Actuarial Science News

Actuary Ranks Among Top-Five Best Jobs

Taking into account environment, income, hiring outlook, and stress, CareerCast.com has ranked actuary the fourth-best job of 2014.

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CareerCast Report: Actuary Is Best Job of 2013

On the heels of Columbia adding online options for earning an Actuarial Science master’s degree or certification comes news that actuaries have the best job in the U.S.

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Columbia University Focuses on Big Data Analysis with Two Online Graduate Programs

In an effort to address anticipated needs in big data analysis, Columbia University will launch online versions of its Master of Arts in Statistics and Master of Science in Actuarial Science programs.

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The Ten Best Jobs of 2012

According to The Wall Street Journal and CareerCast's "Top Jobs of 2012", actuaries have the second best job in the country. Positions were ranked in five key areas of work environment, physical demands, job outlook, income levels and stress.

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Be Happy: Become an Actuary

Actuaries may spend the day fretting over risk and uncertainty, but when it comes to job satisfaction, it seems they have very little to worry about.

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New Electives in M.S. in Actuarial Science Reflect Industry Needs

The Actuarial Science graduate program continually strives to stay ahead of the curve in determining what courses would best serve their students and industry.

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Study Actuarial Science in the U.S.

With international insurance and financial sectors growing rapidly, students doing a master's degree in actuarial science in the U.S. have excellent job prospects.

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Columbia University Welcomes Noor Rajah, New Director of Graduate Program in Actuarial Science

Noor Rajah joins the graduate program in actuarial science as director.

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Advice Squad

Vice Dean Paul McNeil was part of a Time Out New York panel on continuing education.

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Science, Math Careers Rank as Best Jobs During Recession

Actuaries, and others in mathematically-oriented careers may have more job security during a recession than those in other professions, says The Baltimore Examiner.

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