Slavic Languages and Literature

Course Listing

Slavic Languages and Literature

For questions about specific courses, contact the department:

Departmental Office: 708 Hamilton
212-854-3941
Office Hours: Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Web: www.columbia.edu/cu/slavic


Directory of Classes

The course information displayed on this page relies on an external system and may be incomplete. Please visit Slavic Languages on the Directory of Classes for complete course information.

After finding your course in the Directory of Classes, click on the section number to open an expanded view. The "Open To" field will indicate whether the course is open to School of Professional Studies students. If School of Professional Studies is not included in the field, students may still be able to cross-register for the course by obtaining permission after being admitted to an academic program.


BCRS G6132 Studies in the Nineteenth-Century Novel:Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and their French, English, and American Precursors. 4 points.

This seminar explores the relations between the novels of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky and the nineteenth-century English, French, and American novels that the Russian novelists responded to as they adapted the form to their Russian reality and vision. Novels are clustered by type (the social problem novel, the novel of the city, novels about wars against Napoleon and his spirit, the political novel, the Bildungsroman, the novel of adultery). non-Russian novelists include: Balzac, Flaubert, Stendhal, Sue (French); Ch. Bronte, Dickens, Gaskell, Eliot, Thackeray (English); Beecher Stowe, Hawthorne (American). Students may read Russian and French works in English translation.

BCRS UN1101 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2018: BCRS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1101 001/67439 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Alexey Pekov 4 4/12

CLCZ GU4035 The Writers of Prague. 3 points.

A survey of the Czech, German, and German-Jewish literary cultures of Prague from 1910 to 1920. Special attention to Hašek, ÄŒapek, Kafka, Werfel, and Rilke. Parallel reading lists available in English and in the original.

Spring 2018: CLCZ GU4035
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCZ 4035 001/28251 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 9/25

CLRS G6132 Studies in Nineteenth-Century Russian Novel. 4 points.

This course explores the relations between the novels of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky and their compatriots and the classic English, French and American novels.

CLRS GU4012 The Russian Novel and the West, I and II. 3 points.

Prerequisite: instructor’s permission.  Representative and influential Russian novels and stories read in juxtaposition to Western counterparts from the 18th to the 20th centuries.  Parallel reading lists in the original and in translation

CLRS W4035 Word and Image in Russian Culture 1720-1920. 3 points.

Reading knowledge of Russian and some reading ability in French are desirable.  Examination of the possible relationships of the verbal and the visual in 18th- and 19th-century Russian literature and culture.  Considers the Byzantine heritage, the "symbols and emblems" of the Petrine baroque, the allegories of court culture, the notion of the picturesque, the "visibility" of "classical" Russian literature and turn-of-the-century culture, and the very possibility of illustrating words with images. The course is comparative, placing Russian examples against a European background to explore what is universal and what is specific about the interplay of word and image in Russia.

CLSL W4003 Central European Drama in the Twentieth Century. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Focus will be on the often deceptive modernity of modern Central and East European theater and its reflection of the forces that shaped modern European society. It will be argued that the abstract, experimental drama of the twentieth-century avant-garde tradition seems less vital at the century's end than the mixed forms of Central and East European dramatists.

CLSS G4028 In the Shadow of Empires: Literature of the South Slavs From Realism to Today. 3 points.

Readings and discussion of the most important works of the South Slavic writers from the second half of the 19th Century to the present,

CZCH UN1101 Elementary Czech I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2018: CZCH UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1101 001/76125 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Christopher Harwood 4 1/12

CZCH UN1102 Elementary Czech II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2018: CZCH UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1102 001/26192 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
351c International Affairs Bldg
Christopher Harwood 4 3/12

CZCH W2102 Intermediate Czech II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

POLI GU4101 Advanced Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Fall 2018: POLI GU4101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4101 001/73191 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Christopher Caes 4 4/12

POLI UN1101 Elementary Polish I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2018: POLI UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1101 001/73902 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Eliza Rose 4 1/12

POLI UN1102 Elementary Polish II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2018: POLI UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1102 001/70230 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 8/12

POLI W2102 Intermediate Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

POLI W4102 Advanced Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

RMAN W4002 Romanian Culture, Identity and Complexes. 3 points.

This course addresses the main problems that contribute to the making of Romanian identity, as fragmented or as controversial as it may seem to those who study it. The aim is to become familiar with the deepest patterns of Romanian identity, as we encounter it today, either in history, political studies, fieldwork in sociology or, simply, when we interact with Romanians. By using readings and presentations produced by Romanian specialists, we aim to be able to see the culture with an "insider's eye", as much as we can. This perspective will enable us to develop mechanisms of understanding the Romanian culture and mentality independently, at a more profound level and to reason upon them.

RUSS G6009 Gogol. 4 points.

A close study of the major works in the original.

RUSS GU4350 Moving to Advanced-Plus: Language, Culture, Society in Russian Today. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Six semesters of college Russian and the instructor’s permission.

The course is designed to provide advanced and highly-motivated undergraduate and graduate students of various majors with an opportunity to develop professional vocabulary and discourse devices that will help them to discuss their professional fields in Russian with fluency and accuracy. The course targets all four language competencies: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as cultural understanding. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2018: RUSS GU4350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4350 001/13450 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Nataliya Kun 3 8/15

RUSS GU4910 Literary Translation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: four years of college Russian or the equivalent.

Workshop in literary translation from Russian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim is to produce translations of publishable quality.

Fall 2018: RUSS GU4910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4910 001/76368 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Ronald Meyer 4 3/12

RUSS N0101 First-Year Russian, I. 0 points.

The same course as Russian W1101x, on a noncredit basis

RUSS UN1101 First-year Russian I. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Fall 2018: RUSS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1101 001/67214 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Elaine Wilson 5 10/12
RUSS 1101 002/71679 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Milica Ilicic 5 4/12
RUSS 1101 003/68745 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Room TBA
Tomi Haxhi 5 6/12
RUSS 1101 004/65125 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
Room TBA
Stephen Bruce 5 2/12

RUSS UN1102 First-year Russian II. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Spring 2018: RUSS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1102 001/25124 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
Ben Hooyman 5 10/12
RUSS 1102 002/61261 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
709 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 5 6/12
RUSS 1102 003/66310 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
616 Hamilton Hall
William Hanlon 5 10/12
RUSS 1102 004/75381 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Michael Gluck 5 5/12

RUSS UN3332 Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Scary Stories. 3 points.

For non-native speakers of Russian.

Prerequisites: two years of college Russian or the instructor's permission.

The course is devoted to the reading, analysis, and discussion of a number of Russian prose fiction works from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to apply their language skills to literature. It will teach students to read Russian literary texts as well as to talk and write about them. Its goal is, thus, twofold: to improve the students' linguistic skills and to introduce them to Russian literature and literary history. A close study in the original of the "scary stories" in Russian literature from the late eighteenth century. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2018: RUSS UN3332
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3332 001/17453 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Irina Reyfman 3 9/18

RUSS UN3430 Russian for Heritage Speakers I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V3430 or the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. THIS COURSE, TAKEN WITH RUSS V3431, MEET A TWO YEAR FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2018: RUSS UN3430
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3430 001/69641 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Alla Smyslova 3 8/15

RUSS UN3431 Russian for Heritage Speakers II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V3430 or the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. THIS COURSE, TAKEN WITH RUSS V3430, MEET A TWO YEAR FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Conducted in Russian.

Spring 2018: RUSS UN3431
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3431 001/61613 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 3 15/15

RUSS V1201 Second-year Russian I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V1102 or the equivalent.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review. This course number has been changed to RUSS 2101

RUSS V1202 Second-year Russian II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V1102 or the equivalent.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review. This course number has been changed to RUSS 2102

RUSS V3220 Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]. 3 points.

Explores the aesthetic and formal developments in Russian prose, especially the rise of the monumental 19th-century novel, as one manifestation of a complex array of national and cultural aspirations, humanistic and imperialist ones alike. Works by Pushkin, Lermonotov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Knowledge of Russian not required.

RUSS W4006 Russian Religious Thought, Praxis, and Literature. 3 points.

This course examines the interaction of religious thought, praxis, and literature in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. As the Russian Empire sought to define it place in the world, many Russian writers and thinkers turned to religious experience as a source of meaning. A varied body of work emerged as they responded to the tradition of Russian Orthodoxy. The goals of this course are to acquaint students with key texts of Russian religious thought and to give students the knowledge and tools required for critical inquiry into the religious dimension of Russian literature and culture.

RUSS W4155 History of Russian & Soviet Film. 3 points.

The aesthetic innovations and theoretical explorations of Russian and Soviet film culture constitute one of the richest traditions in world cinema. At the same time, Russian and Soviet cinema provides a unique lens through which to view the tumultuous changes that took place throughout Russia during the twentieth century. We will study a wide variety of Russian films from the pre-revolutionary era; the exciting, world-renowned decade of radical cinematic experimentation in the twenties; the periods of Socialist Realism, WWII, the Thaw, Stagnation, and Perestroika; and, finally, we will look at how these various aesthetic and ideological approaches to filmmaking inform the cinema and media practices of the post-Soviet era. Directors include: Lev Kuleshov, Sergei Eisenstein, Abram Room, Dziga Vertov, Vasiliev Brothers, Grigory Alexandrov, Mikhail Kalatozov, Leonid Gaidai, Andrei Tarkovsky, Sergei Parajanov, Mikita Mikhalkov, Aleksei German, Andrei Zviagintsev, and others. We will also consider the vital contributions of Russian and Soviet film theorists to the global discourse of film studies, reading the theoretical works of Eisenstein, Vertov, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Tarkovsky and others within their historical and cultural contexts. The course will also address innovations and advances in film style that originated in the film culture of non-Russian territories and republics.

RUSS W4333 Fourth-year Russian I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Systematic study of problems in Russian syntax; written exercises, translations into Russian, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS W4334 Fourth-year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Discussion of different styles and levels of language, including word usage and idiomatic expression; written exercises, analysis of texts, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS W4351 Moving to Advanced-Plus: Language, Culture, Society in Russian Today. 3 points.

Prerequisites: eight semesters of college Russian and the instructor’s permission.

The course is designed to provide advanced and highly-motivated undergraduate and graduate students of various majors with an opportunity to develop professional vocabulary and discourse devices that will help them to discuss their professional fields in Russian with fluency and accuracy. The course targets all four language competencies: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as cultural understanding. Conducted in Russian.

RUSS W4910 Literary Translation. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Four years of college Russian or the equivalent.

Workshop in literary translation from Russsian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim of the class is to produce translation of publishable quality.

UKRN UN1101 Elementary Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Fall 2018: UKRN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1101 001/21245 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 1/12

UKRN UN1102 Elementary Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Spring 2018: UKRN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1102 001/24861 M W 2:40pm - 4:30pm
351a International Affairs Bldg
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/12

UKRN W4054 Creating Identity in Contemporary Ukrainian Culture. 0 points.

This course presents and examines post-Soviet Ukrainian culture.  Students will learn about the significant achievements, names, events, scandals and polemics in contemporary Ukrainian culture and will see how they have contributed to Ukraine’s post-Soviet identity.  Centered on the most important successes in literature, the course will also explore the key developments in music and visual art in this period.  The course will look at what images have come to represent Ukraine and how they were created.  By also studying Ukrainian culture with regards to its relationship with Ukraine’s changing political life, students will obtain a good understanding of the dynamics of today’s Ukraine and the development of Ukrainians as a nation in the 21st century.  The course will be complemented by audio and video presentations and, through the Harriman Institute’s on-going Contemporary Ukrainian Literature Series, will offer students the unique opportunity to meet several leading Ukrainian writers in-person.   Entirely in English with a parallel reading list for those who read Ukrainian.

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