Students should contact the departmental representative with course-related questions.

Arts in the Summer with the School of the Arts

If you’re interested in only taking courses offered by the School of the Arts this summer we have a simple application process that will allow you take courses in Film, Writing, Visual Arts, or Theatre. Whether you’re a beginning artist or an experienced practitioner, you can be part of Arts in the Summer with the School of the Arts. Please note that high school students are not eligible for this application process.

Tuition and fees can be found found under our Undergraduate Visiting Students category here.

Deadlines

Application Deadlines

Enrollment Priority Deadline: February 1
Apply by February 1 in order to register by February 27, when registration opens.

Application Fee Waiver Deadline: March 1
March 1 is the final day to submit your application without the $80 application fee.

Final Deadline: April 1

See detailed registration and session dates >
Review visa requirements for international students >

Application Requirements

This application is for students that only want to take the courses listed on this page. High school students are not eligible for this application process. If you’re looking to take arts courses along with courses in other subjects, you need to follow the application process for our Visiting or Adults & Professionals student categories.

Applicants whose native language is not English are expected to meet or exceed the program minimum language requirements. Submission of test scores is not required as part of the application process.

Read conditions and details.

English Language Proficiency Test Minimum Required Score
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) iBt 100+
TOEFL PBT 600+
International English Language Testing System (IELTS) 7.0+
Pearson Test of English-Academic (PTE-A) 72+
Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) Grade C or better
Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) C1 Certificate or higher
Cambridge First Certificate in English (FCE) Grade A (low C1)
Cambridge Business Higher Grade C or better

 

Mailing Address and Contact Information

Office of Enrollment Management
School of Professional Studies
203 Lewisohn Hall
2970 Broadway, Mail Code 4119
New York, NY 10027-6902

Phone 212-854-9666
Email summersessions@columbia.edu
Office hours
Monday–Friday 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Notification of Admissions Decision

Decision notifications are sent via email. Admission decisions are typically communicated 5-7 business days after an application is complete.

Courses

FILM S0431D Television Writing Intensive- Non Credit. 0 points.

Requires separate application with portfolio samples, see description for details. ,,Priority Deadline: March 15th- Qualified applicants who apply by this date have first priority for admission,Final Deadline: April 7th- Last date to submit an application for available spaces.
Fee: Course Fee - 200.00

Prerequisites: apply directly to the School of the Arts. For more information please see: http://arts.columbia.edu/summer/film/course/television-writing-intensive.

International Students are not eligible for this course, as it does not provide academic credit. The TV Writing Intensive is a six-week, concentrated and encompassing introduction into the field of television writing designed to prepare students to join the professional worlds of half-hour comedies and one-hour dramas across network, cable and digital platforms. In an interconnected program consisting of two intensive writing workshops and a lecture series with guest writers and producers, students gain the knowledge and authority to explore, examine and create the kind of groundbreaking work that is taking over television here and around the world. Participants in The Television Writing Intensive learn about half-hour comedy and one-hour drama by writing and developing spec scripts and original pilots.  A spec script is a teleplay for an existing show where the writer brings original stories to existing characters.  A pilot is a script written for an original series that the writer creates. This intensive course meets 15 hours per week, on Mondays and Wednesdays for six hours during the day, and Thursdays for two hours. The times for the Thursday class are usually in the evenings but may vary based on the availability of guest speakers and other opportunities such as visits to live production sets.

Summer 2017: FILM S0431D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 0431 001/12430 M W 10:00am - 5:30pm
507 Dodge Building
Alan Kingsberg, Charlie Rubin, John Burkhardt 0 13/19
FILM 0431 001/12430 Th 6:00pm - 8:00pm
511 Dodge Building
Alan Kingsberg, Charlie Rubin, John Burkhardt 0 13/19

FILM S2295Q World Cinema: Mexico. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Just Added

The global success of film directors Alejandro González Iñárritu, Alfonso Cuarón, and Guillermo del Toro has attracted much attention to the New Mexican Cinema. Yet this «Nuevo cine mexicano» cannot be understood without knowing the traditions of Mexico’s intricate film history. This course explores the numerous tendencies of Mexican cinema through the analysis of its most representative genres, features, and directors since the so called Golden Age (1938-1957). An in-depth analysis of films such as Emilio Fernández’s María Candelaria (1943), Luis Buñuel’s Los olvidados (1950), Jomi García Ascot’s On the Empty Balcony (1962), Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Mole (1970), and Arturo Ripstein's Deep Crimson (1996) will contribute to define the characteristics of the most relevant «national» genres – from 1940s melodramas to 1970s acid Westerns and 1990s crime films. The study of the New Mexican Cinema of Iñárritu (Amores perros, 2000), Cuarón (Y tu mamá también, 2001), and del Toro (Pan's Labyrinth, 2006) will also comprise an examination of the complex relationship between the US and Mexican film industries, as well as a critique of the very notion of «national identity» in today’s globalized world. We will also analyze new tendencies in commercial, experimental, and documentary Mexican films – including Carlos Reygadas' Silent Light (2007) and Pedro González Rubio's Alamar (2009). CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement.

Summer 2017: FILM S2295Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2295 001/13599 T Th 9:00am - 1:00pm
507 Dodge Building
Breixo Viejo Vinas 3 20/20

FILM S3040D The Television Writing Intensive. 6 points.

Requires separate application with writing samples see description for details.,,Priority Deadline: March 15th- Qualified applicants who apply by this date have first priority for admission,Final Deadline: April 7th- Last date to submit an application for available spaces.
Fee: Materials Fee - 200.00

Prerequisites: apply directly to the School of the Arts. For more information please see: http://arts.columbia.edu/summer/film/course/television-writing-intensive.

The TV Writing Intensive is a six-week, concentrated and encompassing introduction into the field of television writing designed to prepare students to join the professional worlds of half-hour comedies and one-hour dramas across network, cable and digital platforms. In an interconnected program consisting of two intensive writing workshops and a lecture series with guest writers and producers, students gain the knowledge and authority to explore, examine and create the kind of groundbreaking work that is taking over television here and around the world. Participants in The Television Writing Intensive learn about half-hour comedy and one-hour drama by writing and developing spec scripts and original pilots.  A spec script is a teleplay for an existing show where the writer brings original stories to existing characters.  A pilot is a script written for an original series that the writer creates. This intensive course meets 15 hours per week, on Mondays and Wednesdays for six hours during the day, and Thursdays for two hours. The times for the Thursday class are usually in the evenings but may vary based on the availability of guest speakers and other opportunities such as visits to live production sets.

Summer 2017: FILM S3040D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3040 001/72378 M W 10:00am - 5:30pm
508 Dodge Building
Alan Kingsberg, Charlie Rubin, John Burkhardt 6 6/24
FILM 3040 001/72378 Th 6:00pm - 8:00pm
C01 80 Claremont
Alan Kingsberg, Charlie Rubin, John Burkhardt 6 6/24

FILM S3833D Lab Producing in Low Budget Film. 3 points.

This practical lab focuses on the fundamental aspects of development, planning and preparation for low budget films. While using a short film script as their own case study – students will learn pitching, development, script breakdown, scheduling, budgeting and fundraising. Discussion of legal issues, location scouting, deliverables, marketing, distribution and film festival strategy will allow students to move forward with their own projects after completing the class. Using weekly assignments, in-class presentations and textbook readings to reinforce each class discussion topic, students will complete the class having created a final prep/production binder for their project, which includes the script breakdown, production schedule, line item budget, financing/fundraising plan and film festival strategy for their chosen script. 

Summer 2017: FILM S3833D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3833 001/14691 T Th 1:00pm - 4:10pm
507 Dodge Building
Jamund Washington 3 11/12

FILM S4037D Screenwriting I: Introduction to Screenwriting. 3 points.


Fee: Materials Fee - 30.00

Modern feature-length screenplays demand a specific architecture. In this class students will enter with an idea for a film, and during the first eight sessions build a coherent treatment; that is, a summary of the events and major emotional arcs of the film's three acts. In the final four sessions students will begin and complete the first act of their feature-length screenplay.

Summer 2017: FILM S4037D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 4037 001/11166 M W 10:00am - 1:00pm
409 Dodge Building
Loren-Paul Caplin 3 13/15

FILM S4138D Auteur Study: Steven Spielberg. 3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 50.00

Steven Spielberg may be the world’s most influential living film director. His uncanny grasp of visual storytelling and his auteurist signature can be found on every film he has directed, as well as many he has produced. This course will analyze the content and formal construction of Spielberg’s films by following their thematic through-lines – family ties (strained and healthy), the implacable threat, humanity at war, man vs. the natural world, the child’s perspective, and others – in films as disparate as Jaws and The Color Purple.

Summer 2017: FILM S4138D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 4138 001/22249 T Th 1:00pm - 5:00pm
511 Dodge Building
Stuart Weinstock 3 5/20

THEA S4215D New York Theatre Event: Off Broadway. 3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 150.00

In this course students explore the elements involved in the creation of theatre today in the historic heart of American theatre: New York City. The core elements of theatrical craft are discussed: playwriting, directing, acting, design and producing. Aspects of New York theatrical history complement these discussions by exploring the roots and traditions of theatrical practice. While a variety of theatrical forms and styles are explored, this course is rooted in contemporary dramatic texts. Each week students attend a live performance at various venues throughout the city in order to gain insight into the ways that theatre truly becomes a New York event.

Summer 2017: THEA S4215D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
THEA 4215 001/71114 M W 7:00pm - 10:00pm
603 Dodge Building
Christopher Burney 3 10/20

VIAR S1001Q Basic Drawing. 3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 80.00

Fundamentals of visual vocabulary. Students work from observation using still-life objects and the human figure. Emphasizes the relationship of lines and forms to each other and to the picture format. Materials used: vine charcoal, compressed charcoal, pencil, pen, ink, and brushes. Class assignments, discussions, and critiques.

Summer 2017: VIAR S1001Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 1001 001/74064 T W Th 5:30pm - 8:00pm
501 Dodge Building
Jose Zuniga 3 17/18

VIAR S3210D Painting I. 3 points.


Fee: Materials Fee - 80.00

This is an intensive, six-week class moving from the basics of paint materials, techniques, issues of color, light, narrative and most of all representation. Students will begin working from still life set-ups in the studio and gradually move towards more ambitious approaches including figure painting from a model. Towards the end of the class students will be encouraged to work on a project or projects that more closely reflect their personal ideas.

Summer 2017: VIAR S3210D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 3210 001/10832 T W Th 5:30pm - 8:00pm
401 Dodge Building
Lucy Campana 3 12/16

VIAR S3411D Printmaking: Silkscreen. 3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 125.00

Introduction to the fundamentals of silkscreen techniques. Students gain familiarity with the technical processes of silkscreen and are encouraged to use the processes to develop their visual language. Students are involved in a great deal of drawing for assigned projects. Portfolio required at end.

Summer 2017: VIAR S3411D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 3411 001/64319 T Th 6:00pm - 9:00pm
210 Dodge Building
Bryan Jabs 3 12/15

VIAR S3701D Introduction to Photography. 3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 125.00

An introductory course in black-and-white photography, Photography I is required for admission to all other photo classes. Students are initially instructed in proper camera use and basic film exposure and development. Then the twice weekly meetings are divided into lab days where students learn and master the fundamental tools and techniques of traditional darkroom work used in 8x10 print production and classroom days where students present their work and through the language of photo criticism gain an understanding of photography as a medium of expression. Admitted students must obtain a manually focusing 35mm camera with adjustable f/stops and shutter speeds. No prior photography experience is required.

Summer 2017: VIAR S3701D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 3701 001/22193 T Th 6:15pm - 9:25pm
212 Dodge Building
Patrice Helmar 3 14/15

VIAR S3701Q Introduction to Photography. 3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 125.00

An introductory course in black-and-white photography, Photography I is required for admission to all other photo classes. Students are initially instructed in proper camera use and basic film exposure and development. Then the twice weekly meetings are divided into lab days where students learn and master the fundamental tools and techniques of traditional darkroom work used in 8x10 print production and classroom days where students present their work and through the language of photo criticism gain an understanding of photography as a medium of expression. Admitted students must obtain a manually focusing 35mm camera with adjustable f/stops and shutter speeds. No prior photography experience is required.

Summer 2017: VIAR S3701Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 3701 002/13282 M W 6:15pm - 9:25pm
212 Dodge Building
Jesse Wakeman 3 15/15
VIAR 3701 003/73230 T Th 6:15pm - 9:25pm
212 Dodge Building
Dana Buhl 3 15/15

VIAR S4105D Advanced Painting Intensive. 6 points.

Requires separate application with portfolio samples see description for details.
Fee: Course Fee - 500.00

Prerequisites: must have a BA, BFA or equivalent. Apply directly to the School of the Arts. For more information please see: http://arts.columbia.edu/summer/visual-arts/course/advanced-painting-intensive-nyc.

The Advanced Painting Intensive mentors a group of up to twelve students through individual and group critique, technical tutorials, exposure to the New York gallery and museum worlds, and lectures and critiques by nationally known visiting artists. The six-week, six-credit workshop is based on the elements and structure of Columbia's MFA degree program and is tailored to those who are interested in challenging and advancing their work in an immersive and nurturing environment. Additionally, the workshop is geared to those who desire to develop both a strong visual portfolio and a written package appropriate for applications to MFA programs. The Advanced Painting Intensive is led by Professor Gregory Amenoff, the Chair of Visual Arts at Columbia University. Professor Amenoff has exhibited his paintings nationally and internationally for four decades and was one of the founders of Columbia University's prestigious MFA visual arts program.

Summer 2017: VIAR S4105D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 4105 001/70780 M T W Th F 10:00am - 6:00pm
310 Dodge Building
Gregory Amenoff, Lauren Silva 6 9

VIAR S4107D Photography Intensive. 6 points.

5/22 is the last day to register for this course.
Fee: Lab Fee - 500.00

The Photography Intensive engages students in all elements of photographic practice and the development of a portfolio. The experienced faculty are responsive to the specific needs of each photographer and the course is appropriate for students at any level. The curriculum is designed for students to quickly accelerate their understanding of the language of photography and to realize the creative possibilities in their own work. A combination of technical tutorials, individual meetings with internationally renowned artists and art professionals, as well as a series of seminars and group critiques, provide students with the tools they need to advance professionally and further develop the core elements of their practice. The Photography Intensive provides an exceptional workshop environment where students have 24-hour access to traditional and digital facilities, coupled with daily hands-on assistance from experienced faculty and staff, culminating in a group exhibition at the LeRoy Neiman Gallery. Students are expected to produce work independently throughout the six-week term and fully dedicate their time and efforts to the course. The course is designed for several distinct types of students: exceptional undergraduates passionate about photography, college graduates preparing to apply for MFA programs, experienced photographers looking to gain knowledge of the photographic tradition and its advanced techniques, and seasoned artists and teachers wishing to rigorously develop their practice through a critical dialogue with faculty and other students.

Summer 2017: VIAR S4107D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 4107 001/29889 M T W Th F 10:00am - 6:00pm
109 Watson Hall
Thomas Roma, Yoav Horesh 6 9

WRIT S1001D Fiction Writing Workshop. 3 points.

Runs From May 22- June 30,Enrollment limited to 15.
Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

The Fiction Writing Workshop is designed for students who have little or no experience writing imaginative prose. Students are introduced to a range of craft concerns through exercises and discussions, and eventually produce their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

Summer 2017: WRIT S1001D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1001 001/29854 M W 5:30pm - 7:40pm
411 Dodge Building
Amy Koppelman 3 10/15

WRIT S1001Q Fiction Writing Workshop. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.
Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

The Fiction Writing Workshop is designed for students who have little or no experience writing imaginative prose. Students are introduced to a range of craft concerns through exercises and discussions, and eventually produce their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

Summer 2017: WRIT S1001Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1001 002/62646 M W 1:00pm - 3:10pm
411 Dodge Building
Rachel Sherman 3 15/15

WRIT S1101Q Nonfiction Writing Workshop. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.
Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

The Nonfiction Writing Workshop is designed for students new to the practice of such genres as reportage, criticism, biography and memoir. Various techniques are explored through exercises and other assignments. Critique of student work is supplemented by outside readings.

Summer 2017: WRIT S1101Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1101 001/77611 T Th 6:15pm - 8:25pm
411 Dodge Building
Anelise Chen 3 15/15

WRIT S1201Q Poetry Writing Workshop. 3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 20.00

The Poetry Writing Workshop is designed for all students with a serious interest in poetry writing, from those who lack significant workshop experience or training in the craft of poetry to seasoned workshop participants looking for new challenges and perspectives on their work. Students will be assigned writing exercises emphasizing such aspects of verse composition as the poetic line, the image, rhyme and other sound devices, verse forms, repetition, collage, and others. Students will also read an variety of exemplary work in verse, submit brief critical analyses of poems, and critique each other's original work.

Summer 2017: WRIT S1201Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1201 001/71979 T Th 6:15pm - 8:25pm
409 Dodge Building
Dorothea Lasky 3 15/15

WRIT S4313D Writing Children's Books. 3 points.


Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

There are many misconceptions as to what makes an appealing story for children and how to get a story published. Many novice writers are simply relating an incident as opposed to creating a story. This course will show beginner and experienced writers how to mine their lives and imaginations for ideas and how to develop those ideas into children's stories-a step by step process from inspiration to finished manuscript for picture books, early readers, emerging readers and chapter books. Students will also learn the importance of reading their writing out loud-a process that helps both reader and listener develop a better ear for the story's pace, cadence and structure. Writing for children has become incredibly popular in the past fifteen years and publishing houses have been inundated with manuscripts. Many houses have ceased accepting unsolicited manuscripts all together. This course will disclose other avenues to getting your manuscript into the hands of agents and editors.

Summer 2017: WRIT S4313D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4313 001/12031 M W 1:00pm - 3:10pm
411 Dodge Building
Peter Catalanotto 3 10/15

WRIT S4320D Travel Writing. 3 points.


Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

How does the traveler become the travel writer?  What makes good travel writing? Why does it matter today? This course examines and breaks down the very specific craft of travel writing. Simply because we like to travel, does it qualify us to write about it? Everywhere has been written about, so how do we find something fresh to say about… Paris, or even Patagonia?   In this course, we both dispel, and prove, some of the myths of travel writing. Students learn to find an angle in order to uncover destinations anew and make them personal— it’s in the personal that the universal is revealed.   From crafting a compelling lede and understanding the need for a strong “nut graph,” to knowing the value of dialogue in propelling the story forward, and then finding the ideal kicker to send the reader away satisfied, students dissect published stories and are sent out into “the field” (of New York City) to craft their own. Travel writing is more than, “I went here, I did this, I ate that.” From front-of-book and service pieces, to destination features, we discuss magazine and newspaper travel writing in depth, as well as touch on longer form travel writing. Finally, through exercises and assignments, students learn to craft a compelling pitch in order to approach editors.

Summer 2017: WRIT S4320D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4320 001/20942 T Th 6:15pm - 8:25pm
411 Dodge Building
Porter Fox 3 12/15

WRIT S4323D Writing the Young Adult Novel. 3 points.


Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

Young adult fiction is a relatively new category in book publishing, but it is growing fast. The readers of YA books are between 12 and 18 years of age. However, its popularity can sometimes extend well beyond the intended age range; Harry Potter being the best-known example. The YA category spans a number of subgenres, including paranormal romance, dystopian sci-fi, and coming-of-age realism. The best YA novels feature fully realized characters and a level of emotional complexity that appeal to teens. And yet, YA books can include frightful displays of violence and can be unabashed about sex. They also feature swiftly moving plots combined with a young person's unique world view-pairings that are unlike anything found in traditional literary fiction. In this workshop, we will embark on writing our own YA novels. With our work always at the center of discussion we will explore the essence of what makes it YA in terms of narrative point of view and subject matter while also challenging the conventions of genre fiction. By way of example, we will look at the work of Sherman Alexie, Lois Lowry and Megan McCafferty. For examples of "new adult" or "crossover" fiction we will read excerpts from books such as those by Curtis Sittenfeld, J.D. Salinger, and others. Course work will include selected readings, but the emphasis of the workshop will be on writing and critiquing our own work. Students will write up to three chapters of an original YA or crossover novel along with a partial chapter outline for their book in progress. The class will also include visits from published YA authors who will speak about craft, audience, and getting published.

Summer 2017: WRIT S4323D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4323 001/64283 T Th 10:00am - 12:00pm
411 Dodge Building
Rachel Carter 3 13/15

WRIT S4411Q Creative (Mis)Translation. 3 points.


Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

No foreign language required.Translation is at once a process, a procedure, and a metaphor. The practice of translation brings out our hidden prejudices, our ingrained biases; notions of the literary text that we take for granted come to the foreground and call on us to make crucial choices, aesthetic and political. In this short course, we'll see how the problems of translation "translate" over to the writing of fiction and poetry. By recuperating volition and agency in the encounter with the authority(ies) present in any given text, the writer finds openings in and through translation. We'll explore the generative aspects of translation and "mis­ translation": how translating might open up new reserves oflanguage for us to mine; how it might loosen our grip on our own "voice" and let in others; and conversely, how our own language might affect our encounter with a foreign or faraway voice.

Summer 2017: WRIT S4411Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4411 001/71513 T Th 5:30pm - 7:40pm
407 Dodge Building
Matvei Yankelevich 3 6/15

WRIT S4710D More Than Memoir. 3 points.


Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

Many of us want to write memoirs, but families-troubled or not-are loaded territory. Memories conflict with family lore; trauma in the past can trigger trouble in the present; and only the dead don't mind when you spill their secrets. How do we navigate wisely, mining recollections without either slipping into solipsism or pandering to an imagined audience? In this class we'll look at writers who have done it, such as James Baldwin, Annie Dillard, Vivian Gornick, Richard Rodriguez, and Sister Souljah, to trace their fault lines and unearth their strategies for remaining faithful to their readers while truthful to their lived experience. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will write and workshop several family scenes. With the student work in hand, we'll be able to explore issues of voice and point of view, and ways to gain enough emotional distance from characters to make them both believable and three-dimensional. We'll build these scenes into a few full-length stories or, if a student wishes, chapters for a larger work.

Summer 2017: WRIT S4710D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4710 001/73195 M W 6:15pm - 8:25pm
409 Dodge Building
Cristen Beam 3 10/15

WRIT S4810Q How to Write Funny. 3 points.


Fee: Materials Fee - 20.00

In this class we will consider the various forms and functions of humor in written prose, discussing techniques and approaches to humor writing. Students will write their own humorous stories and essays which we will read and discuss in class, focusing not only on what is or isn't funny, but on how humor can be advantageously used to increase the power of an overall piece. The class will also break down stories, novels, and essays from a variety of authors-Bill Hicks' political satire; the darkly comedic fiction of Barry Hannah and Paul Beatty; the absurd humor of Tina Fey and Baratunde Thurston; Anthony Lane's charming British snarkiness; Spy Magazine's sharply parodic voice; Woody Allen's one-liners; Lena Dunham's zeitgeist comedy-in an effort to better understand what makes their humor work. Students will be asked to write stories inspired and influenced by these authors. As we critique each other's work, we will investigate strategies related to the craft of humor writing, including self-deprecation, political satire, humor and the other, going blue, dark comedy, schtick, humor as a means vs. humor as an end, crossing the line, and how to write funny without sacrificing substance.

Summer 2017: WRIT S4810Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4810 001/63067 M W 5:30pm - 7:40pm
411 Dodge Building
Patricia Marx 3 15/15

The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors as may become necessary.