Art History and Archaeology

Course Listing

Art History and Archaeology

Departmental Representative:
Dr. Holger A. Klein
826 Schermerhorn
212-854-3230
hak56@columbia.edu

To request a syllabus, please contact the course instructor. You can find contact information for an instructor on the university directory.

AHIS S3010Q Evaluating the Evidence of Authenticity. 4 points.

    The adjudged authenticity of a work of art is fundamental in determining its value as a commodity on the art market or, for example, in property claim disputes or in issues of cultural property restitution.  Using case studies some straightforward and others extremely vexing--this course examines the many ways in which authenticity is measured through the use of provenance and art historical research, connoisseurship, and forensic resources.  From within the broader topics, finer issues will also be explored, among them, the hierarchy of attribution, condition and conservation, copies and reproductions, the period eye and the style of the marketplace.

AHIS S3219D 0s and 1s: Digital and Computational Approaches to the Study of Medieval Art and Architect. 4 points.

In his Universal History of Numbers, Georges Ifrah recounted that he undertook his monumental study of numbers because a pupil once asked him “Where ‘Numbers’ Come From”. This course, 0s and 1s, considers the epilogue of the history of numbers: “Where did ‘Numbers’ bring us.” Today, the study of the art historian is flooded with an endless stream of visual, numerical, and electronic data. Computers and mobile devices offer sophisticated renderings of remote objects of art, spaces, and architecture. Digital technologies provide unprecedented means of analysis and research.  At the same time, however, new technologies bear on the overall direction art and architectural research is taking. This course investigates pros and cons of the new digital methods for art and architectural history. In this course, students will have the opportunity to learn the difference between observing art and architecture through digital media and direct contact with physical objects during museum visits at the Cloisters and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through the analysis of new methods for studying art and architecture from Europe and the Mediterranean in the Middle Ages, this course aims at introducing students to computational and digital art history. 

Summer 2018: AHIS S3219D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3219 001/74157  
4 0

AHIS S3306D Donatello to Degas: Dance and the Early Modern Artist . 3 points.

From an interdisciplinary point of view, this course investigates the representation of dance in Early Modern art.  Using case studies of canonical works by artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Raphael, Bruegel, Poussin, and Degas, we will examine images that exhibit both explicit and implicit depictions of dance.  From this point of departure, we will ask why the performing arts exert such a force upon how we experience and interpret a wide range of figures and figural compositions.  More specific questions will arise in relationship to the following themes: the impact of Antiquity, the simultaneous rise of art and dance theory, the representation of music and time, parallels between composition and choreography, the concept of grace, dance and religion, the depiction of violence, and the modern viewers informative eye.  Ultimately, the class aims to nurture a productive exchange between students from different departments, as well as foster the potential for pushing interdisciplinary study to its limits.  Lectures, discussions, and readings will be complemented by trips to museums, libraries, and performances.

Summer 2018: AHIS S3306D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3306 001/16659  
3 0

AHIS S3409D Fun City: The Architecture of New York’s Entertainment, Leisure, and Culture Industry. 4 points.

A city that never sleeps is one in which people play as hard as they work. This course will focus on the buildings, parks, and other venues in New York constructed specifically for play and relaxation. Organized typologically, it will cover everything from parks, playgrounds, and Broadway theaters, to World's Fairs, hotels, and museums-- places in which the city's residents seek escape from the stress of their daily lives. In the classroom, in the archival collections of Avery Library and in numerous field trips around the city and the phot, we will analyze these structures and milieux from the perspective of architectural history and urban design, trace their origins and development from the founding of the city to the present and look at how they have helped cut across but also harden class lines. We will examine the formal differences between high-brow and popular venues, discuss the problems of private and public patronage, as well as the financial and social impact of the entertainment industry on the wellbeing of the city as a whole. Above all, we will explore the ways in which places of play, recreation and escape have shaped the identity of and created a distinct look for New York, which, despite the enormous revenue that the culture and entertainment industry generates, are often at odds with the city's reality.

Summer 2018: AHIS S3409D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3409 001/75373  
4 0

AHIS S3426D Jackson Pollock and the NY School. 3 points.

Coming on the heels of the MoMA's blockbuster exhibit, this seminar will trace the rise and fall of Abstract Expressionism, from its pre-World War II precipitates in Europe (Surrealism) and in America (Regionalism), to the crucial moment when, as scholar Serge Guilbaut has argued, New York "stole" the idea of modern art, and finally, through the decade when Pop Art rendered Abstract Expressionism obsolete. Although special emphasis will be given to Jackson Pollock, whose persona and work reside at the literal and figurative center of the movement, we will also look closely at works by Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, Willem DeKooning, Lee Krasner, Louise Bourgeois, Helen Frankenthaler, Eva Hesse, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and Cy Twombly.  Class lectures and presentations will be supplemented with trips to New York's world-renowned museums.

Summer 2018: AHIS S3426D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3426 001/66462  
3 0

AHIS S3442D American Art in the Global Context of the "Long" Nineteenth Century. 4 points.

Through an examination of painting, sculpture, decorative arts, photography and the visual culture of the United States from 1750 to 1914, the course will explore how American artists responded to and operated within the wider world. Addressing themes shared in common across national boundaries, the class will consider how American art participated in the revolutions and reforms of the "long" nineteenth century, ranging from Romanticism to Modernism. The period witnessed the emergence of new technologies for creating, using, and circulating images and objects, the expansion and transformation of exhibition and viewing practices, and the rise of new artistic institutions, as well as the metamorphosis of the United States from its colonial origins to that of a world power, including the profound changes that occurred during the Civil War. The class will investigate how American art engaged with international movements while constructing national identity during a period of radical transformation both at home and abroad. In addition to lectures/discussions in the classroom, field trips to the Metropolitan Museum (the American Wing, Nineteenth Century Wing, Galleries of Modem and Contemporary Art, and the Photography Study Collection), the Museum of Modem Art and the Whitney Museum of Art, represent a vital aspect of the course. One of the important questions raised in the class is the recent reinterpretation of American art's interaction with international movements in museum installations and scholarship, moving away from an isolationist approach to one that engages with global influence and awareness. Readings will draw not only from primarily sources, but also from many of the publications of the Terra Foundation, whose exhibitions and research programs work to encourage an understanding and exploration of American Art from a global context.

Summer 2018: AHIS S3442D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3442 001/71246  
4 0

AHUM S2604D Arts of China, Japan, and Korea . 3 points.

Introduces distinctive aesthetic traditions of China, Japan, and Korea--their similarities and differences--through an examination of the visual significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts in relation to the history, culture, and religions of East Asia.

HUMA S1121D Masterpieces of Western Art. 3 points.

Equivalent to HUMA C1121 and F1121. Not a historical survey but an analytical study of masterpieces, including originals available in the metropolitan area. The chief purpose is to acquaint students with the experience of a work of art. A series of topics in the development of Western art, selected to afford a sense of the range of expressive possibilities in painting, sculpture, and architecture, such as the Parthenon, the Gothic cathedral, and works of Michelangelo, Bruegel, Picasso, and others. Space is limited. Columbia University undergraduates who need this course for graduation are encouraged to register during early registration.

Summer 2018: HUMA S1121D
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HUMA 1121 001/23134  
3 0
HUMA 1121 002/72955  
3 0
HUMA 1121 003/29613  
3 0
HUMA 1121 004/64043  
3 0
HUMA 1121 005/20702  
3 0
HUMA 1121 006/11790  
3 0
HUMA 1121 007/71739  
3 0

HUMA S1121Q Masterpieces of Western Art. 3 points.

Equivalent to HUMA C1121 and F1121. Not a historical survey but an analytical study of masterpieces, including originals available in the metropolitan area. The chief purpose is to acquaint students with the experience of a work of art. A series of topics in the development of Western art, selected to afford a sense of the range of expressive possibilities in painting, sculpture, and architecture, such as the Parthenon, the Gothic cathedral, and works of Michelangelo, Bruegel, Picasso, and others. Space is limited. Columbia University undergraduates who need this course for graduation are encouraged to register during early registration.

Summer 2018: HUMA S1121Q
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HUMA 1121 008/70523  
3 0
HUMA 1121 009/27181  
3 0
HUMA 1121 010/28397  
3 0
HUMA 1121 011/62827  
3 0
HUMA 1121 012/19486  
3 0
HUMA 1121 013/10574  
3 0

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