ANTH 3998 052/15784  
Carole Vance 2-6 0

ANTH V1009 Introduction to Language and Culture. 3 points.

This is an introduction to the study of the production, interpretation, and reproduction of social meanings as expressed through language. In exploring language in relation to culture and society, it focuses on how communication informs and transforms the sociocultural environment.

ANTH V1130 Africa and the Anthropologist. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 80.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Susan Sontag famously wrote that, "Most serious thought in our time struggles with the feeling of homelessness". This course examines some of the classic texts that have been written about Africa as a place of "homelessness" or the place in which to search for "the self in others". The course is in two parts - the first part consists of theoretical readings on the history, uses, and abuses of anthropology as a discipline. The second part consists of texts written by African anthropologists. Rather than focus on concepts like kinship, marriage, the gift, etc., this course attempts to provide an intellectual history of the discipline and its relationship to Africa. The "kinship" links that are examined are, therefore, between ideas, authors, locales, and the particular space of southern Africa as a site of ethnographic and anthropological imaginings.

ANTH V2006 Corruption in Critical Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What is corruption? Is it - as we are prone to suspect - detrimental to social equality, political participation, and economic growth? Through readings on the anthropology of bureaucracy, politics, exchange, and witchcraft, this class will develop a critical perspective on corruption that both problematizes and takes these intuitive claims seriously. 

ANTH V2009 Culture through Film and Media. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine the intersections of film and anthropology. We will focus on the use of film within anthropology and turn the telescope around to propose a fragmentary anthropology of film. We will query histories and theories of film as they overlap with various understandings of anthropology, interrogating such historically problematic notions as "primitive" and "classic", and "document" and "narrative." We will examine ethnographic and documentary films as they echo and collide with films seemingly outside the limits of their domains, emphasizing close analysis and detailed comparisons of our objects both in film and in language.

ANTH V2013 Africa in the 21st Century: Aesthetics, Culture, Politics. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the relationship between indigenous and 21st century aesthetics; and social, economic and political relationships in Africa. Students will be encouraged to examine aesthetic traditions in terms of the individual and social aspirations they embody, commerce through the geographies of exchange that articulate with specific resources, and examine politics through the diverse modes of sociality that prevail in different regions. 

ANTH V2014 Archaeology and Africa: Changing Perceptions of the African Past. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the changing perspectives on African archaeology over the last two centuries. We will trace the history of archaeological fieldwork in Africa, looking at archaeology's relationship to colonialism and European narratives of world history. These will be compared with the ways in which archaeology has been drawn upon in the post-colonial period within nationalist, Afrocentric and postcolonial accounts. Using a variety of archaeological case studies, we will look at the key issues in African archaeology today and assess how these debates have been informed by the particular history of archaeological interpretation in Africa. Topics will include the archaeology of human origins and dispersal out of Africa, the development of farming and the use of metals, the archaeology of African kingdoms and state formation, the colonial encounter, and the archaeology of the African Diaspora. 

ANTH V2016 Gendered Migration in Transnational Asia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What makes women's migration experience different from men's in global capitalism today? The course will investigate contemporary women's transnational migration from developing countries to newly developed countries in Asia and beyond. We will discuss issues related to labor and marriage migrations, as well as trafficking in women, on both macro - and micro - levels. We are going to ask: how does the global economic restructuring shape the gendered migration today? What makes female labor different from male labor in the global labor market? What are push-and-pull factors that trigger these women to leave their hometown to be workers or wives in foreign countries? What difficulties do they experience after entering host societies and what impact would the migration flow bring to both laborer/bride receiving and sending countries? Moreover, we will explore the global market formation of transnational commodified marriages between women from developing countries and men from more developed countries. We will look at Filipina, Vietnamese, and Chinese women migrating to Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and the United States, in particular. Throughout the semester, we will read empirical works from many disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, political economy, and women's studies, as well as primary source materials, including news reports, online forums, documentaries, and film clips.

ANTH V2020 Chinese Strategies: Cultures in Practice. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine major elements of Chinese culture historically and in the present-day. We will begin with a study of Chinese society in the late-imperial period (1368-1843), addressing key features of economic organization, kinship systems, popular religion, and state administration. From this foundation, we will examine changes and (apparent) continuities in cultural practices over the course of China’s Nationalist, Maoist and post-Socialist revolutions, with particular attention to the present-day. Through the study of several recent ethnographies of conditions in rural and urban China, we will explore the ways in which the cultural conventions of the past have informed the strategies Chinese have devised in their negotiations with the global commercial economy and with an often predatory state.

ANTH V2028 Pasts, Presents and Futures: An Introduction to 21st Century Archaeology. 3 points.

$25 mandatory lab fee.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to archaeology. We start with a critical overview of the origins of the discipline in the 18th and 19th centuries, and then move on to consider key themes in current archaeological thinking. These include: ‘Time and the past: what is the difference’? What are archaeological sites and how do we ‘discover’ them? How is the relationship between the living and the dead negotiated through archaeological practice? What are the ethical issues? How do we create narratives from archaeological evidence? Who gets written in and out of these histories? Archaeology in film and media is also covered.

ANTH V2035 Introduction to the Anthropology of South Asia. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course provides a broad introduction to the anthropology of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. We will explore social and cultural formations such as caste, class, marriage, and the family; as well as the organization of cultural diversity by colonial rule, nationalism and modern statehood, ethnic and religious conflict, and transnational circulations. In addition to secondary sources, students will be particularly encouraged to engage with primary sources such as treatises, speeches, poetry, music, and film. Through learning about the ethnography of the South Asia region, students will also gain an understanding of contemporary theoretical debates in anthropology, which include: the legacies of colonial rule in postcolonial societies, the social power of analytical categories, and the impact of globalization. 

ANTH V2090 The Road. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

As literary, cinematic, and musical trope, the Road bears the weight of both transcendent American aspirations and banal evocations of national ethos. Engaging popular literature, film, and music, this course examines the figurative and literal Road as a medium that both reveals and constructs senses of American identity and place. 

ANTH V2100 Muslim Societies. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of religion and society not limited to the Middle East. A series of Muslim societies of various types and locations will be approached historically and contextually to understand their family resemblances and their differences, their distinctive mechanisms of coherence, and their patterns of contestation. 

ANTH V2102 Muslims in the West. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

ANTH V2139 Magic Witchcraft and Modernity. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 152.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class investigates magic and witchcraft, in addition to spirit mediums and ghosts in the shadow of technology, industry, and rational science. Beginning with the simple and open-ended definition of magic as a means to control and make sense of events that cannot be explained, the course is a journey through uncanny convergences and apparitional events that are at once sensual, yet ghostly. Course material ranges from baseball players who employ magical practices to deal with mathematical uncertainties of the game, to more challenging case studies on witchcraft, spirit possession, shamanism, and other forms of magic as healing. Alongside contemporary readings on the topic, students will also read classic anthropological texts on magic and witchcraft.

ANTH V2300 Anthropology of Estrangement. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

To examine anthropological explanation as a passage from the known to the unknown that problematizes the known, as well as leaving some kernel of the strange, the exotic, and the unfamiliar a mystery, and does not reduce everything to an explanation. How might we master the need for mastery? What happens after we have problematized the known? Readings: accounts of fieldwork, select ethnography, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Brecht, Benjamin, Bataille.

ANTH V2400 Culture and Finance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class will construct a dual perspective on the intersection between culture and finance. On the one hand, we will be concerned with finance as a culturally constituted social field; on the other, we will examine the far-reaching sociocultural consequences of financial practices. Students will write four short papers, each corresponding to one of the four thematic sections of the class - Money and Exchange; Debt, Credit, and Value; The Production and Productivity of Risk; and Cultures of Crisis. 

ANTH V3004 Introduction to Environmental Anthropology. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In the past thirty years, disciplines across the social sciences and humanities -- from philosophy to history to sociology to political science to geography to cultural studies -- have undergone a "greening" as the social aspects of nature have come to be seen as a legitimate, even sexy subject of scholarly investigation. In a very real sense, anthropology has always been environmental. Given nature's tremendous capacity to shape nearly every facet of our existence, both physiological and cultural, the self-proclaimed "science of humanity" could hardly be otherwise. This course provides a critical introduction to environmental anthropology, beginning with a brief exploration of its historical roots and examining its various iterations (including cultural, historical, and human ecology) but concentrating especially upon anthropology's contributions to the interdisciplinary field of political ecology, with a particular emphasis on issues of environmental justice. Although the readings for the course are discipline-specific, the course will attempt to contextualize the anthropological take on particular environmental topics within the broader cross-disciplinary framework noted above in lectures and class discussions.

ANTH V3005 Africa: Culture and Society. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Exploration of the social orders and cultural sensibilities that form contemporary Africa. Examining the rise of urban cultures, religious movements, informal economies, crime, and corruption, this class explores the structures of African life, the sensibilities they engender, and the forms of life they give rise to. 

ANTH V3007 Holy Lands, Unholy Histories: Archaeology before the Bible. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course provides a critical overview of prehistoric archaeology in the Near East (or the Levant - the geographical area from Lebanon in the north to the Sinai in the south, and from the middle Euphrates in Syria to southern Jordan). It has been designed to appeal to anthropologists, historians, and students interested in the Ancient Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Studies. The course is divided into two parts. First, a social and political history of prehistoric and "biblical" archaeology, emphasizing how the nature of current theoretical and practical knowledge has been shaped and defined by previous research traditions and, second, how the current political situation in the region impinges upon archaeological practice. Themes include: the dominance of "biblical archaeology" and the implications for Palestinian archaeology, Islamic archaeology, the impact of European contact from the Crusades onwards, and the development of prehistoric archaeology.

ANTH V3008 Maximum Cinemas: Indian and Nigerian Film Cultures. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Hindi cinema represents one of the oldest and most dynamic forms of popular cinema whose popularity has spread far beyond India itself into countries from Senegal to Korea. Nigerian cinema, or Nollywood, represents one of the newest. In little more than a decade, it has spread all over Africa and, increasingly, into the Caribbean and Black diaspora.

ANTH V3014 East Asian Societies and Cultures. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Introduction to the contemporary societies of China, Japan, and Korea, with special attention to social institutions and cultural patterns that shape hierarchy, egalitarianism, and inequality as reflected in family patterns, community life, religion, and economic behavior of social change.

ANTH V3015 Chinese Society. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Social organization and social change in China from late imperial times to the present. Major topics include family, kinship, community, stratification, and the relationships between the state and local society.

ANTH V3035 Religion in Chinese Society. 3 points.

Chinese popular religion and ritual during the late traditional period and in modern times. Popular beliefs and practices concerning the cosmos, the gods, and the ancestors; the role in popular religion of Buddhism, Taoism, and the Imperial State Cult; popular religion, social change, and the modern assault on "superstition.

ANTH V3043 The Anthropology of Religion and Society. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

ANTH V3044 Symbolic Anthropology. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Exploration of the manner in which various anthropologists have constructed “culture” as being constituted of a set of conventional signs called “symbols” and the consequences of such a construal. Among the authors read are the anthropologists Valentine Daniel, Mary Douglas, Clifford Geertz, Claude Levi-Strauss, Sherry Ortner, David Schneider, Margaret Trawick, and Victor Turner; the social theorists Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, and Max Weber; the semioticians Ferdinand de Saussure and Charles Peirce; and the psychoanalysts Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. 

ANTH V3055 Strategy of Archaeology. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3064 Death and the Body. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class explores the ways in which archaeologists use the dead body to explore past beliefs and social practices, critically assessing these approaches from the broader perspective of anthropological and sociological theories of the body’s production and constitution. We’ll look at the ways in which social status, gender, and personhood are expressed through the dead body and through practices of body modification and display. In this context, we’ll also consider the social relations of archaeological exhumation, the conflict that can arise over the excavation of human remains, and their treatment as courtroom evidence in forensic archaeology.

ANTH V3106 Post-Socialist China: State, Society, and Globalization. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Since 1989, socialism across Eurasia has experienced profound transformations. Different from the dramatic transition to "capitalism" and "democracy" in the former Soviet bloc, China (and to a large degree, Viet Nam as well) has adroitly combined an authoritarian state, with a highly capitalist economy, with socialism, becoming a nominal rhetoric at large. This course unpacks postsocialist China by interrogating the ways in which China's recent economic success has been accompanied by mounting social and cultural tensions at the heart of Chinese society. In this course, we will explore the complexity and diversity of contemporary Chinese society and culture as well as its ongoing postsocialist transformations. Main topics will include: Chinese kinship and networking/"guanxi"; ethnicity and nationalism; post-socialist rural transformations; the "floating population" of migrant laborers; changing urban spaces; consumerism and the emerging urban middle-class; and transnationalism. Controversies surrounding issues such as HIV/AIDS, sexuality, and birth control policy that have drawn much international attention will be discussed in local contexts. In reading a variety of compelling writings by current authors, we will explore not only what has been written about China, but also how Chinese culture has been written by scholars. 

ANTH V3120 Historical Rituals in Latin America. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 60.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: undergraduate majors.

Anthropologists and historians of literacy and communication have emphasized the reliance on multivocal imagery in the organization of social and political life in Latin America. Historically, the salient role of image and of ritual in political ritual was fed by the chasm between literate and illiterate segments of the population. During the twentieth century, however, the rise of mass politics on one hand, and television and other visual media on the other, gave a new lease on the vibrant relevance of historical ritual and myth in local polticial life. This course explores the role of religious and secular ritual and myth in framing historical processes. It makes special emphasis on the use of Catholic ritual, imagery, and mythology in the European conquest and colonization of the continent; and in revolution, nationbuilding, civic life, and sexual politics, since the 19th century.

ANTH V3126 Imagining the City. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the various ways in which cities are planned, represented, and navigated; and interrogates collectively imagined forms of social life and social order as they are reflected in urban design. By pairing fiction films and documentaries with readings from anthropology, sociology, history, and literary criticism, we will discuss the role of planning, speculation, technology, and nostalgia in defining and conceptualizing the city.

ANTH V3160 The Body and Society. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 40; not open to first-years.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Non-anthropology majors require the instructor's permission.

Introduction to medical anthropology, exploring health, affliction, and healing cross-culturally. Draws from theory and methods to address critiques of biomedical, epidemiological, and other models of disease; the roles of healers in different societies; the inseparable nature of religion and healing; and different conceptions of the body and how this affects cultural conceptions of health. 

ANTH V3465 Women and Gender Politics in the Muslim World. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Practices like veiling that are central to Western images of women and Islam are also contested issues throughout the Muslim world. Examines debates about Islam and gender and explores the interplay of cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping women's lives in the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia.

ANTH V3525 Introduction to South Asian History and Culture. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines four major aspects of contemporary South Asian societies: nationalism, religious reform, gender, and caste. Provides a critical survey of the history of and continuing debates over these critical themes of society, politics, and culture in South Asia. Readings consist of primary texts that were part of the original debates and secondary sources that represent the current scholarly assessment on these subjects. 

ANTH V3660 Gender, Culture, and Human Rights. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

     

ANTH V3700 Colloquium: Anthropological Research Problems in Complex Societies. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3711 States of Confinement. 4 points.

Enrolment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Recent years have seen an upsurge of interest among scholars from across the humanities and humanistic social sciences in the forms, precipitants, and effects of mass incarceration (and ‘the penal state' more generally), especially in the contemporary United States. This course seeks both to engage this growing literature and, at the same time, to broaden its historical, cultural, conceptual, and phenomenological scope through an examination of confinement as it has been conceived of - and imposed - across a wide range of societal and geographical contexts: prisons, internment camps, asylums, slave plantations, native reservations, religious monasteries, and more. What are the links between the regulation of movement and various political, legal, and economic regimes? Between punishment-by-imprisonment and particular forms of sovereign power - in imperial, post-colonial, and settler-colonial societies alike? Why, and in what ways, have certain populations been targeted for confinement in specific times and places? How might we understand the interplay between the partitioning of human bodies in enclosed spaces, on the one hand, and practices of social control, exclusion, and stratification on the other? Drawing on ethnographic accounts, historical case studies, and influential theoretical texts (Durkheim, Bentham, Elias, Fanon, Goffman, Foucault, Agamben), this course ultimately asks how a cross-cultural, historical approach to confinement might allow us to shed light on, and so provincialize, what sociologist Loïc Wacquant has called the hyperincarceration of whole segments of the American populace today.

ANTH V3714 Zooarchaeology Method and Theory. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores zooarchaeology as a subdiscipline, highlighting the potential of archaeofaunal remains to provide insight into social, political, ritual, and economic organization and the history of human interaction with the environment. The course is designed primarily for students in the archaeology major or concentrations, but is open to other undergraduate and graduate students, with instructor's permission. Students are not expected to have prior experience in the lab. Students will gain basic knowledge of the methods and underlying theory of zooarchaeological analysis as well as the ability to assess the strengths and weaknesses of zooarchaeological data in addressing archaeological research questions in Old and New World archaeology.

ANTH V3717 Laboratory Lives: Scientific Space, Selves, and Subjects. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15. Upper-level undergraduates have priority.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Scientific laboratories have become important sites for making knowledge about the world, and as such, for remaking the world. But what are scientific laboratories? This course examines the laboratory anthropologically through key ethnographic, historical, and theoretical readings that explore the distinct spaces, selves, and subjects that make up “laboratory life".

ANTH V3721 Spatial Analysis in Archaeology. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This is an advanced course in spatial modeling developed specifically for Anthropology students, particularly those pursuing a degree through the inter-departmental Archaeology program. This course will provide a foundation for understanding a variety of issues related to spatial analysis and modeling. Students will explore the concepts, tools, and techniques of GIS modeling and review and critique its application within archaeology. The course will also offer students the opportunity to design, build and evaluate their own spatial analyses. We will draw from a wide range of examples, including trade and exchange networks in Greece, placement of shrines and homes in the pre-Hispanic American Southwest, and the imposition of power within sacred spaces at Angkor Wat in Cambodia. The course will consist of lectures, reading assignments, lab assignments, and a final project. Priority given to senior and juniors.

ANTH V3761 Ethnographic Research: Methods and Concepts. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor's permission required.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces undergraduate students in anthropology, sociology, and related fields to ethnographic fieldwork. It is designed as a seminar/practicum, and we will divide our class time between the analysis of texts and the analysis of our own attempts to carry out the ethnographic methods described in those texts. Students will formulate an ethnographic question, which they will systematically investigate through weekly field assignments and a final research proposal. Throughout, we will attend not only to the application of particular methods to particular questions, but also to the broader epistemological and ethical questions that inform ethnographic fieldwork.

ANTH V3762 Native Meaning. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course uses primary and secondary source materials to teach the histories, cultures, and philosophical systems of Indigenous peoples located within the United States and Canada. This course moves geographically through the East into the Circumpolar North, the Dakotas, and then into the Pacific Northwest; and then moves temporally through pre-settlement into settlement periods through materials that comprise an active archive of Indigenous communicative practices, philosophies, and politics. The course resists the earlier anthropological conceit of placing Indigenous peoples within a "before" state, as matter to be salvaged in an immanent disappearance of pure, cultural form and difference; as Indigenous people, in fact, have not disappeared, and possess deep histories that are alive within the present and in different cultural forms. As such, the course pairs cultural "artifacts," ethnography with contemporary expressive culture (autobiography, visual art) in order to create an intellectual genealogy and cultural history of Indigeneity, and Indigenous sovereignty that lives within the present.

ANTH V3806 Science and Society in the Middle East. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3807 The Next City: Speculation, Technology, Nostalgia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3810 Madagascar. 4 points.

Enrollment limit is 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Non-Anthropology majors require the instructor's permission.

Critiques the many ways the great Red Island has been described and imagined by explorers, colonists, social scientists, and historians—as an Asian-African amalgamation, an ecological paradise, and a microcosm of the Indian Ocean. Religious diasporas, mercantilism, colonization, enslavement, and race and nation define key categories of comparative analysis.

ANTH V3820 Theory and Method in Archaeology. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3821 Native America. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 40.

This is an undergraduate seminar that takes up primary and secondary sources and reflections to: a) provide students with an historical overview of Native American issues and representational practices, b) provide students with an understanding of the ways in which land expropriation and concomitant military and legal struggle have formed the core of Native-State relations and are themselves central to American and Native American history and culture, and c) provide students with an understanding of Native representational practices, political subjectivity, and aspiration.

ANTH V3822 Media, Aesthetics, Politics. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 25. Priority given to Anthropology majors, juniors, and seniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Politics revolves around what can be seen, felt, and sensed. Political acts are encoded in medial and aesthetic forms - bodies protesting in the street, punch holes on a card, images on a television newscast, tweets about events unfolding in real time  -by which the political becomes manifest in the world. How do these forms gain their force? What role do they play in shaping people as subjects and defining the terms of political possibility? How do they reinscribe particular relations of power as issues of political concern and concrete transformation? This course will explore these questions as part of our effort to trace the connections between media, aesthetics, and politics.

ANTH V3824 Fantasy, Film, and Fiction in Archaeology. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3826 Brain Science: A Social History. 4 points.

Permission of the instructor is requird. Enrollment limited to 20. Open to juniors and seniors only.

In light of the ascendance of neuroscience, this course explores the social history of brain science from the mid-19th century to the present. We will consider the contexts in which cerebral technologies, including psychoanalysis, psychosurgery, brainwashing, and psychotropic medications were created, as well as the doctors, psychologists, and military personnel who deployed them for various social and political ends. Throughout the course, we will investigate persisting interest in knowing the mind, enhancing mental functioning, and managing problem brains.

ANTH V3829 Absent Bodies. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: Open to undergrad majors; others with the instructor's permission.

Across a range of cultural and historic contexts, one encounters traces of bodies - and persons - rendered absent, invisible, or erased. Knowledge of the ghostly presence nevertheless prevails, revealing an inextricable relationship between presence and absence. This course addresses the theme of absent bodies in such contexts as war and other memorials, clinical practices, and industrialization, with interdisciplinary readings drawn from anthropology, war and labor histories, and dystopic science fiction.

ANTH V3831 Cultures and Ecomomies: Explorations in Economic Anthropology. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given to juniors and seniorsNot offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class explores the intersection of economy, culture, and society from a comparative, anthropological perspective. What have anthropologists learned about the different economic systems of the societies they study? How do economic practices and processes interact with the broader sociocultural worlds in which they are pursued and elaborated? What kind of concepts and methods do anthropologists draw on in their ethnographic (and archeological) researches into the diversity of human economic life? By reading classic and contemporary works in the field of economic anthropology, this class introduce students to longstanding discussions and debates about: economic rationality as a social form; the application of economic principles and methods to non-marketized societies; the nature of exchange and value; the sociocultural dimensions of monetarization and marketization; the role of gender and class in economic production; and the paradoxes of private property in everyday lives. Anthropology and economics have maintained a long and productive, if often combative, relationship with one another, and one of the aims of the course is to explore that relationship from a number of critical perspectives.

ANTH V3840 Urban life and Cultural Imagination in South Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

One of the most conspicuous changes in South Asia in the last decades has been the enormous growth of cities across the region. The rate of urbanization in South Asia has historically been relatively modest. Today, more than sixty five cities in South Asia have more than a million people, and there are hundreds of smaller cities around 300,000 to half a million people across the wider region. The World Bank projects that in less than a decade, India alone will have around half a billion people living in cities. Of these, at least a third and possibly more will be living in slums. Urban slums in India and elsewhere in the subcontinent are the most highly politicized places with more people voting and taking to the streets than anywhere else. The future of particularly India, but also other countries in the region, is undoubtedly urban, political power is urban, and new technologies and new cultural phenomena are all decidedly urban. This course has two aims: Firstly, to give the participants a strong overview of the historical development of cities and urban culture across the South Asian region from the pre-colonial cities until today. Secondly, the participants will be given a broad and sensitive introduction to many aspects of contemporary urban cultures, conflicts, identities, and experiential frames in South Asian cities. The readings will be work by critical historians and social theorists of South Asia, recent ethnographies of many aspects of contemporary urban life in South Asia’s cityscapes, popular novels, short stories, and films that address various aspects and mythologies of urban life in the region. 

ANTH V3842 The Semiotics of Crisis. 4 points.

Enrollment limit is 15 and preference given to anthropology majors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What do we mean when we say something is "in crisis"? How do we recognize crisis and what are the consequences of that recognition? We will approach these questions by revisiting and reclaiming several key texts from within and beyond anthropology on the intertwined problems of crisis and social reproduction

ANTH V3850 Psychoanalysis, Colonialism, and Race. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course investigates the complex relationships among colonialism, psychoanalysis, and race. The first part of the course examines the impacts of colonial ideologies of race on key Freudian theories, as well as the complicity of psychoanalysis in the colonial project. It then considers specific means by which imperial regimes shaped the subjectivities of colonizers and the colonized, including the application of theories and treatments connected to ethnopsychiatry. The second part of the course looks at racialized theories of mental illness and modes of social control in current mental health practice. After considering the global circulation of Freudian concepts, the course examines contemporary schools of psychoanalysis that revise classical understandings of mental structure, psychopathology, race, and therapeutic action. The course concludes with readings of recent case studies in cross-racial psychoanalysis. 

ANTH V3854 The Anthropology of Corruption. 4 points.

Enrollment limit is 15. Priority given to anthropology majors.

What is corruption? Is it-as we are prone to suspect-detrimental to social equality, political participation, and economic growth? Through texts on the anthropology of liberalism, exchange, post-colonialism, and witchcraft, this seminar will develop a critical perspective on corruption that both problematizes and takes these intuitive claims seriously.

ANTH V3855 Secular Modernity and Religious Authority. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course seeks to understand the relationship between secular and religious forms of authority in the modern world. Among topics to be considered include the rise of religiosity in the public and political spheres, tolerance and pluralism, and the legal organization of religious practices. 

ANTH V3856 Value, Debt, and Risk: Topics in the Anthropology of Finance. 4 points.

Enrollment limit is 15 and preference given to anthropology majors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar will construct a dual perspective on the intersection between culture and finance: On the one hand, we will examine finance as a culturally constituted social field; on the other, we will trace the far-reaching sociocultural consequences of financial concepts, practices, and discourses. The course is composed of two thematic parts: Money, Gifts, and Regimes of Value; and The Productivity of Risk and Crisis

ANTH V3860 Mythology. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is intended as an advanced seminar for anthropology students and others engaged in questions of social theory. Students must already have taken at least 2 anthropology courses and/or equivalent classes in social theory, religious studies, or philosophy. The course provides an in-depth exploration of both the theories of mythology that have dominated classical anthropology and four ‘case studies’ through which students will engage particular but recurrent problematics in the history of mythology. These case studies are drawn from a variety of contexts, and in their juxtaposition will provide the basis for a consideration of what it can mean to do a comparative study of mythology today. The ‘four case studies,’ address themselves to: 1), the animal-human relation; 2) the question of kinship; 3) the idea of sovereignty and the problem of the political; and 4) the myth of modernity, and the commodity economy. Select theoretical texts drawn from anthropology, literary criticism, history, and philosophy will provide the analytic terms through which these materials will be examined. 

ANTH V3861 Anthropology of the Anthropocene. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20. Priority given to majors in Anthropology.

This course focuses on the political ecology of the Anthropocene. As multiple publics become increasingly aware of the extensive and accelerated rate of current global environmental change, and the presence of anthropogenesis in ever expanding circumstances, we need to critically analyze the categories of thought and action being developed in order to carefully approach this change. Our concern is thus not so much the Anthropocene as an immutable fact, inevitable event, or definitive period of time (significant though these are), but rather for the political, social, and intellectual consequences of this important idea. Thus we seek to understand the creativity of "The Anthropocene" as a political, rhetorical, and social category. We also aim to examine the networks of capital and power that have given rise to the current state of planetary change, the strategies for ameliorating those changes, and how these are simultaneously implicated in the rhetorical creation of "The Anthropocene".

ANTH V3863 Ethnography of Indigenous Australia. 4 points.

Instructor's permission required.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Indigenous Australia has been of immense importance in the history of Anthropology as well as in the sociology of religion and psychoanalysis (e.g., Durkheim's Elementary Form and Freud's Totem and Taboo). Long an icon of radical Otherness in the Western imagination (see the movie Walkabout, for instance), indigenous Australians now contest the moods and tropes of that imagination with alternative modes of memory, film, visual art, and storytelling. 

ANTH V3872 From Physics Labs to Oil Futures: Social Studies of Energy. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How did whale oil become replaced by fossil fuels? What were the turning points in implementing electricity networks within urban centers? What is the role of markets and industries when producing such new energy infrastructures? This interdisciplinary course will trace ideas of energy in anthropology, science and technology studies, literary studies, and environmental history, and investigate how energy production and consumption affects social life.

ANTH V3873 Language and Politics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Language is central to political process. While all agree that language is used to symbolize or express political action, the main focus of this course is on how language and other communicative practices contribute to the creation of political stances, events, and forms of order. Topics addressed include political rhetoric and ritual; political communication and publics; discrimination and hierarchy; language and the legitimation of authority; as well as the role of language in nationalism, state formation, and in other sociopolitical movements, like feminism and diasporic communities. Since this course has the good fortune of coinciding with the 2012 U.S. Presidential election, we will make significant use of campaign rhetorics as a means of illustrating and exploring various themes.

ANTH V3875 Sensing Place, Placing Music. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 35.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class is an engagement between theoretical texts on the uses and production of space and place in Western modernity and conceptions of regional culture and identity in popular American imaginations, with particular emphasis on the genres commonly referred to as "roots" music. We begin by tracing a few major threads in theoretical treatments of place and space, with examples from phenomenological, historical materialist, and semiotic schools of thought. We will then attempt to distill the relevance of these approaches to lived experience by looking at a short selection of ethnographic accounts of the relationships among regional, class, and racial identities in the U.S. The ultimate goal is to bring the theoretical and ethnographic to bear upon articulations of what music anthropologist Steven Feld calls "senses of place" in performance of roots music, particularly early blues and country. To this end, we combine close, in-class listenings with historical readings on the popularity of these music genres, and their performers, in the 20th century. As a final task, students will be asked to examine, in light of the course readings, representations of place or place-based identity in a musical artifact of their choosing. 

ANTH V3876 Chinese Science and Medicine in East Asia and Beyond. 4 points.

Enrollment limit is 18Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the history and human impact of Chinese science and medicine in broad East Asian and transnational contexts. Using a socio-cultural approach, we will examine social, cultural, and political milieus within which various forms of science and medicine were practiced and understood across Chinese history and beyond the stereotypical "Chinese" boundary.

ANTH V3879 The Medical Imaginary. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor's permission required. Non anthropology majors require instructor's permission.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How might we speak of an imaginary within biomedicine? This course interrogates the ideological underpinnings of technocratic medicine in contexts that extend from the art of surgery to patient participation in experimental drug trials. Issues of scale will prove especially important in our efforts to track the medical imaginary from the whole, fleshy body to the molecular level. Key themes include everyday ethics; ways of seeing and knowing; suffering and hope; and subjectivity in a range of medical and sociomedical contexts.

ANTH V3882 Bodily Senses. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores how corporal senses (e.g., of touch, vision, smell listening) are formed through various sociocultural practices which render bodies, objects, and media part of a word ‘sensible.’ Upper-division seminar open to advanced undergraduates.

ANTH V3883 Anthropology of Cultural, Biological, and Linguistic Diversity. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Today, localities with high incidences of genetic, species, and ecosystem diversity more often than not map directly onto localities with high incidences of human cultural and linguistic diversity. These localities are generally in parts of the world that have been, until quite recently, at the frontiers of resource extraction, human migration and resettlement, and capital expansion. Extraction, migration, and economic expansion tend to result in a decrease in both biological and cultural diversity. People living in these diverse areas often fall into the lowest categories of indicators for poverty and are often desirous of economic development. Equally often are they targeted for economic development interventions by expansionist states and resource-hungry businesses. Conservation organizations often target these localities for protection because of the various forms of diversity found in them and because they also often have high numbers of species with restricted ranges. This course examines the articulation of biological, linguistic, and cultural diversity.

ANTH V3886 Signs and Wonders. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the dynamic interplay between "signs" - as evidence, knowledge, meaning, rationality - and "wonder(s)" - as passion, affect, sensation, but also as object, phenomenon, catalyst, and event - across a plurality of sites and registers: medieval theology, early modern science, and the colonial encounter; skepticism, mysticism, demonology, and fascism; psychoanalysis, art, poetry, film; digitality, virtuality, and special effects; Enlightenment Europe, Evangelical America, and postcolonial Africa; and beyond. What does wonder look like at the interface of madness, terror, and the sublime? What is this passion, this pathos, that can lead both to tireless critical inquiry and to unquestioning, indeed totalitarian, discipleship? How do signs and wonders become political technologies? At the outer reaches of knowability, how have marvels, wonders, miracles, and monstrosities been constructed, sensed, mastered, and mass-mediatized in different times and places? And finally, if, as Socrates believed, philosophy begins in wonder, can we say the same for anthropology? What exactly is the sensation - the awe, curiosity, fascination, even horror - of anthropology's encounter with its worlds? Along with ethnographic and historical texts, readings will include Lévi-Strauss, Viveiros de Castro, Ingold, Lingis, Daston and Park, Greenblatt, Rubenstein, Benjamin, Freud, Tarde, Deleuze, and Canetti.

ANTH V3887 The Anthropology of Palestine. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the relationship between different forms of knowledge about Palestinians and the political and social history of the region. It explores the complex interplay of state, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and class at both local and global levels in constructing what Palestine is and who Palestinians are. The course takes up diverse areas, from graphic novels to archaeological sites, from news reporting to hiking trails, to study how Palestine is created and recreated. Students will gain a familiarity with anthropological concepts and methodological approaches to Palestine. They will become familiar with aspects of the social organization, historical developments, and political events that have shaped the region over the last century. The course is also intended to develop students’ skills in written and oral communication, analysis, ethnographic observation, and critical thinking.

ANTH V3889 The Productivity of Crisis. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In what sense are crises productive? How is it that destruction, loss, and rupture can serve as the constituent features of a social order? We will approach these questions by revisiting and reclaiming several key texts - from within and beyond anthropology - on the intertwined problems of crisis and social reproduction. 

ANTH V3890 Migrant Dreams & Realities: Anthropology of Migration & Trafficking of Women. 4 points.

This course explores the problematic of contemporary migration through a welfare and labor regimes, human rights claims, immigration rules, public debates, and interethnic experience has informed the movement of women, and have worked in terms of controlling women's bodies, subjectivities, sexual health, labor and migration.


ANTH V3891 Anthropology of Art. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required.

Art has been understood and conceptualized in a variety of ways. In Western public culture, art has been commonly regarded in terms of autonomous creativity and individual genius. In former socialist countries, the state emphasized the social obligations of the artist to the collective good. Anthropologists challenged these understandings of art as an activity separate from the everyday life by providing accounts of contexts where creativity is intrinsically connected to ritual life, and artifacts are an expression of the connection to the land and ancestry. In light of trade, colonialism, and more recently, economic globalization, there has been a lot of traffic in people and commodities between these aesthetic and socioeconomic regime-also the subject of prolific anthropological inquiry. This course offers an exploration of all these discussions, and proposes an understanding of art as embedded in its surrounding social context rather than existing as a universal self-standing category.

ANTH V3892 Contemporary Central Asia (formerly ANTH V2029). 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 30. First-come, first-serve basis.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course investigates contemporary Central Asia as a specific context of post-socialist and postcolonial transition to newly independent statehood in the aftermath of global Cold War politics. Drawing on cultural artifacts and scholarly analyses, this course introduces students to Central Asian politics, economy, society, and culture. We will survey the processes related to macro-political and economic structure, such as democratization, market reforms, and nation-building, in conjunction with the everyday life of communities. Besides scholarly accounts of Central Asia, course materials include films, artworks, and internet discussions forums.

ANTH V3893 The Bomb. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The first part of the course focuses on the history of the creation of the atomic bomb and the aftermath of its use during World War II. We look at the socialization of the scientists involved in the birth of the bomb; at the devastation it wrought in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and at the physical and psychological injuries that afflicted its survivors, especially the immediate and long-term effects of radiation poisoning and trauma. The course then considers the Cold War period, examining civil defense campaigns, the cultural features of weapons laboratories, and the devastating physical and environmental contamination suffered by communities—disproportionately composed of indigenous populations—where such weapons repeatedly have been tested. The second part of the course explores the transformative cultural and psychological consequences of living with the bomb. Readings consider the evidence of spontaneous psychic adaptations to life in the nuclear age. They also examine governments’ deliberate attempts to shape citizens’ cognitive and emotional lives. How do states produce political subjects who comply with military imperatives? What role does the continual manufacture of foreign threats and enemies play in this process? While acknowledging the powerful forces that seek to control public perceptions of nuclear arms by minimizing their destructive potential, the course concludes by considering organized resistances to increasing nuclear proliferation and to militarism.

ANTH V3894 African Futures. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Although polemical and demonizing visions of Africa continue to proliferate within various quarters of public discourse, scholarly characterizations are more agnostic, tending to cycle between the fatalistic and upbeat. "Africa," it seems, has become a montage of competing destinies: alongside accounts of unrelenting debt and extreme precarity, war machines and disposable populations, occult imaginaries, and eviscerated states, we are given vibrant sketches of a continent to come, of novel styles of life, and habits of self-creation. This course explores the contours of Africa's variegated present through engagement with its emergent social and cultural forms: the refiguring of the city through the informal and the informational, state pullback and a privatized commons, development projects and humanitarian interventions, the intoxicating efflorescence of miracles and so many prosperity gospels, new techniques of law and criminality, experimental forms of violence and warfare, newly public - and vigorously ostracized - modes of intimacy, and desire. Engaging these issues from a cross-disciplinary perspective, with materials spanning the ethnographic and historical to the literary and philosophical, this course will serve as a critical introduction to the debates, concepts, and orientations through which African futures are being produced and apprehended.

ANTH V3895 Anthropology and the Politics of Climate Change. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course addresses the ways that we can understand the variety of issues and challenges facing individuals, organizations, and nations as we come to understand and combat anthropogenic climate change. Drawing on work in anthropology, sociology, geography, and other disciplines, this course will examine how climate change is affecting and will continue to affect communities worldwide, concepts of risk and vulnerability, the role of science and local knowledge, and the social contexts of policies and actions.

ANTH V3899 Food, Ecology, Globalization. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

ANTH V3903 Cities: Ethnoarchaeology, Archaeology and Theory. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20, plus instructor's permission required.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine cities in comparative perspective, over time and space, from several viewpoints. We will examine how and when they develop, how they function, and what urban life is like. Is the urban experience the same for all residents? At all times? In all places? We will begin with theory and some urban history and then focus on New York as a laboratory, from its origins to the present. The course involves a kind of archaeology called "ethnoarchaeology" in which we look at living societies and communities in order to gain a better understanding of past and present. Our examination of contemporary urban life pays special attention to spatial organization and order, the geography of power in the urban landscape, and to material things, as these are the kinds of data that archaeologists typically focus on.

ANTH V3906 Functional Linguistics and Language Typology. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to functional linguistics and language typology. Functional linguistics involves describing, classifying and explaining the relation between linguistic form (e.g., various grammatical patterns embodied in phonology, morphology, and syntax) and linguistic function (e.g., the ends communicative utterances serve and the meanings grammatical categories encode). Language typology involves describing and comparing the forms and functions of the world’s languages in order to uncover, classify, and explain cross-linguistic patterns.

ANTH V3908 Global Economy In Anthropological Perspective. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course focuses on how anthropologists theorize and study globalization. We will explore contemporary theories and methods, as well as trace historical trajectories in anthropological engagement with regional trade, production, and labor systems. Many of the questions about globalization revolve around cultural confrontations and social, political and economic transformations. Observers of these processes in multiple disciplines attempt to answer similar questions. How trade systems transformed production and labor in participating areas in other periods of history? How is identity reconfigured and manipulated in contemporary globalization? How are forms of identity commoditized and marketed in global transactions? What forms of resistance to globalization have emerged, where, and why? How do issues of race, gender, class, ethnicity, and religion intersect in global labor settings? How are sexualities, bodies and body parts implicated in global economies of consumption? The anthropological encounter with these complex issues invokes particular theories and methodologies. Fieldwork, longitudinal engagement with issues and locations, multi-sited studies, and following commodity chains are some of the current methods used to uncover the voices and perspectives various actors bring to encounters. Selected ethnographies, case studies, fiction and other forms of media all explore the lived experience of globalized work, travel, and technological encounters at various sites of interaction.

ANTH V3913 Ancient Egyptian Culture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced cultures in antiquity. This course will go beyond the pyramids and pharaohs to investigate the culture and daily life of the ancient Egyptians from the Old Kingdom to the Hellenistic period. Students will learn about ancient Egyptian magic, emotion, cosmogony, education, recreation, travel, and diplomacy by reading ancient Egyptian folklore, dream spells, love poetry, wisdom texts, religious hymns, and royal propaganda in translation. In addition to exploring the laws, occupations, and medical knowledge of the ancient Egyptians, we will also analyze how gender, race, sexuality, class, and disability were constructed and represented.

ANTH V3914 Indigeneity in the Andes. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

While historically important, indigenous identity or indigeneity has become an increasingly powerful idiom for reimagining collective action and remaking sociopolitical demands in the Andes. Many scholars, activists, and politicians go so far as to speak of a "return of the ayllu," referring to the traditional unit of social, political, and economic organization among highland Aymara and Quechua peoples. With good reason, they point to recent social mobilizations (like the "gas war" in the "indigenous city" of El Alto, Bolivia) and a sea-change in national politics (the ascendancy of Evo Morales and Ollanta Humala to the presidency in Bolivia and Peru, both of whom claim indigenous affiliations, Aymara and Quechua, respectively) as evidence of the crucial role indigeneity now plays, as a structure for making sociopolitical demands, in Andean societies. Through a range of historical and ethnographic readings, this course will explore the past and present of "claiming indigeneity" in the Andes. Special emphasis will be placed upon the Quechua and Aymara peoples of what is now highland Peru and Bolivia, seeing how indigenous cultural practices and understandings of indigeneity emerged and changed, from the Spanish Conquest to the colonial period to the modernization and multiculturalist projects of the nation-state.

ANTH V3917 Social Theory and Radical Critique in Ethnic Studies. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

     

ANTH V3918 Sufism in Central Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will explore Sufism in Central Asia under czarist and Soviet rule to the present day from an anthropological perspective. The seminar will begin with a broad overview of the origins and historical development of different Sufi orders throughout Central Asia, particularly the Naqshbandiyya, Yasawiyya, and Qadiriyya orders. We will cover Sufism in Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Xinjiang, and the Caucasus. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of Sufism, the political role of Sufism, Sufi-inspired music, and the multifarious portrayals of Sufis as miraculous healers, elite soldiers, wandering dervishes, indispensible powerbrokers and raving madmen.

ANTH V3920 Economy and Society in Prehistory. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Archaeology or permission of the instructor required.

       

ANTH V3922 The Emergence of State. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The creation of the earliest states out of simpler societies was a momentous change in human history. This course examines major theories proposed to account for that process, including population pressure, warfare, urbanism, class conflict, technological innovation, resource management, political conflict and cooperation, economic specialization and exchange, religion/ideology, and information processing.

ANTH V3923 Colonialism and the Intellectual. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is a consideration of the choices and dilemmas faced by the category of intellectuals who have been labeled ‘colonial intellectuals’.

ANTH V3924 Anthropology and Disaster. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course examines various approaches to the study and representation of natural and humanly caused disasters. Course readings include eyewitness accounts of calamities, personal memoirs of genocide, and ethnographic reports of the aftermath of floods, earthquakes, political violence, and nuclear reactor explosions. The course also considers conventional patterns of disaster response, as well as shifting notions of disaster preparedness that have emerged since 9/11. It concludes with an examination of post-disaster reconstruction, looking at the ways social divisions, economic conditions and political interests invariably affect the cultural, public health, and psychological repercussions of disasters.

ANTH V3926 Rewriting Modernity: Transculturation and the Postcolonial Intellectual. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is an examination of how postcolonial intellectuals have participated in the creation and contesting of alternative/multiple/’fugitive’ modernities.

ANTH V3928 Religious Mediation. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 16. Instructor's permission is required.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Reading theories of media and of religion, we will examine how transformations in media technology shift the ways in which religion is encoded into semiotic forms, how these forms are realized in performative contexts, and how these affect the constitution of religious subjects and religious authority. Topics include word, print, image, and sound in relation to Islam, Pentecostalism, Buddhism and animist religions.

ANTH V3929 Ancient Egyptian Civilization. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is an introduction to the civilization of ancient Egypt, beginning with the pyramids and ending with Hellenistic Alexandria. We will analyze artistic and archaeological evidence, such as tomb decoration, temples, pyramids, mummies, papyri, and sanctuary, to understand the ancient Egyptian civilization through material culture. Students will become familiar with the legendary pharaohs, hieroglyphic writing, and elaborate mythology of ancient Egypt. We will also investigate the most recent discoveries and controversies in Egyptology.  

ANTH V3937 Mass-Mediations of Modernity. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: at least one course in anthropology or social theory.

How do new media technologies affect social worlds? What is the relationship between mass mediation and modernity? Explores the force of media technology and its relationship to transnational forms of capital, to the development of new subjectivities, and to the rise of new networks of power and social relations.

ANTH V3943 Youth and Identity Politics in Africa. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor is required.

Examines ways in which African youth inevitably occupy two extremes in academic writings and the mass media: as victims of violence, or as instigators of social chaos. Considers youth as generating new cultural forms, as historically relevant actors, and informed social and/or political critics. At the core of such critiques lie possibilities for the agentive power of youth in Africa. 

ANTH V3946 African Popular Culture. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required.

       

ANTH V3947 Text, Magic, Performance. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course pursues interconnections linking text and performance in light of magic, ritual, possession, narration, and related articulations of power. Readings are drawn from classic theoretical writings, colonial fiction, and ethnographic accounts. Domains of inquiry include: spirit possession, trance states, séance, witchcraft, ritual performance, and related realms of cinematic projection, musical form, shadow theater, performative objects, and (other) things that move on their own, compellingly. Key theoretical concerns are subjectivity - particularly, the conjuring up and displacement of self in the form of the first-person singular "I" - and the haunting power of repetition. Retraced throughout the course are the uncanny shadows of a fully possessed subject.

ANTH V3949 Sorcery and Magic. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 40.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

An introduction to the occult sides of making history, colonialism, and transforming reality through the study of south American shamanism, magic in Shakespeare's Tempest, sexual magic in politics and dictatorships, the uncanniness in Freud's hysterics, and William Burroughs' Cities of the Red Night.

ANTH V3950 Anthropology of Consumption. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Examines theories and ethnographies of consumption, as well as the political economy of production and consumption. Compares historic and current consumptive practices, compares exchange-based economies with post-Fordist economies. Engages the work of Mauss, Marx, Godelier, Baudrillard, Appadurai, and Douglas, among others.

ANTH V3951 Pirates, Boys, and Capitalism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3952 Taboo and Transgression. 4 points.

Instructor's permission is required.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The transgression of taboos is the basis of crime, sex, and religion in any society. As "the labor of the negative", transgression is also a critical element in thought itself. Working through anthropology of sacrifice and obscenity, as well as relevant work by Bataille, Foucault, and Freud, this course aims at understanding why taboos exist and why they must be broken.

ANTH V3954 Bodies and Machines: Anthropologies of Technology. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Examines how bodies become mechanized and machines embodied. Studies shifts in the status of the human under conditions of capitalist commodification and mass mediation. Readings consist of works on the fetish, repetition and automaticity, reification, and late modern technoprosthesis.

ANTH V3960 The Culture of Public Art and Display In New York City. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 16.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Students must sign-up in the Anthropology Department prior to registering for this course.

A field course and seminar considering the aesthetic, political, and sociocultural aspects of selected city museums, public spaces, and window displays.

ANTH V3961 Subsequent Performances. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Priority given to upper class Anthropology and Music majors; students must attend operas outside of class.

Explores the dynamic interaction between operatic compositions (especially Mozart's Don Giovanni and The Marriage of Figaro) and their subsequent performances, with particular emphasis on the cultural, political, and economic contexts that shape both the original composition and the following reproductions. Critical apparatus includes Abbate and Butler.

ANTH V3962 History and Memory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3969 Specters of Culture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Pursues the spectral effects of culture in the modern. Traces the ghostly remainders of cultural machineries, circuitries of voice, and representational forms crucial to modern discourse networks through a consideration of anthropologically significant, primarily nonwestern sites and various domains of social creation - performance, ritual practice, narrative production, and technological invention. 

ANTH V3970 Biological Basis of Human Variation. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ANEB V1010 and the instructor's permission.

Biological evidence for the modern human diversity at the molecular, phenotypical, and behavioral levels, as distributed geographically.

ANTH V3974 Lost Worlds, Secret Spaces: Modernity and the Child. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Examines the figure of the child in modernity. Study of children and the delineation of a special time called childhood have been crucial to the modern imagination; for example, the child tended to be assimilated to the anthropological notion to the "primitive" (and vice versa), with repercussions ranging from psychoanalysis to painting, from philosophy to politics. Engages the centrality of the child through interdisciplinary readings in anthropology, history, children's literature, art criticism, educational theory, and psychology.

ANTH V3976 Anthropology and Science. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH V3977 Trauma. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission.

Investing trauma from interdisciplinary perspectives, the course explores connections between the interpersonal, social, and political events that precipitate traumatic reactions and their individual and collective ramifications. After examining the consequences of political repression and violence, the spread of trauma within and across communities, the making of memories and flashbacks, and the role of public testimony and psychotherapy in alleviating traumatic reactions.

ANTH V3978 Dialogic Imagination in Opera. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 14. Priority given to upper class Anthropology and Music majors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission via email at: mec3@columbia.edu. Must state year, major, and why you wish to join the class.

The dialogic imagination focuses upon 3 remarkable stories beginning with the young freedom fighter Franco Zeffirelli, who later became a major figure in opera in Italy, as well as in the US. As a teenager, Zeffirelli fought against Mussolini and twice was close to death by firing squad, but each time escaped through unexpected felicities. Students in the class will choose one Zeffirelli opera to analyze. The second story analyzed Platee: Prologue and 3 acts were first presented at Versailles by Command of the French King on Le mecredi Tuesday 31 of March 1745, playing the music of Rameau. In 2003, Music Director Marc Minkowski revitalized the French music with innovative sounds and staging, whereas, in 1998, Director Jonathan Miller created his stunning re-articulation of The Marriage of Figaro, first written and performed in 1786 and performed in New York in 1998 to considerable acclaim.

ANTH V3979 Fluent Bodies. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The recent proliferation of writings on the social significations of the human body have brought to the fore the epistemological, disciplinary, and ideological structures that have participated in creating a dimension of the human body that goes beyond its physical consideration. The course, within the context of anthropology, has two considerations, a historical one and a contemporary one. If anthropology can be construed as the study of human society and culture, then, following Marcel Mauss, this study must be considered the actual, physical bodies that constitute the social and the cultural.

ANTH V3980 Nationalism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Intended for seniors, but not necessarily anthropology majors.

This course will cover the basic readings in the contemporary debate over nationalism. It will cover different disciplinary approaches and especially look at recent studies of nationalism in the formerly colonial world as well as in the industrial West. The readings will offer a mix of both theoretical and empirical studies. The readings include the following: 1) Eric Hobsbawm's Nationalism since 1780; 2) Ernest Gillner's Nations and Nationalism; 3) Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities; 4) Anthony Smith's The Ethnic Origins of Nations; 5) Linda Coley's Britons; 6) Peter Sahlins's Boundaries; and 7) Partha Chatterjee's The Nation and Its Fragments.

ANTH V3983 Ideas and Society in the Caribbean. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focusing on the Anglo-Creole Caribbean, this course examines some aspects of popular culture, literary expression, political change, and intellectual movements over the past thirty years.

ANTH V3988 Race/Sexuality Science and Social Practice. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 26.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Scientific inquiry has configured race and sex in distinctive ways. This class will engage critical theories of race and feminist considerations of sex, gender, and sexuality through the lens of the shifting ways in which each has been conceptualized, substantiated, classified, and managed in (social) science and medicine.

ANTH V3994 Anthropology of Extremity: War. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH W3201 Introductory Survey of Biological Anthropology. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH W4001 The Ancient Empires. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ANTH V1002 or the instructor's permission.

       

ANTH W4002 Controversial Topics in Human Evolution. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and introductory biological/physical anthropology course.

ANTH W4011 Critical Social Theory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 30.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: junior standing.

     

ANTH W4022 Political Ecology. 3 points.

Enrollment limit is 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Analyzes global, national, and local environment issues from the critical perspectives of political ecology. Explores themes like the production of nature, environmental violence, environmental justice, political decentralization, territoriality, the state, and the conservation interventions.

ANTH W4024 Anthropology of Europe. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What constitutes an anthropology of Europe? Explores the anthropological imagination of Europe as a cultural category through detailed studies of selected ethnographies and the history of anthropological research in Europe, from post-war concerns with modernization and vanishing peasants, to current debates over European identity and unity

ANTH W4033 Historical Archaeology of the Modern World. 3 points.

Enrollment limit is 30.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of the archaeology of the modern world-the era that began with European voyages of discovery and conquest in the fifteenth century and continues into the present. Using case studies from the Americas, Europe, South Africa, and Australia, we will examine the way historical archaeologists use artifacts, structures, landscapes, along with oral, documentary, and visual sources to interpret the past. Subjects include comparative colonialism in the Americas; plantations and slavery; landscape and buildings archaeology; archaeology of gender and sexuality; and the archaeology of African Americans, Irish Americans, Asian Americans, and other racial and ethnic groups. By the end of the semester students should be familiar with the methodology of historical archaeology and the theoretical issues that guide interpretation in historical archaeology towards an understanding of the processes that have helped shaped modernity.

ANTH W4042 Agent, Person, Subject, Self. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Treats the interrelated notions of agent, person, subject, and self from a semiotic and social perspective.

ANTH W4065 Archaeology of Idols. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Explores 40,000 years of the human creation of, entanglement with, enchantment by, and violence towards idols. Case studies roam from the Paleolithic to Petra and from the Hopi to the Taliban, and the theoretical questions posed include the problem of representation, iconoclasm, fetishism and the sacred.

ANTH W4172 Written Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

At the turn of the twentieth century, writing was considered the evolutionary “hallmark” of civilization. Its presence or absence in societies also served to demarcate the boundaries of disciplinary inquiry, with anthropologists then specialized in peoples “without” writing. In recent decades, however, as critical reflection began to focus on writings by anthropologists, attention also turned to what James Clifford referred to as “the scratching of other pens.” Studies of our own and other textualities now are part of advancing conversations between Anthropology, History and Literary Studies. Among other topics, we will study the earlier print revolution for ideas that might help us understand "texting" and other aspects of writing in the current digital revolution.

ANTH W4200 Fossil Evidence of Human Evolution. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ANEB V1010 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Intended for advanced undergraduates and begnning graduate students who are interested in paleoanthropology. Provides a closer look at what comprises the fossil evidence for human evolution from the australopithecines of 4 million years ago to the fully modern human species of 25,000 years ago. Involves hands-on examination of the departmental casts.

ANTH W4282 Islamic Law. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introductory survey of the history and contents of the Shari'a, combined with a critical review of Orientalist and contemporary scholarship on Islamic law. In addition to models for the ritual life, we will examine a number of social, economic, and political constructs contained in Shari`a doctrine, including the concept of an Islamic state, and we also will consider the structure of litigation in courts. Seminar paper.

ANTH W4316 Textures of the City: Mapping New York’s Present Past. 4 points.

Permission of the instructor is required and enrollment limit is 16. Enrollment priorities: Archaeology and related fields (undergraduate and graduate)

This class explores how to map and visually represent New York's history and the continuing presence of past traces in the city. Students will receive training in the key archaeological techniques of landscape analysis and digital (GIS) mapping. We will draw on available archaeological evidence, landscape analysis, and documentary sources to map and explore different aspects of the city's past. We will critically assess what different mapping techniques offer, and what kind of narratives they underpin or foreclose upon. How do we draw upon such evidence as archaeologists and historians to represent and mediate the city's past?

ANTH W4340 Cinemas of the Maghreb (Morocco, Alegira, Tunisia). 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course focuses on one expressive form (cinema) in one predominantly Arab Muslim region (the Maghreb, comprising the nations of Morocco, Tunisia, and Algeria), as part of an anthropological effort to explore the ways in which films taken individually and a nation’s cinema as a whole can help us understand society. The discussion of films and filmmakers will be set in the historical, political, cultural, and social contexts of the individual countries and of the region. The approach will combine historical and thematic perspectives, highlighting differences and similarities from country to country, from film to film, and from filmmaker to filmmaker. 

ANTH W4346 Laboratory Techniques. 3 points.

$25.00 mandatory laboratory fee.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Training in general archaeological methods. Data recording techniques, preparation of reports and illustration, etc. 

ANTH W4358 Ireland. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH W4440 Conflict Talk and the Legal Process. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines conflict talk and conflict-solving mechanisms in various communicative environments. Through a review of the most significant studies in legal anthropology and conflict talk, explores issues such as the public nature of conflict talk, its referentiality, the structural practices involved in this process, and the roles played by power and by communicative performances to reach a judgement and carry out a sentence. 

ANTH W4444 Cultures of Terror: Anthropological Perspective On Political Violence. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH W4450 Of Mimicry and Membership: Eastern Europe of Postcolonialism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course addresses social and cultural processes currently taking place in the formerly socialist Eastern Europe focusing on how postsocialist lives are defined, experienced and understood by those living them. Among the topics discussed are emerging forms of nationalism, gender relations, language use, production and consumption, identification with place, and emigration and diaspora. 

ANTH W4625 Anthropology and Film. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH W4636 Animals, Transformation, Secrecy. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH W4638 Anthropology of Media. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

ANTH W4647 Law, History and Anthropology (formerly G6170). 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The study of legal institutions, the utilization of case materials, and the critical analysis of legal texts. Recent social historical and ethnographic work on trial procedures, evidence regimes, legal writing, interpretation, and disciplinary systems. Non-Western, premodern and colonial materials shed comparative light on Western notions of law, truth and justice.

The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors as may become necessary.