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Fall Update

At SPS this fall, all courses, other than pre-established online courses, will be offered face-to-face in our New York City classrooms. Some of these face-to-face courses will be offered in the HyFlex format to ensure that all of our students can make progress toward their degree requirements, if faced with delays due to student visas or vaccination effectiveness wait times.
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Greg Witkowski

Senior Lecturer in the Discipline of Nonprofit Management; Affiliate Faculty, National Center for Disaster Preparedness

Gregory R. Witkowski is a senior lecturer of nonprofit management and affiliate faculty at the National Center for Disaster Preparedness.  He is the series editor of the Georgetown University Press Series “Philanthropy, Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organizations,” which publishes books for scholars and practitioners. 

Witkowski has taught across the curriculum from bachelors to masters to doctoral students.  He currently teaches the introductory course, “Role and Unique Nature of the Nonprofit Sector” and “Disaster and Community: Philanthropic and Nonprofit Engagement.”  The latter is Columbia’s first graduate course focused on philanthropic giving and nonprofit roles in disaster relief and recovery.  Before joining the faculty at Columbia, he helped found the first school dedicated to the study of philanthropy at Indiana University, where he was associate professor and director of graduate programs.   

His current research is on the role of philanthropy and nonprofit organizations in the relief, recovery and reconstruction of New York City after the 9/11 attacks. This singular American event transformed how we respond to disasters, teaching nonprofit leaders valuable lessons on how to work more efficiently, effectively, collaboratively and creatively to affect a greater positive impact.  As nonprofits are once again on the front lines providing for social needs in a pandemic, this book will also indicate the long-tail of recovery and how disasters continue to impact individuals for years after the triggering event.

Witkowski has authored or edited three books:  The Campaign State, German Philanthropy in Transatlantic Perspective, and the forthcoming Hoosier Philanthropy.  He has also contributed additional chapters to prominent edited volumes and articles published in scholarly journals. His research focuses on both local interactions where the majority of philanthropic gifts go and on transnational giving, which add the complication of cross-cultural exchange.  The Social Science Research Council, American Historical Association, German Academic Exchange, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the New York Public Library, Rockefeller Archive Center, and Columbia University have all supported Witkowski through grants.

He has published and been quoted in national publications including The New York Times, The Hill, The Chronicle of Philanthropy and the Associated Press, as well as the Houston Chronicle and the Seattle Times. He was selected as a Fulbright Scholar and a Young Leader by the American Swiss Foundation.

Courses:

  • NOPM PS5290: Role and Unique Nature of the Nonprofit Sector
  • NOPM PS5210: Disaster and Community: Philanthropic and Nonprofit Engagement

Education

  • Ph.D., University at Buffalo
  • B.A., College of Holy Cross

 

Publications

Books

Gregory R. Witkowski, The Campaign State.  DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2017.

Gregory R. Witkowski and Arnd Bauerkaemper, eds. German Philanthropy in Transatlantic Perspective, Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag, 2016

Recent Essays

Gregory R. Witkowski "Funny Money: Philanthropic Giving and the Money Illusion," Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, vol. 50 no 1 (2021).

Gregory R. Witkowski, “Captains of Philanthropy?  The Legacy of Pittsburgh’s Most Famous Donors,” in A Gift of Belief, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021

Gregory R. Witkowski and Dwight Burlingame, “The Arc of Philanthropy and Pittsburgh’s Evolution,” in A Gift of Belief, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021