Curriculum & Courses

36 points for degree completion On-campus instruction; some business courses available online as pre-approved electives
Part-time* or full-time program Fall and spring intake
3–4 terms (full-time) or 6–10 terms (part-time) to complete  
Capstone Project

* International students in need of an F1 visa must enroll full-time (12 credits) and study on campus.

The curriculum focuses on the commercial and residential building sectors but covers processes of construction administration that are applicable to any kind of project – from stadiums and parks, to railroad terminals and airports, to bridges and tunnels. The program's twelve courses focus on the fundamentals of construction administration: cost estimating and project financing, techniques, human and material resources, construction law, conflict resolution, project management, and environmental safety and conservation.

Part-Time Program

During the first term, students enroll in two courses: the foundational Elemental Topics in Construction Administration and the core Principles of Construction Techniques (fall only) or Managing the Engineering and Construction Process (spring only). Students who enter the program with significant industry experience may request a waiver of the Elemental Topics in Construction Administration requirement, which will be granted or denied based on the results of a pre-term examination. Students granted a waiver must replace this course with an elective course carrying three points prior to graduation.

Following the first term, students are required to complete five additional core courses, two core electives, two additional approved electives (core or non-core) of choice, and the Capstone Project. Non-core electives may be chosen from courses offered through this program or, with the permission of the program director, from those offered through other schools or departments of the University.

In order to receive the M.S. degree, part-time students must complete the degree requirements within five years (10 terms, excluding summer) with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (B) or better. The recommended timeframe for completion is three years.

Full-Time Program

During the first term, students enroll in four courses: the foundational Elemental Topics in Construction Administration and the core Principles of Construction Techniques (fall only) or Managing the Engineering and Construction Process (spring only), as well as two core courses to be assigned by the program directors prior to or during orientation. Following the first term, students are required to complete five additional core courses, two core electives, an additional approved elective (core or non-core) of choice, and the Capstone Project. Non-core electives may be chosen from courses offered through this program or, with the permission of the program director, from those offered through other schools or departments of the University.

Following the first term, students are required to complete five additional core courses, two core electives,), two additional approved electives (core or non-core) of choice, and the Capstone Project. Non-core electives may be chosen from courses offered through this program or, with the permission of the program director, from those offered through other schools or departments of the University.

In order to receive the M.S. degree, full-time students must complete the degree requirements within two years (4 terms excluding summer) with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (B) or better. The recommended timeframe for completion is one year.

Time Commitment

The M.S. in Construction Administration is challenging and requires a significant commitment of time and energy. Most classes are scheduled in the evening and are two to three hours each. Students should plan on allocating a minimum of one to two hours of homework for each hour spent in class. Capstone Project classes may require students to spend time at actual construction sites during the day and/or weekend.

Sample Pathways

Click on an option to see sample pathways for the part-time program and the full-time program.

Part-Time Program

first term: fall
Elemental Topics in Construction Administration
Principles of Construction Techniques
second term: spring
Estimating Project Costs
Managing the Engineering and Construction Process
summer
Part-time students may optionally take one or more electives during the summer.
third term: fall
Legal Issues in Building Construction
Finance and Accounting in the Construction Industry
fourth term: spring
Safety in the Construction Industry
Scheduling for Modern Construction
summer
Part-time students may optionally take one or more electives during the summer.
fifth term: fall
Green Building and Sustainability
Human Resources in Construction Management
sixth term: spring
Residential Construction and Renovation
Construction Capstone Project

Full-Time Program

first term: fall
Elemental Topics in Construction Administration*
Principles of Construction Techniques
Finance and Accounting in the Construction Industry or Safety in the Construction Industry
Elective
second term: spring
Estimating Project Costs
Managing the Engineering and Construction Process
Finance and Accounting in the Construction Industry or Safety in the Construction Industry
Elective
summer
Approved Elective Coursework**
third term: fall
Legal Issues in Building Construction
Construction Capstone Project
Approved Elective Coursework (if not taken during summer)

* A waiver of Elemental Topics in Construction Administration is available to those who take an opt-out exam and achieve a score of 80 or higher. Students who waive the course must meet with the Program Director for advisement on a replacement course.
** Summer study is optional. Students who prefer a lighter courseload during their final term may wish to consider elective coursework during the summer.

Required Core Courses

All students complete these seven core courses.

Additional Core Courses

Choose one course below as the eighth and final required core course.

Core Elective Courses and Internship Opportunities

Choose at least three elective courses. With the permission of the program director, you may also select approved electives such as an internship or courses through other schools or departments of the University. If you wish to receive academic credit for an internship, you must meet with the program director to review internship opportunities. Once the program director determines the internship opportunity is consistent with the goals and mission of the M.S. in Construction Administration, you will be approved to register for a required companion course linked to your internship experience.

CapstoneProject

CIEN E4129. Managing the Engineering and Construction Process. 3 pts.

Description

This course introduces students to the principles, methods and tools necessary to manage the design and construction processes. Among the topics examined in detail are: elements of planning, estimating, scheduling, bidding and contractual relationships; valuation of project cash flows; critical path method. The course includes a survey of construction procedures, cost control and effectiveness, and practical techniques for completing capital projects on time and within budget. Spring term only.

CIEN E4131. Principles of Construction Techniques. 3 pts.

Description

This course concentrates on the importance of proper means and methods for insuring cost-effective design, construction and maintenance, as well as a safe work environment. The course includes guest speakers from the industry who will discuss various construction methods. Students work in teams on a semester-long case study of a Manhattan construction project, examining field activities, site safety, work progress and quality control.

CNAD PS5100. Estimating Project Costs. 3 pts.

Description

Covers the basics of estimating construction project costs. The first part of the course focuses on the quantitative aspect of estimating, including quantity take-offs, pricing, overhead costs, and profit. The components required for making successful bids are addressed and analyzed. The second part of the course concentrates on estimating in such areas as procurement, cost control, and change orders during the actual construction process.

CNAD PS5101. Finance and Accounting in the Construction Industry. 3 pts.

Description

Provides a foundation on the economic aspects of the construction business, including accounting, finance, and taxation. Among the topics covered are accounting and bookkeeping, managerial accounting, internal controls, financial analysis and presentation, contractor surety and lending, tax issues, and fraud. Guest lecturers are featured for certain topics.

CNAD PS5102. Safety in the Construction Industry. 3 pts.

Description

This course addresses the vital issue of construction site safety from a management perspective. Students gain insight into the challenges of accident prevention and techniques for managing safe and secure building projects. Includes a history of construction safety, accident causation theory, hazard control procedures, insurance and risk management, behavior-based safety initiatives, occupational safety and health management systems in construction firms, and the deployment of technologies such as three- and four-dimensional modeling and PDA-based inspection.

CNAD PS5103. Legal Issues in Building Construction. 3 pts.

Description

Provides in-depth analysis and discussion on all the relevant case law and statutory information pertaining to New York construction and engineering law along with practical insights, warnings, and advice culled from the instructing team’s years of experience. The major emphasis is on the principal contractual relationships (owner-contractor, owner-architect/engineer, contractor-subcontractor, and architect/engineer-consultant), and the problems that most commonly arise out of these relationships. Topics covered include licensing issues, contract issues, managing construction projects, design through build, bidding and procurement rules, insurance and surety bonds, site safety, mechanics’ liens, claims, alternative dispute resolution, and damages. Fall term only.

CNAD PS5105. Elemental Topics in Construction Administration. 3 pts.

Description

This course is designed to provide students with introductory knowledge and basic skills they will need to understand and apply as they progress through the program. Students receive an overview of key topics that will be covered in greater detail through core courses and electives during subsequent terms. Each class session provides a primer on a specific area of vital importance, including construction techniques, legal issues, contracts, blueprint reading, scheduling, sustainability, claims and more. Upon completion students will be familiar with basic concepts, terminology and procedures associated with the industry, and well prepared to study these subjects in greater depth.

CIEN E4132. Prevention and Resolution of Construction Disputes. 3 pts.

Description

This course covers the variety of contractual relationships in the engineering and construction industry and the actions that may result in disputes. Emphasis is given to the steps required for rapid, cost-effective resolution of disputes. Resolution techniques such as negotiating, mediation, arbitration, and litigation are examined, and case studies requiring oral and written presentations are incorporated into the class sessions.

CNAD PS5120. Scheduling for Modern Construction. 3 pts.

Description

A comprehensive introduction to the principles, methods and tools required for the development and implementation of scheduling in the construction industry. Topics covered include: the crucial role of the scheduling development plans, budgeting and its impact on project timelines, identification and analysis of critical paths (CPM), resource and cost loading, schedule updating, and schedule management. Coursework is integrated with hands‐on utilization of Oracle Primavera P3 and P6 scheduling and Microsoft Project 2007 software. Students may need to bring their own laptops/notebooks for some class sessions. Guest lecturers may be featured for certain topics.

OBJECTIVE: This course should prepare the student to prepare a CPM schedule, calculate the schedule manually or by use of computer software, evaluate the output of such software, and present such analysis both to field personnel for implementation and to upper management for overview.

CNAD PS5130. Green Building and Sustainability: Tools and Techniques. 3 pts.

Description

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of key concepts and approaches in green building and sustainability. Specific material will include best practices and trends in design, construction, and business; analysis tools; green building rating systems (with an emphasis on LEED and the Living Building Challenge); the paradigm of sustainable thinking; and applying sustainability in the real (working) world. The course will also provide a preparatory platform for individuals looking to take the LEED Green Associate exam (a precursor to the LEED AP). The course format is designed to support practical understanding, and will include presentations, discussions, guest lecturers, site visits, and a semester long group project to apply the concepts as they are discussed. Students will be provided with resources and tools to facilitate self-directed exploration of the topics, and a forum to develop and communicate findings and considerations

CNAD PS5136. IT Advantages in Construction. 3 pts.

Description

This course provides students with a solid hands-on foundation in BIM (Building Information Modeling) and other technologies that are revolutionizing the way 21st century construction projects are delivered. Starting from the Owner’s perspective, the class sessions will explore the benefits of BIM tools/methods as used by design teams, construction managers and sub-contractors. Students work with actual industry tools to create BIM Models that extract quantities for estimation purposes, link models to construction schedules (4D simulations), generate clash reports, and effectively communicate 3D site logistics plans. Once a BIM backbone is established, discussions will lead into and highlight: advanced applications, integration opportunities, responsibilities/contractual theories and the introduction of other 3rd Party Software. This course is a recommended companion course to CNAD PS5500, the Capstone Project. Students enrolling in the course are required to have their own notebook PC meeting the noted specifications. (Specs to come).

CIEN E4133. Capital Facility Planning and Financing. 3 pts.

Description

This course covers planning and financing of capital facilities with emphasis on civil infrastructure systems. Topics covered include project feasibility and evaluation; design of project delivery systems to encourage best value, innovation, and private-sector participation; fundamentals of engineering economy and project finance; elements of life-cycle cost estimation and decision analysis; environmental, institutional, social, and political factors. Case studies from transportation, water supply, and wastewater treatment are featured.

CNAD PS5132. Human Resources in Construction Management. 3 pts.

Description

Providing an overview of human resources as it relates to construction management firms, this course explores the various aspects of HR and talent management, defined as recruitment, retention, professional and leadership development, corporate culture, performance management, and workforce planning, all in the context of architecture/engineering/construction management (AEC) firms in the United States. The emphasis is on large national or multinational firms and their approaches to HR, now and in the future. Students learn how HR can make a difference in the way current and future general managers view the function in relation to business strategy and competitive advantage. Additionally, students analyze the difference between a strategically aligned HR function that numbers among the CEO's top business partners and a transaction-based HR function that is concerned primarily with personnel administration.

CNAD PS5133. Residential Construction and Renovations. 3 pts.

Description

Examines the skills and techniques needed for residential renovations. Residential interior renovation is a multibillion-dollar industry, and while many construction professionals enter the field of commercial core and shell work, there are many high-paying positions available in residential construction and renovation. Topics include residential versus commercial clients, budget development, contracting and subcontracting, schedule management, change orders, construction quality, and managing clients' psychological issues.

CNAD PS5134. Introduction to Building Systems: MEP’s. 3 pts.

Description

This course focuses on the core operational elements of any building: Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and Fire Prevention, increasingly complex systems requiring specialized coordination and planning. Students develop a thorough knowledge of MEP systems, equipment, and construction methods and a broad understanding of how they are implemented within the general construction process. Construction industry and project management principles are brought together in class lectures and demonstrations illustrating the process of taking a project from design to completion relative to its MEP components. Class sessions and assignments include simulations, case study discussions, individual and group exercises, and a final collaborative project drawing upon the tools and techniques taught during the course.

CNAD PS5135. Development and Construction: Process and Practice. 3 pts.

Description

This course explores the built environment and real estate cycle as well as major trends in development, design and construction. In depth examination of such topics as acquisition, entitlement, planning and construction provides students with a practical grasp of the many disciplines that come together in the execution of any real estate development project. Students gain an appreciation for the economics and the organizational complexities of the different phases of development while learning best practice in the management of consultants, contractors, government agencies and other stakeholders. Class sessions and assignments include simulations, case study discussions, individual and group exercises, and a final collaborative project drawing upon the tools and techniques taught during the course.

BUSI PS5001. Introduction to Finance. 3 pts.

Description

Students will be introduced to the fundamental financial issues of the modern corporation. By the end of this course, students will understand the basic concepts of financial planning, managing growth; debt and equity sources of financing and valuation; capital budgeting methods; and risk analysis, cost of capital, and the process of securities issuance.

BUSI PS5003. Corporate Finance. 3 pts.

Prerequisite

BUSI PS5001 Introduction to Finance or professor approval.

Description

Students will learn the critical corporate finance concepts including: financial statement analysis; performance metrics; valuation of stocks and bonds; project and firm valuation; cost of capital; capital investment strategies and sources of capital, and firm growth strategies. At the end of this course students will understand how to apply these concepts to current business problems.

BUSI PS5008. Options and Futures. 3 pts.

Description

Prerequisite

BUSI PS5001 Introduction to Finance and BUSI PS5003 Corporate Finance or professor approval.

Students will learn about financial derivative securities: their role in financial management is becoming increasingly important, especially in portfolio management. By the end of this course students will be able to identify valuation of various options and futures as well as their use in risk management. By the end of this course, students will be able to understand option and futures pricing models, option strategies and index arbitraging. Not available in summer.

BUSI PS4009. Financial Accounting. 3 pts.

Description

Students will examine the generally accepted account principles (GAAP) underlying financial statements and their implementation in practice. The perspective and main focus of the course is from the users of the information contained in the statements, including investors, financial analysts, creditors and, management. By the end of this class students will be able to construct a cash flow statement, balance sheet and decipher a 10K report.

BUSI PS5010. Managing Human Behavior in the Organization. 3 pts.

Description

Students will gain an overview of major concepts of management and organization theory, concentrating on understanding human behavior in organizational contexts, with heavy emphasis on the application of concepts to solve managerial problems. By the end of this course students will have developed the skills to motivate employees, establish professional interpersonal relationships, take a leadership role, and conduct performance appraisal.

BUSI PS5015. Leading Alignment and Agility. 3 pts.

Description

This course explains how leaders build competitive advantage within their organizations by creating a clear purpose; then balance it with agile practices that leverage, challenge and evolve that purpose. It explores how leaders use neuroscience-based techniques to unlock performance and adaptability as the speed of change continues to accelerate.

BUSI PS5020. Introduction to Marketing. 3 pts.

Description

Students will learn fundamental marketing concepts and their application. By the end of this class you will know: the elements of a market, company strategy, how to identify customers and competition, the fundamental elements of the marketing mix (product, price, placement and promotion) how to research consumer behavior, and pricing strategies. Students will have extensive use of case study projects.

BUSI PS5025. Marketing Strategy. 3 pts.

Description

Prerequisite

BUSI PS5020 Introduction to Marketing or professor approval.

Students will develop analytical skills used to formulate and implement marketing driven strategies for an organization. Students will develop a deeper understanding of marketing strategies and how to implement tactics to achieve desired goals. Students will work on case study projects in both individual and a team based projects. By the end of this course you will be able to develop a marketing strategy based market assessments and company needs.

BUSI PS5030. Developing and Implementing New Ideas. 3 pts.

Description

Interested in starting your own company? Do you have an idea for a new product or service? Have you come up with a way to improve something that already exists?

This course tackles the central business concept of how one creates, builds and leads companies. It looks at aspects of entrepreneurship and leadership for both individuals and teams in the face of complex situations. Using the case study method as taught in business school, also known as “participant-centered learning,” this course puts students in the role of an entrepreneur facing critical business decisions. A selection of guest speakers will offer firsthand experience on innovation and entrepreneurship.

BUSI PS5040. Security Analysis. 3 pts.

Prerequisite

BUSI PS5001 Introduction to Finance and BUSI PS5003 Corporate Finance or professor approval.

Description

Students will learn about the valuation of publicly traded equity securities. By the end of the semester students will be able to perform fundamental analysis (“bottoms-up,” firm-level, business and financial analysis), prepare pro forma financial statements, estimate free cash flows and apply valuation models.

BUSI PS5100. Global Emerging Markets. 3 pts.

Prerequisite

BUSI PS5001 Introduction to Finance (mandatory) and BUSI PS4009 Financial Accounting (recommended) or professor approval.

Description

Students will be able to benchmark countries’ performance and analyze business opportunities in the world economy. Additionally, students will learn to examine the relationships between trade policy, financial flows and development to understand factors contributing to financial crisis and the policies to remedy them. By the end of this semester students will be able to construct frameworks needed to formulate a global investment strategy. Not available in summer.

BUSI PS5301. Managing Information & Knowledge. 3 pts.

Description

In this course students learn the principles of management as they relate to enterprise-wide information and knowledge services. Attention is given to the philosophy and history of information and knowledge services, specifically as this background affects students’ future performance as business managers and leaders in the workplace. The course focus is on management and leadership skills, knowledge sharing, and the role of knowledge strategy in strengthening the corporate knowledge culture.

CNAD PS5500. Capstone Project. 3 pts.

Description

The Construction Administration Capstone Project course introduces the methods and tools necessary to analyze a set of plans and specifications for an active New York City building project (or projects) and includes a comprehensive review and analysis of documentation requirements for the selected project(s). Students are paired with appropriate industry managers and work in small teams, utilizing knowledge acquired from their core courses to develop and draft a comprehensive, professional level project manual. Review of contract plans and documents as well as site visits and interaction with actual project team members are required. To be taken during the final term of study.